Windows Defender Offline


T

Tester

A new product from Microsoft (old name for sure but a new product with
real meaning to it) to look for in the next few months. It can do all
of this:

1. Windows won't boot: You can boot your machine with a WDO CD or USB
drive, and WDO will perform a detailed malware scan.

2. You suspect you have a rootkit: WDO can scan your system and remove
many different kinds of rootkits.

<http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/what-is-windows-defender-offline>

Good luck.
 
P

Paul

Tester said:
A new product from Microsoft (old name for sure but a new product with
real meaning to it) to look for in the next few months. It can do all
of this:

1. Windows won't boot: You can boot your machine with a WDO CD or USB
drive, and WDO will perform a detailed malware scan.

2. You suspect you have a rootkit: WDO can scan your system and remove
many different kinds of rootkits.

<http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/what-is-windows-defender-offline>

Good luck.
The reason for a 32 bit or a 64 bit version, is the tool builds its
own OS for the offline scan, using Windows files. Unlike some
other offline scanners, which come with their own OS.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh547009.aspx

Paul
 
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P

philo

A new product from Microsoft (old name for sure but a new product with
real meaning to it) to look for in the next few months. It can do all
of this:

1. Windows won't boot: You can boot your machine with a WDO CD or USB
drive, and WDO will perform a detailed malware scan.

2. You suspect you have a rootkit: WDO can scan your system and remove
many different kinds of rootkits.

<http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/what-is-windows-defender-offline>

Good luck.


All well and good but in the case of root kits...
what would lead someone to suspect one is when their credit card or bank
account gets compromised...
in other words *too late*


That's why I moved over to Linux 2+ years ago
 
B

BillW50

In
philo said:
All well and good but in the case of root kits...
what would lead someone to suspect one is when their credit card or
bank account gets compromised...
in other words *too late*

That's why I moved over to Linux 2+ years ago
You are a Linux user and don't know what Root means? That is where the
rootkit was originally created for. Hacking into Linux and Unix
machines. It just amazes me how many Linux users who knows nothing about
Linux malware. Most Linux users don't run AV software or anything. And
they could be totally infected with malware and still be totally
clueless.
 
B

BillW50

In
Alias said:
Cite one virus or root kit for Linux in the wild.
You got to be the laziest person I know.

http://packetstormsecurity.org/UNIX/penetration/rootkits

Cross-platform Boonana Trojan targets Facebook users | Naked Security
http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2010/10/28/cross-platform-worm-targets-facebook-users/

http://www.ossec.net/rootkits/lrk.php
The ONLY way it can happen is if the user lets it happen by keying in
his or her password when something tries to install.
No that isn't the only way. Like an attacker using a buffer overflow to
gain root level access is just one other way. And you can get infected
through an official repository too. Through Firefox, through Adobe
Flash, etc.

Gentoo ships backdoor
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/linux-infection-proves-windows-malware-monopoly-is-over-gentoo-ships-backdoor-updated/2206
Having a router with a NAT firewall enabled and keeping up-to-date
with security updates is ALL you need with Linux.
That is not what the Linux security people say.

Securing Linux
http://www.net-security.org/article.php?id=111

Linux Security HOWTO
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Security-HOWTO/

Linux Installation
http://www.phys.ufl.edu/docs/system/linux.html
YOU, Mr. No Windows Updates, are probably infected and
don't know it.
Always wishing upon a star, eh?
 
B

BillW50

In
Alias said:
All your links require user stupidity. No wonder you believe them. The
Facebook one is classic. No wishing, sport, you're infected.
User stupidity as in Alias? How in the world could you miss: "UnrealIRCd
detailing a trojan packaged with their IRCd (Internet Relay Chat deamon)
for Linux."? Linux users were downloading this trojan for over 7 months
and nobody noticed this backdoor running on their system. That is
because Linux users have this foolish blind trust that makes them
complacent.

Most Windows users don't have this blind trust and an Windows AV would
have flagged it right away and it would be gone. But Linux users don't
normally run AV, now do they?

Linux: Infected by Complacency | Computing on Demand
http://computingondemand.com/linux-infected-by-complacency/
 
R

Roy Smith

You are a Linux user and don't know what Root means? That is where
the rootkit was originally created for. Hacking into Linux and Unix
machines. It just amazes me how many Linux users who knows nothing
about Linux malware. Most Linux users don't run AV software or
anything. And they could be totally infected with malware and still
be totally clueless.
I honestly didn't know that, so I went to Wikipedia and found this:
The term rootkit or root kit originally referred to a
maliciously-modified set of administrative tools for a Unix-like
operating system that granted "root" access. If an intruder could
replace the standard administrative tools on a system with a rootkit,
the intruder could obtain root access over the system whilst
simultaneously concealing these activities from the legitimate system
administrator. These first generation rootkits were trivial to detect
by using tools such as Tripwire that had not been compromised to
access the same information.
It amazes me how the most die-hard Linux user claims that they are
impervious to viruses. Though truth be know it's more likely that there
isn't much of an interest in targeting such a small demographic, and the
interest is in targeting the most common OS on PCs today. Now if things
were the other way and Linux was the most popular OS on PCs then we
would be hearing about viruses on them instead.


--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Thunderbird 9.0.1
Sunday, January 08, 2012 8:36:03 AM
 
B

Bob I

I honestly didn't know that, so I went to Wikipedia and found this:


It amazes me how the most die-hard Linux user claims that they are
impervious to viruses. Though truth be know it's more likely that there
isn't much of an interest in targeting such a small demographic, and the
interest is in targeting the most common OS on PCs today. Now if things
were the other way and Linux was the most popular OS on PCs then we
would be hearing about viruses on them instead.
Devout Linux and Apple users rely on "security by obscurity", they just
don't know that is what it is called.
 
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R

Roy Smith

Thank you for regurgitating MS FUD. It's bullshit.
In your opinion.... just think about it, if you were of a criminal mind
and wanted to write a malware program to acquire bank account numbers
and you had your choice of three OSs. OS #1 has a base of 1,500,000
users, OS #2 has 9,000,000 users, and OS #3 has 250,000,000 users.
Which one would you choose?

I would think #3, not because it may be easier to write malware for that
OS, but because it has far more users than the other OSs thus increasing
your chances of obtaining your goal.


--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit
Thunderbird 9.0.1
Sunday, January 08, 2012 10:07:22 AM
 
B

BillW50

In
Roy said:
I honestly didn't know that, so I went to Wikipedia and found this:


It amazes me how the most die-hard Linux user claims that they are
impervious to viruses. Though truth be know it's more likely that
there isn't much of an interest in targeting such a small
demographic, and the interest is in targeting the most common OS on
PCs today. Now if things were the other way and Linux was the most
popular OS on PCs then we would be hearing about viruses on them
instead.
You got it exactly! ;-) And if a Linux user gets infected, it can go
undetected for months or even years. Most Windows users doesn't have
that problem because they are so vigilant against malware, it is
discovered and weeded out right away. Here is a good example of the
Linux community totally blinded and missed a trojan on Gentoo's official
repositories. Funny, no mention how many actually downloaded that
backdoor.

Linux: Infected by Complacency
http://computingondemand.com/linux-infected-by-complacency/
 
B

BillW50

In
Alias said:
Devout Windows users like you believe the MS FUD. Windows 7 is more
secure than XP due to its UAC and other features but enjoys a large
market share. Oops.
What no references again? If you want some credibility, you need to have
some reliable references. Here let me help you.

Users distributed by the operating system that has been exposed to
malicious code.

58% Windows Vista/7
41% Windows XP
3% Windows 2003
2% Windows 2000
0% Windows 98

This is how Windows get infected with malware
http://net-security.org/malware_news.php?id=1863

Unless I am missing something here, this study seems to suggest that
Windows 98 and 2000 are the safest Windows versions so far. Probably
because modern malware can't even run on them would be my guess. ;-)
 
C

Cheng Heng

BillW50 said:
You are a Linux user and don't know what Root means? That is where the
rootkit was originally created for. Hacking into Linux and Unix
machines. It just amazes me how many Linux users who knows nothing about
Linux malware. Most Linux users don't run AV software or anything. And
they could be totally infected with malware and still be totally
clueless.
Most Linux users are hobbyists and computer enthusiasts and so if their
system is infected, it does not matter at all.

Windows users are serious users who are using their systems to make a
living and so the system needs to be as secure as possible.
 
C

Cheng Heng

Alias said:
IOW, user stupidity and not the fault of Linux.

you can also say this to Windows user. It is user stupidity - not the
fault of windows for infected systems.
 
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B

BillW50

In
Cheng said:
Most Linux users are hobbyists and computer enthusiasts and so if
their system is infected, it does not matter at all.
I agree up to a point. But some also do online banking and other stuff
under Linux that would be very bad if a bad guy got a hold of.
Windows users are serious users who are using their systems to make a
living and so the system needs to be as secure as possible.
There is so much focus on Windows security that malware is having a hard
time getting through. Linux on the other hand is wide open since the
mass majority of them don't even think about security. That Gentoo's
repository is a good example as it had a Linux trojan go unnoticed for
about 7 months. In the Windows world, this would have been stopped
almost instantly.

Linux: Infected by Complacency
http://computingondemand.com/linux-infected-by-complacency/
 

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