Watching DVD movies on a computer.


P

Peter Jason

I don't have a TV at work, and sometimes I want to
watch a movie rented from the DVD hire-shop on my
computer.

Is there any software to make this possible? I
don't want to buy a DVD player just for this.

Peter
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Andy Burns

Peter said:
I don't have a TV at work, and sometimes I want to
watch a movie rented from the DVD hire-shop on my
computer.

Is there any software to make this possible? I
don't want to buy a DVD player just for this.
http://videolan.org/
 
J

James Silverton

I don't have a TV at work, and sometimes I want to
watch a movie rented from the DVD hire-shop on my
computer.

Is there any software to make this possible? I
don't want to buy a DVD player just for this.

Peter
Does your management approve of watching DVD's at work?
 
P

Paul

KCB said:
Windows Media Player 12 is included in all versions of Windows 7, and
will play DVDs.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Play-a-CD-or-DVD-in-Windows-Media-Player
Yes, but note the carefully worded caveat...

"If you have a DVD drive and a *compatible DVD decoder* installed
on your computer, you can use Windows Media Player to play a DVD-Video
disc — this is the type of DVD that movies are distributed on."

That's been the sticking point in the past. The CODEC, to be legal,
is typically licensed from a patent pool, and since that costs money,
companies like Microsoft don't like to bundle what's needed.

But before running out and buying WinDVD or PowerDVD, it's a good
idea to check "behind the sofa cushions". People would be
surprised, how many bundled copies of DVD movie players,
are included with the computers they bought, or the
retail boxed optical drive they bought, or the retail
motherboard they bought. I have at least two CDs, one in a
motherboard box, another in a Samsung optical drive box, that
I can use if I need a movie player.

More examples here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PowerDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_player_comparison

In the FOSS world, software derived from FFMPEG and libavcodec,
has made playing movies possible. Which is why you don't have
to pay money for this. But if you wanted a fancy looking piece of
software, the commercial versions can be had for next to nothing,
if they're bundled with another product. That's how I got my two
copies.

There is a fair amount of variation, in how much CPU those
kinds of programs take. If the computer is really underpowered
(below 1.5GHz perhaps), then you have to be more careful when
picking software. Just any old piece of crap won't do, when
your computer is that weak. Some video cards, have acceleration
for a few movie formats (hardware decoder), and sometimes, that
can make a difference. The free software, doesn't always have the
driver or software path, to access that (it's because the necessary
specs to access the hardware, may not be available without an NDA
being signed). And this is where you get the benefits from
commercial software - they may have more than one method
of playing the movies, baked into their code.

If the computer at work is a powerful one, then you'd be
less dependent on the software being well designed.

Paul
 
H

Howard

VLC Media Player is free and will frun virtually anything. Google it.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Aldred

Windows-Media-Player

Yes, but note the carefully worded caveat...

"If you have a DVD drive and a *compatible DVD decoder* installed
on your computer, you can use Windows Media Player to play a
DVD-Video disc — this is the type of DVD that movies are
distributed on."

That's been the sticking point in the past. The CODEC, to be legal, is
typically licensed from a patent pool, and since that costs money,
companies like Microsoft don't like to bundle what's needed.
There don't seem to be any problems with the versions of Windows 7 that I
am running.

I can play DVDs with Media Player without having to obtain additional
Codecs.

I have 2 machines with Windows 7 Professional 64 bit pre-installed, and 2
machines on which I installed the full retail version of Windows 7 Home
Premium 32 bit. All will play DVDs without any problems.
 
I

Iceman

Does your management approve of watching DVD's at work?
You know, the OP could be self-employed, and thus under his own management.
;-)
 
M

Metspitzer

Yes, but note the carefully worded caveat...

"If you have a DVD drive and a *compatible DVD decoder* installed
on your computer, you can use Windows Media Player to play a DVD-Video
disc — this is the type of DVD that movies are distributed on."

That's been the sticking point in the past. The CODEC, to be legal,
is typically licensed from a patent pool, and since that costs money,
companies like Microsoft don't like to bundle what's needed.

But before running out and buying WinDVD or PowerDVD, it's a good
idea to check "behind the sofa cushions". People would be
surprised, how many bundled copies of DVD movie players,
are included with the computers they bought, or the
retail boxed optical drive they bought, or the retail
motherboard they bought. I have at least two CDs, one in a
motherboard box, another in a Samsung optical drive box, that
I can use if I need a movie player.

More examples here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PowerDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_player_comparison

In the FOSS world, software derived from FFMPEG and libavcodec,
has made playing movies possible. Which is why you don't have
to pay money for this. But if you wanted a fancy looking piece of
software, the commercial versions can be had for next to nothing,
if they're bundled with another product. That's how I got my two
copies.

There is a fair amount of variation, in how much CPU those
kinds of programs take. If the computer is really underpowered
(below 1.5GHz perhaps), then you have to be more careful when
picking software. Just any old piece of crap won't do, when
your computer is that weak. Some video cards, have acceleration
for a few movie formats (hardware decoder), and sometimes, that
can make a difference. The free software, doesn't always have the
driver or software path, to access that (it's because the necessary
specs to access the hardware, may not be available without an NDA
being signed). And this is where you get the benefits from
commercial software - they may have more than one method
of playing the movies, baked into their code.

If the computer at work is a powerful one, then you'd be
less dependent on the software being well designed.

Paul
Are you not endorsing the best one or did you leave it out because it
was already mentioned?
http://www.videolan.org
 
P

Peter Jason

Yes, but note the carefully worded caveat...

"If you have a DVD drive and a *compatible DVD decoder* installed
on your computer, you can use Windows Media Player to play a DVD-Video
disc — this is the type of DVD that movies are distributed on."

That's been the sticking point in the past. The CODEC, to be legal,
is typically licensed from a patent pool, and since that costs money,
companies like Microsoft don't like to bundle what's needed.

But before running out and buying WinDVD or PowerDVD, it's a good
idea to check "behind the sofa cushions". People would be
surprised, how many bundled copies of DVD movie players,
are included with the computers they bought, or the
retail boxed optical drive they bought, or the retail
motherboard they bought. I have at least two CDs, one in a
motherboard box, another in a Samsung optical drive box, that
I can use if I need a movie player.

More examples here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PowerDVD
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_player_comparison

In the FOSS world, software derived from FFMPEG and libavcodec,
has made playing movies possible. Which is why you don't have
to pay money for this. But if you wanted a fancy looking piece of
software, the commercial versions can be had for next to nothing,
if they're bundled with another product. That's how I got my two
copies.

There is a fair amount of variation, in how much CPU those
kinds of programs take. If the computer is really underpowered
(below 1.5GHz perhaps), then you have to be more careful when
picking software. Just any old piece of crap won't do, when
your computer is that weak. Some video cards, have acceleration
for a few movie formats (hardware decoder), and sometimes, that
can make a difference. The free software, doesn't always have the
driver or software path, to access that (it's because the necessary
specs to access the hardware, may not be available without an NDA
being signed). And this is where you get the benefits from
commercial software - they may have more than one method
of playing the movies, baked into their code.

If the computer at work is a powerful one, then you'd be
less dependent on the software being well designed.

Paul
I have got the "Media Center" to work with a DVD
but I have to do even more testing. I have Win7
SP1 with an Intel i7CPU and a videocard NVIDIA
GForceGTX480. This videocard has a small HDMI
output on it as well as two screen outputs.

The next question is how I should stream a movie
on to my HDD from the DVD movie as it is playing.
Is there some way to do this?

Peter
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul

Peter said:
I have got the "Media Center" to work with a DVD
but I have to do even more testing. I have Win7
SP1 with an Intel i7CPU and a videocard NVIDIA
GForceGTX480. This videocard has a small HDMI
output on it as well as two screen outputs.

The next question is how I should stream a movie
on to my HDD from the DVD movie as it is playing.
Is there some way to do this?

Peter
Well, that topic area is "DVD ripping". The content is
protected by various means. You can get programs, to make
copies. And on some optical drives, you can modify them to
remove the "RIP lock" (they don't run very fast, when you're
trying to copy a DVD video disc). Part of ripping, is getting
the optical drive to treat the disc as a data disc, and reading
it at maximum speed, rather than running at a sedate approximately
1x speed while you're trying to make a copy. If the drive
runs slow enough, it might take 2 hours to make a copy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_ripper

The only DVDs I have here, are ones I made myself (recording
with WinTV card), so I don't even have any first hand experience
with ripping. Or own any ripping programs. (Just, not interested.)

Another way to rip, would be to connect the computer output
to a "capture card". But the capture cards have restrictions
on the resolution they can copy. And DVI and HDMI video outputs
have the ability to use HDCP (encryption on the monitor cable),
to prevent making copies with a capture card. The VGA analog output,
or component video (YPbPr) aren't protected the same way. So in principle,
a capture card would be an easy, 1x (normal speed) ripping method.
But the DMCA in the States, is there to make aiding people to do
this, illegal. DVI, HDMI, VGA, Component YPbPr, are the high quality
outputs on the computer, while things like Composite or S-Video (four
pin cable), are inferior.

(Example of capture devices, which do *not* participate in HDCP. It
would be illegal for these devices to have an HDCP key, and make copies
of encrypted output. These cards and devices, can make copies of
video camera HDMI output which is not encrypted. Resolution is also
limited. I think the card does 1080i but not 1080p. And the USB3
version, needs a "good" USB3 port, as the bandwidth used is rather
high.)

http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity/techspecs/

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100148

(read customer reviews - they're using FRAPS program, to capture...)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049

On VCRs, there was Macrovision protection on some titles, to
screw up the sync, to make it hard to make copies. And Protected
Path, is the modern equivalent with computers. There are thus,
plenty of issues to learn about, before you can rip stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_Media_Path

Player software, is going to vary as to how well it continues
to protect the content. Ripping software, good ones, the developers
have a nominal "headquarters" outside the reach of US law (or, as
far away as they can get), to conduct their business. All to
prevent you from storing your media library on a hard drive.

Even the video card "mirror mode", was in some cases removed,
presumably to make it harder to connect capture devices. So
there's a roadblock, every step of the way. Which is why
ripping software is pretty popular.

Paul
 
P

Peter Jason

Well, that topic area is "DVD ripping". The content is
protected by various means. You can get programs, to make
copies. And on some optical drives, you can modify them to
remove the "RIP lock" (they don't run very fast, when you're
trying to copy a DVD video disc). Part of ripping, is getting
the optical drive to treat the disc as a data disc, and reading
it at maximum speed, rather than running at a sedate approximately
1x speed while you're trying to make a copy. If the drive
runs slow enough, it might take 2 hours to make a copy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_ripper

The only DVDs I have here, are ones I made myself (recording
with WinTV card), so I don't even have any first hand experience
with ripping. Or own any ripping programs. (Just, not interested.)

Another way to rip, would be to connect the computer output
to a "capture card". But the capture cards have restrictions
on the resolution they can copy. And DVI and HDMI video outputs
have the ability to use HDCP (encryption on the monitor cable),
to prevent making copies with a capture card. The VGA analog output,
or component video (YPbPr) aren't protected the same way. So in principle,
a capture card would be an easy, 1x (normal speed) ripping method.
But the DMCA in the States, is there to make aiding people to do
this, illegal. DVI, HDMI, VGA, Component YPbPr, are the high quality
outputs on the computer, while things like Composite or S-Video (four
pin cable), are inferior.

(Example of capture devices, which do *not* participate in HDCP. It
would be illegal for these devices to have an HDCP key, and make copies
of encrypted output. These cards and devices, can make copies of
video camera HDMI output which is not encrypted. Resolution is also
limited. I think the card does 1080i but not 1080p. And the USB3
version, needs a "good" USB3 port, as the bandwidth used is rather
high.)

http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity/techspecs/

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100148

(read customer reviews - they're using FRAPS program, to capture...)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049

On VCRs, there was Macrovision protection on some titles, to
screw up the sync, to make it hard to make copies. And Protected
Path, is the modern equivalent with computers. There are thus,
plenty of issues to learn about, before you can rip stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_Media_Path

Player software, is going to vary as to how well it continues
to protect the content. Ripping software, good ones, the developers
have a nominal "headquarters" outside the reach of US law (or, as
far away as they can get), to conduct their business. All to
prevent you from storing your media library on a hard drive.

Even the video card "mirror mode", was in some cases removed,
presumably to make it harder to connect capture devices. So
there's a roadblock, every step of the way. Which is why
ripping software is pretty popular.

Paul
Thanks.
Most DVDs can be ripped with DVD Decrypter, with
AnyDVD as a backup. Lately there are some
devilish new protections that fool such programs
into delivering a plurality of file sets, up to
seven, rendering subsequent burning software
overloaded. I've heard that 'compiling-a-DVD' is
required of 'Nero Recode' and that some of the
plurality of files must be selected manually in
the hope these will be sufficient. Even so, on
playback some trigger or other will switch a
section of the movie into repeat, so that one must
fast-forward through this. These matters are
often the talk at dinner parties.
 
P

Paul

Peter said:
Thanks.
Most DVDs can be ripped with DVD Decrypter, with
AnyDVD as a backup. Lately there are some
devilish new protections that fool such programs
into delivering a plurality of file sets, up to
seven, rendering subsequent burning software
overloaded. I've heard that 'compiling-a-DVD' is
required of 'Nero Recode' and that some of the
plurality of files must be selected manually in
the hope these will be sufficient. Even so, on
playback some trigger or other will switch a
section of the movie into repeat, so that one must
fast-forward through this. These matters are
often the talk at dinner parties.
Maybe that happens, when trying to preserve the DVD
in its entirety ? Menus and all ?

If you can remove the CSS, and get a collection of VOB
files, you should be able to re-master it (add your
own dummy menu). Maybe that would work.

Paul
 
W

...winston

Just an fyi for future planning.

Windows 8 requires Media Center to play DVD's.
Windows 8 includes Media Player but without DVD playback support

Windows 8 Pro is the minimum o/s for Media Center (and DVD playback)

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2012/05/03/making-windows-media-center-available-in-windows-8.aspx




--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"KCB" wrote in message

Peter Jason said:
I don't have a TV at work, and sometimes I want to
watch a movie rented from the DVD hire-shop on my
computer.

Is there any software to make this possible? I
don't want to buy a DVD player just for this.

Peter

Windows Media Player 12 is included in all versions of Windows 7, and will
play DVDs.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Play-a-CD-or-DVD-in-Windows-Media-Player
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top