64 bit or not.


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Hi have a question regarding choice of platform, i hope to find answers. Working with a project, customer wants to upgrade to 64-bit, but the have over 800 applications running today in a old XP environment. Is the best choice really to upgrade to 64bit, when most of the applications wont work?

Need some good advise! Thx
 
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clifford_cooley

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Hi twn444 - Welcome to w7forums

Is the best choice really to upgrade to 64bit, when most of the applications wont work?
Most of the applications will work.

In fact I am running applications that were designed for Windows 95/98 in Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit. There are literally dozens of threads on this topic within this forum alone.
 
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Are there any other benefits to run 64bit, other the possibility to address more memory to applications?
 
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Faster for video editing, engineering applications and things of that sort. Yes, more memory can be addressed too.

Other than those things or similar, no appreciable difference.

For games, internet browsing, multimedia etc...all the same.
 

Digerati

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64-bit is here to stay, 32-bit is on it's way out.
 

TrainableMan

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Almost any 32-bit app that will run on W7 32-bit will also work in 64-bit; only seriously old 16-bit apps may work on 32 but not in 64 w/o emulation/virtual environment.
 

TrainableMan

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I use 16-bit, with Windows for Workgroups 3.11. You can still get stuff done with it.
I guess my question would be, Why would you want to use 3.11? And why are you on a W7 forum if you use 3.11; are you thinking of upgrading? Pretty sure you will need a fresh install ... of hardware and everything :p
 
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While my computer's a bit out-of-date, I still enjoy using it and like to hear about the new software.
 

TrainableMan

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What new software? I don't think there is any new 16-bit software.
 

Core

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In a production environment where system and application functionality is in the "mission critical" category, you don't just change platforms on a whim. This is particularly true if the software in use is specific to the line of business the machine/s is/are used for. Field-specific software solutions tend to be the slowest to adopt new technologies; just look at how many threads we've seen about Amicus products having problems on Windows 7. On the flip side, hardcore multimedia production software are most likely to be quickest to make use of hyperthreading capabilities and such. So, it depends on the field.

Set up a test platform for the purpose of examining the feasibility of upgrading to 64-bit. If existing software in use does not play nice with 64-bit Windows, then consider upgrading the software. If this is unacceptable or there is no 64-bit compatible version, I'd suggest you recommend against a platform upgrade. As a last resort you might be able to run the old 32-bit junk in a VM.

If your customer is set on upgrading despite your presumable recommendation to the contrary, then it's his money to blow. My uncle who fixes cars for a living makes a nice living fixing cars previously fixed by so-called "do-it-yourself" guys.

I'm just saying, there's a different way one ought to approach upgrades to a business workstation as opposed to a home desktop.
 
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I have photoshop 5.5, it does all I want it to do and I'm running it with
Windows 7 64bit.

Thanks
 
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I would go 64Bit as it has more to offer than a 32Bit, one example, memory... 32Bit system will only allow 3GB of memory,win 7 will not support more than 3GB but you could put more in the PC but it is unlikely your 32bit system will recognize it, as for the 64Bit you can extend the memory to a potential 190GB on the higher end version.
 

Digerati

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It is a common misconception that 32-bit architectures and Win7 support only about 3Gb. That is incorrect. They both support 4Gb. The problem, if you can call it that, is that the OS can not usse all 4Gb as some is reserved for various hardware mappings. Some folks will see as much as 3.6Gb, some slightly less than 3Gb.

The confusion comes from not understanding the difference between addressing space and memory capacity.

Also a misconception is where the 4Gb limit comes from. It is not by design, but rather a limitation imposed by the Laws of Physics. 2^32=4Gb.

Here's a fairly good explanation: http://www.computerforum.com/150015-32bit-4gb-barrier-demystified-much-possible-pics.html
 
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It is a common misconception that 32-bit architectures and Win7 support only about 3Gb. That is incorrect. They both support 4Gb. The problem, if you can call it that, is that the OS can not usse all 4Gb as some is reserved for various hardware mappings. Some folks will see as much as 3.6Gb, some slightly less than 3Gb.

The confusion comes from not understanding the difference between addressing space and memory capacity.

Also a misconception is where the 4Gb limit comes from. It is not by design, but rather a limitation imposed by the Laws of Physics. 2^32=4Gb.

Here's a fairly good explanation: http://www.computerforum.com/150015-32bit-4gb-barrier-demystified-much-possible-pics.html

Thanks for your info
 

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