N Camp Road temp


J

Jussi

Good Morning Karl,
We recorded 10.0 degrees at 6:49 PM on Wednesday and it shot up to a
balmy 24.3 degrees at 8:55 AM on this Thursday Morning.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Good Morning Karl,
We recorded 10.0 degrees at 6:49 PM on Wednesday and it shot up to a
balmy 24.3 degrees at 8:55 AM on this Thursday Morning.
Degrees Fahrenheit, Celsius, Rankine, Réaumur, or Kelvin?
 
V

VanguardLH

Gene E. Bloch said:
Degrees Fahrenheit, Celsius, Rankine, Réaumur, or Kelvin?
You forgot the Rømer, Newton, and Delisle scales. Tis probably one of
your first two choices depending on which country Jussi grew up but then
consider that Jussi is likely to be boasting about it being cold at his
place so Celsius wouldn't apply (see below). Jussi's North Camp Road
might be at:

Ishpeming Township, Marquette, MI 49849
Wells, Marquette, MI 49831
Bernadotte Township, Fulton, IL 61441
Fairchild, Eau Claire, WI 54741
Clinton, Ottawa, OH 43452

Yet all those locales show temperatures of 21-38 F at 6:50 PM yesterday.
From http://www.nws.noaa.gov/xml/tpex/scs.php, the only match on Jussi's
claim (if he's in the USA) is for Anchorage, Alaska. Maybe he's in
Greenland. Nope, it was 34/26 F (max/min) at Narsarsuaq, Greenland
yesterday. More important than what temperature scale Jussi was using
(which can be deduced) is for WHERE he was reporting. Must be an inside
thing between him and Karl.

I doubt Jussi is posting from the moon where Kelvin might be more common
amongst the lunar folks there but then Celsius is just a bias point on
the Kelvin scale like Fahrenheit is on the Rankine scale. Since Jussi
is able to post strongly indicates that it wasn't 10 degrees Kelvin or
Rankine at his place. In fact, 10 Celsius wouldn't be anything to boast
about as being so cold as to waste posting about it. Working on
finishing a new huge garage build would be easy peasy at 10 Celsius or
Réaumur than at 10 Fahrenheit. We wouldn't need to heat up the garage
(nearly enclosed with tarps over the peak and doors) to warm up the roof
to lay down the rest of ice dam and we wouldn't have to wear jackets.
Hell, we'd take 10 Rømer if we could get it. If it were 10 Newton, our
family would go on a picnic at a nearby pavilion, take along a box fan
(since there are outlets there), and put on sunscreen so I doubt Jussi
is boasting about that temperature. If you look at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rankine_scale#Conversion_table_between_the_different_temperature_units

then the only temperature of "10" that Jussi would be boasting about as
being cold (well, uncomfortable chilly since I doubt he's outside while
nude) would be on the Fahrenheit scale. I am making the assumption that
Jussi, while posting off-topic here, is a human.

There are plenty of Terra locales with far colder temperatures today
and, no, we don't need their off-topic diary entries here, either. I
suspect Dome A, Antarctica has them all beat. From the following
history, it looks like they're in their blistering -30 C (-22 F) spring
season. For equivalence (to Jussi and his late fall season report),
their late fall season has them around -75 C (-103 F).

http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/fact-files/weather/automatic-weather-stations/dome-a-details
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

You forgot the Rømer, Newton, and Delisle scales.
Very generous of you. Maybe I just didn't know :)

Do you happen to know whether Galileo have a scale of his own for his
glass float thermometer? It's showing up again in Christmas catalogs
(AKA seasonal snail SPAM).

For brevity, I clipped your thorough essay. Some of it was informative
(I'm serious, a little), and some of it seemed to be gentle humor. I'll
assume it was meant just that way :)
 
V

VanguardLH

Gene E. Bloch said:
Very generous of you. Maybe I just didn't know :)

Do you happen to know whether Galileo have a scale of his own for his
glass float thermometer? It's showing up again in Christmas catalogs
(AKA seasonal snail SPAM).
Would that be Galileo's air thermometer (thermoscope) which had no scale
(since temperature wasn't yet considered a measurable quantity) or the
floating balls (Galilean aka gourd) thermometer invented later by some
academics to demonstate temperature on liquid density?

The "scale" for a Galilean thermometer is variable depending on who
manufactures the floats. They settle based on their weight which can be
whatever the maker choose for a float. A float might find equality in
density in the fluid at a 10, 12, 15 degree mark or whatever the maker
wants (who also determines if the degrees are F or C scaled). Of
course, for mass sales, you'd probably want the floats to be at a scale
of the audience to which the product targets a market. Since the tube
can only hold a small number of floats, this thermometer is only for
decoration. You might be able to tell a temperature of 76 F for one
ball floating in the middle with the others at the top and bottom but
you won't find out the temperature that is between. If there are 6
balls then you can determine all of 6 temperatures. For some models,
intermediate temperatures are the average of the lowest value at the top
and the highest values at the bottom (assuming linearity in density
change across the fluid). This thermometer has a narrow range of
measurement, like from 8 to 16 degrees each (i.e., one will measure
18-26F, another measures 64-80F, and so on). If they were to measure a
greater range, there wouldn't be enough space for the floats inside the
tube which means just a few floats and very little granularity in
measurement - unless you had a h-u-g-e tube with lots of floats. While
I've seen where a set of multiple Galilean thermometers were used to
cover multiple ranges of temperatures, the largest that I've personally
seen was a couple feet tall and probably had only a dozen balls inside
which supposedly gave you a 1/2 C granularity but I don't remember the
temperature range.

For where I've seen someone have this type of thermometer, it was more
of science art than used as a thermometer. In fact, in one household
where they had one, they still went to the indoor/outdoor thermometer to
check on temperature and never even thought of looking at the Galilean
one.

(And, yes, I'm having fun with this, not nitpicking your choices.)
For brevity, I clipped your thorough essay. Some of it was informative
(I'm serious, a little), and some of it seemed to be gentle humor. I'll
assume it was meant just that way :)
Actually it was merely to point out that someone reporting a nippy
temperature of 10 could have the temperature scale deduced by
elimination of what a value of 10 would mean on each scale. On all
scales other than Fahrenheit, 10 degrees wouldn't be considered nippy
cold but either pleasant, very warm, or impossible to survive.

I figure Jussi accidentally posted into the wrong newsgroup (so I won't
be surprised if he/she never replies here). He and Karl probably
inhabitate a different newsgroup and Jussi meant to post there.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Would that be Galileo's air thermometer (thermoscope) which had no scale
(since temperature wasn't yet considered a measurable quantity) or the
floating balls (Galilean aka gourd) thermometer invented later by some
academics to demonstate temperature on liquid density?
From my post: "glass float thermometer".
The "scale" for a Galilean thermometer is variable depending on who
manufactures the floats. They settle based on their weight which can be
whatever the maker choose for a float. A float might find equality in
density in the fluid at a 10, 12, 15 degree mark or whatever the maker
wants (who also determines if the degrees are F or C scaled).
By "scale", I meant Fahrenheit, Celsius, etc, or Galileo's own, not
which temperatures (in the chosen scale) go on which floats.

For where I've seen someone have this type of thermometer, it was more
of science art than used as a thermometer. In fact, in one household
where they had one, they still went to the indoor/outdoor thermometer to
check on temperature and never even thought of looking at the Galilean
one.

(And, yes, I'm having fun with this, not nitpicking your choices.)


Actually it was merely to point out that someone reporting a nippy
temperature of 10 could have the temperature scale deduced by
elimination of what a value of 10 would mean on each scale. On all
scales other than Fahrenheit, 10 degrees wouldn't be considered nippy
cold but either pleasant, very warm, or impossible to survive.
It was well beyond obvious to me that the scale was Fahrenheit; I just
was having fun teasing the OP for leaving out the scale specification.
OP: if you're reading this, I forgive you. Really! :)
I figure Jussi accidentally posted into the wrong newsgroup (so I won't
be surprised if he/she never replies here). He and Karl probably
inhabitate a different newsgroup and Jussi meant to post there.
Pretty much the same here: I thought that he or she meant to e-mail it,
and I also figured there'd be no replies here :)

The OP's name is Jussi. Jussi Bjoerling was a famous tenor a few decades
ago. Danish, IIRC.

OK, Google to the rescue: Swedish, died 1960, and his surname seems to
have o-umlaut instead of oe. Also, Jussi is short for Johan Jonatan.
 
P

Paul

VanguardLH said:
I figure Jussi accidentally posted into the wrong newsgroup (so I won't
be surprised if he/she never replies here). He and Karl probably
inhabitate a different newsgroup and Jussi meant to post there.
This is the second time Jussi has done this.

I'm thinking coded transmission at this point.

In a group that happens to not be archived on Google.

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

This is the second time Jussi has done this.

I'm thinking coded transmission at this point.

In a group that happens to not be archived on Google.

Paul
The revolution is starting?
 
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V

VanguardLH

Paul said:
This is the second time Jussi has done this.

I'm thinking coded transmission at this point.

In a group that happens to not be archived on Google.
Hmm, I remember hearing references to the "38th parallel" in war movies.
Maybe it was about the Korean War. Wasn't that just used in a James
Bond movie (the one with Halle Berry in it)? Yeah, "Die Another Day".
As the solar space collector was burning everything up on the North
Korea side, the US agents were saying they were going to war if the beam
crossed the 38th parallel (north) or the DMZ.

So where might be the 10th parallel north where there exists bloody
conflict or high political tension?

tension?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10th_parallel_north

Geez, that crosses so many hot spots (in temperature and temperament)
that there's no sure way to know to what area the coded message
referred. The only one with North or South listed there is South Sudan.
Sudan is to the north. What are they going to fight over besides what
they they are already fighting over (the oil fight)? Maybe who has more
or better "rights" to setup the terrorist training camps or can profit
from military support logistics to those camps (supplying them with
food, toilet paper, clothing, ammo)?

And the plot thickens.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Gene E. Bloch said:
It was well beyond obvious to me that the scale was Fahrenheit; I just
was having fun teasing the OP for leaving out the scale specification.
I'd find 10°C definitely on the cool side, though might or might not
call it nippy dependent on the amount of wind; 10°F I'd definitely find
nippy!
[]
The OP's name is Jussi. Jussi Bjoerling was a famous tenor a few decades
ago. Danish, IIRC.

OK, Google to the rescue: Swedish, died 1960, and his surname seems to
have o-umlaut instead of oe. Also, Jussi is short for Johan Jonatan.
If Danish, probably more likely an o with a slash?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The reason for the oil shortage: nobody remembered to check the oil levels. Our
oil is located in the North Sea but our dip-sticks are located in Westminster.
(or Texas and Washington etc. - adjust as necessary!)
 
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