Vista to Win7 upgrade


A

Andrew Rossmann

With Vista nearing the end of MS's mainstream support, I'm thinking of
updating my computer to Win7. Despite what the Vista-hate people say,
I've actually had no issues or crashes. This is 32-bit Vista Home
Premium.

I have run the Upgrade Advisor, and there no show-stoppers. Just a few
programs with warnings. I don't expect any real issues, but wonder what
issues others have seen. The main programs I see with warnings are
iTunes 10.5.2 (just noticed 10.5.3 is out, which is probably minor),
Sonicwall VPN client (to connect to work, although I can update it from
4.0 to 4.64 if needed), Citrix Program Manager 10.1, Outlook 2003,
Vitual PC 2007.

The advisor sometimes recomments uninstalling then reinstalling software
for some of these warnings, such as iTunes. Is this really necessary?
Any known issues with any of the above?
 
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K

Ken Blake

With Vista nearing the end of MS's mainstream support, I'm thinking of
updating my computer to Win7. Despite what the Vista-hate people say,
I've actually had no issues or crashes. This is 32-bit Vista Home
Premium.

I have run the Upgrade Advisor, and there no show-stoppers. Just a few
programs with warnings. I don't expect any real issues, but wonder what
issues others have seen.

I ran Vista from the time it came out until Windows 7 came out. Like
you, I had no problems with it at all.

Since Windows 7 came out, I've been running it, and there too, I've
had no problems at all; as much as I liked Vista, I like Windows 7
even more. With the exception of Windows Me, I've liked each version
more than its predecessor.
 
B

Bob I

I ran Vista from the time it came out until Windows 7 came out. Like
you, I had no problems with it at all.

Since Windows 7 came out, I've been running it, and there too, I've
had no problems at all; as much as I liked Vista, I like Windows 7
even more. With the exception of Windows Me, I've liked each version
more than its predecessor.
How similar to my thoughts. I think if Windows ME would not have been
the "stop gap" release it was, it may have been refined to be usable.
Sort of like Win 98 and SE. SE fixed the issues from 98. or Win 3.0 and 3.1.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Andrew.

Like Ken and Bob, I liked Vista and I also like Win7 better. Come on in;
the water's fine! ;<)

Upgrading from Vista x86 (32-bit) to Win7 x86 should be virtually painless.
But if you migrate from Vista x86 to Win7 x64 (or any 32-bit OS to any
64-bit OS), it will have to be a "custom install", which is a "clean
install". The 64-bit setup.exe will not even run if you are booted into
32-bit Windows so you can't just "upgrade". You will need to boot from the
64-bit DVD to install 64-bit Windows. Once 64-bit Win7 is installed,
though, your 32-bit apps should re-install and run with little or no hassle.
Run the WET (Windows Easy Transfer) tool from your old system first, storing
its output where it will be accessible later; then run WET again after
64-bit Win7 is installed to reinstall your apps and retrieve your data. But
if you are upgrading from 32-bit Vista to 32-bit Win7, just ignore this
paragraph.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Andrew Rossmann" wrote in message

With Vista nearing the end of MS's mainstream support, I'm thinking of
updating my computer to Win7. Despite what the Vista-hate people say,
I've actually had no issues or crashes. This is 32-bit Vista Home
Premium.

I have run the Upgrade Advisor, and there no show-stoppers. Just a few
programs with warnings. I don't expect any real issues, but wonder what
issues others have seen. The main programs I see with warnings are
iTunes 10.5.2 (just noticed 10.5.3 is out, which is probably minor),
Sonicwall VPN client (to connect to work, although I can update it from
4.0 to 4.64 if needed), Citrix Program Manager 10.1, Outlook 2003,
Vitual PC 2007.

The advisor sometimes recomments uninstalling then reinstalling software
for some of these warnings, such as iTunes. Is this really necessary?
Any known issues with any of the above?
 
W

...winston

Uninstall iTunes, reinstall iTunes post Win7 and only after you have ensured you internet connection works ( (10.5.2 will still
work. The message is not version related, it is due to presence of the iTunes software)
- do not let iTunes open after reinstall (iirc a check box is provided to not open). On first use, click the iTunes icon on the
desktop and hold the shift key down..it will provide a prompt to choose your library...point it to the library location (*.itl
file)

Uninstall Virtual PC and reinstall post Win7.

Outlook 2003 - what was the exact message ?

Sorry don't use Citric, Sonic VPN.



--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Andrew Rossmann" wrote in message
With Vista nearing the end of MS's mainstream support, I'm thinking of
updating my computer to Win7. Despite what the Vista-hate people say,
I've actually had no issues or crashes. This is 32-bit Vista Home
Premium.

I have run the Upgrade Advisor, and there no show-stoppers. Just a few
programs with warnings. I don't expect any real issues, but wonder what
issues others have seen. The main programs I see with warnings are
iTunes 10.5.2 (just noticed 10.5.3 is out, which is probably minor),
Sonicwall VPN client (to connect to work, although I can update it from
4.0 to 4.64 if needed), Citrix Program Manager 10.1, Outlook 2003,
Vitual PC 2007.

The advisor sometimes recomments uninstalling then reinstalling software
for some of these warnings, such as iTunes. Is this really necessary?
Any known issues with any of the above?
 
R

Rob

How similar to my thoughts. I think if Windows ME would not have been
the "stop gap" release it was, it may have been refined to be usable.
Sort of like Win 98 and SE. SE fixed the issues from 98. or Win 3.0 and
3.1.

Yet I ran ME and did not encounter any problems. W98 had a shutdown
problem for one.
 
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A

Andrew Rossmann

Uninstall Virtual PC and reinstall post Win7.
To be honest, I never really use it. I installed it mainly to try
something, but never got around to it. Being 32-bit, it's not really
necessary.
Outlook 2003 - what was the exact message ?
It just says 'not tested'.
 
B

Bob I

Yet I ran ME and did not encounter any problems. W98 had a shutdown
problem for one.
The main issue I saw was that there were too many background
applications installed on "big box" OEM machines. If you ran a lean
install it worked pretty much like Win98 SE, but there was still the
lack of control in the DOS based under carriage leading to anything and
everything getting installed as "drivers".
 
W

...winston

If V-PC is not needed removing it should be no big deal.

Office 2003 has a few compatibility issues with Win7. If not removed, it should at least be upgraded to its latest Service Pack
(Sp3) prior to installing Win7 but for the most part presence of Office Sp3 should not present any major issues

One item unique to all Office 2003 programs..
- Office 2003 code doesn't recognize Win7's Libraries since its open/save dialogs use its own file browser dialogs instead of
Windows.

Outlook 2003 has some post Win7 installation issues. Are you using Outlook for mail ?

Also see:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/co.../Search.aspx?l=en&type=Software&s=Office 2003
If the above link is broken use
- http://tinyurl.com/6w45k4d

--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Andrew Rossmann" wrote in message
Uninstall Virtual PC and reinstall post Win7.
To be honest, I never really use it. I installed it mainly to try
something, but never got around to it. Being 32-bit, it's not really
necessary.
Outlook 2003 - what was the exact message ?
It just says 'not tested'.
 
K

Ken Blake

Hi, Andrew.

Like Ken and Bob, I liked Vista and I also like Win7 better. Come on in;
the water's fine! ;<)

Upgrading from Vista x86 (32-bit) to Win7 x86 should be virtually painless.
But if you migrate from Vista x86 to Win7 x64 (or any 32-bit OS to any
64-bit OS), it will have to be a "custom install", which is a "clean
install". The 64-bit setup.exe will not even run if you are booted into
32-bit Windows so you can't just "upgrade". You will need to boot from the
64-bit DVD to install 64-bit Windows. Once 64-bit Win7 is installed,
though, your 32-bit apps should re-install and run with little or no hassle.

Just one clarification here, RC: Once 64-bit Win7 is installed,
though, *most of* your 32-bit apps should re-install and run with
little or no hassle. Some don't, and those that don't are usually
either older apps or utilities.
 
L

Leala

With Vista nearing the end of MS's mainstream support, I'm thinking of
updating my computer to Win7. Despite what the Vista-hate people say,
I've actually had no issues or crashes. This is 32-bit Vista Home
Premium.

I have run the Upgrade Advisor, and there no show-stoppers. Just a few
programs with warnings. I don't expect any real issues, but wonder what
issues others have seen. The main programs I see with warnings are
iTunes 10.5.2 (just noticed 10.5.3 is out, which is probably minor),
Sonicwall VPN client (to connect to work, although I can update it from
4.0 to 4.64 if needed), Citrix Program Manager 10.1, Outlook 2003,
Vitual PC 2007.

The advisor sometimes recomments uninstalling then reinstalling software
for some of these warnings, such as iTunes. Is this really necessary?
Any known issues with any of the above?
What's the rush, Vista will be supported until April 11, 2017.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/products/lifecycle

Save some money by that time Windows 10 will probaly be on the verge of
coming out.
 
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A

Andrew Rossmann

If V-PC is not needed removing it should be no big deal.

Office 2003 has a few compatibility issues with Win7. If not removed, it should at least be upgraded to its latest Service Pack
(Sp3) prior to installing Win7 but for the most part presence of Office Sp3 should not present any major issues

One item unique to all Office 2003 programs..
- Office 2003 code doesn't recognize Win7's Libraries since its open/save dialogs use its own file browser dialogs instead of
Windows.

Outlook 2003 has some post Win7 installation issues. Are you using Outlook for mail ?

Also see:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/co.../Search.aspx?l=en&type=Software&s=Office 2003
If the above link is broken use
- http://tinyurl.com/6w45k4d
I have a basic Office 2007 install (Excel, Word, PowerPoint). The
Outlook is if I want to check my work mail. As long as it works well
enough to access the Exchange server, it's OK. At the worst, I could
start up my work computer, or use Citrix/Remote Desktop to one of those
servers.

I use Thunderbird for my personal mail, and I know that has no problems.
I don't know if it has Exchange support yet.
 
A

Andy Burns

Andrew said:
I use Thunderbird for my personal mail, and I know that has no problems.
I don't know if it has Exchange support yet.
Only directly if the exchange server has POP3 or (preferably) IMAP4
protocol enabled, there are also add-ons that allow Lightning to access
exchange calendars via the web interface.

There is a proprietary add-on called ExQuilla that hooks Thunderbird
into an exchange mailbox via the web interface.
 
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W

...winston

Office 2007 and Outlook 2003 you should be fine...as noted Outlook 03 has some issues, easily found by searching the net for
Outlook 03 Win7 Compatibility - the majority are not show stoppers.

Still a good idea to remove iTunes prior to upgrading to Win7 then reinstall later :)

Good luck!


--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Andrew Rossmann" wrote in message
If V-PC is not needed removing it should be no big deal.

Office 2003 has a few compatibility issues with Win7. If not removed, it should at least be upgraded to its latest Service Pack
(Sp3) prior to installing Win7 but for the most part presence of Office Sp3 should not present any major issues

One item unique to all Office 2003 programs..
- Office 2003 code doesn't recognize Win7's Libraries since its open/save dialogs use its own file browser dialogs instead of
Windows.

Outlook 2003 has some post Win7 installation issues. Are you using Outlook for mail ?

Also see:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/co.../Search.aspx?l=en&type=Software&s=Office 2003
If the above link is broken use
- http://tinyurl.com/6w45k4d
I have a basic Office 2007 install (Excel, Word, PowerPoint). The
Outlook is if I want to check my work mail. As long as it works well
enough to access the Exchange server, it's OK. At the worst, I could
start up my work computer, or use Citrix/Remote Desktop to one of those
servers.

I use Thunderbird for my personal mail, and I know that has no problems.
I don't know if it has Exchange support yet.
 

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