Microsoft to Ship Windows 7 Service Pack in 2011


Nibiru2012

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From: Datamation July 21, 2010

Fresh on the heels of the beginning of beta testing for the first service pack for Windows 7, Microsoft is now confirming that it will ship the final version next year.

A week after Microsoft began officially beta testing the first service pack for Windows 7, it has revealed that it's planning to ship the final version sometime during the first half of next year.

Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) had not said when to expect Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) to be formally released, but given that the SP1 beta was released broadly last week at the company's Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC) in Washington, many observers had expected it to debut as early as the end of 2010.

"It [SP1] will be released sometime in the first half of calendar year 2011, meaning sometime after January 1, 2011," a Microsoft spokesperson confirmed in an e-mail to InternetNews.com.

Historically, release of the first Service Pack for a new version of Windows, with its myriad fixes and improvements, has been the metaphorical starting gun for many corporate IT staffs to begin testing and deployment in earnest. However, early response to Windows 7 has been so positive -- Microsoft has already sold more than 150 million licenses -- that indications from the market point to many organizations choosing not to wait until SP1 arrives.

In fact, Microsoft credited strong sales of Windows 7 -- both at retail and to enterprise customers -- as driving the company's financial performance in its third fiscal quarter, which ended March 31, to new records. A repeat of that performance is expected Thursday, when Microsoft reports its fourth fiscal quarter and year-end financial results.
Service Packs typically only include bug and security fixes, and are expected to be more solid and reliable than the original release. That's true of Windows 7 SP1 but its sibling, Windows Server 2008 Release 2 (R2) SP1, adds a pair of new features designed to work better in a cloud computing environment.

One feature, called Remote FX, aims to provide 3D graphics for remote users, while the other, named Dynamic Memory, enables systems administrators to throttle memory use without causing performance problems.

Company executives have gone out of their way at every turn to suggest that the original release of Windows 7 -- the "release to manufacturing," or RTM, edition -- is solid and reliable enough that it advocates that large customers not wait for SP1. For instance, in a Q&A posted online, the company declared that Windows 7 is a "high-quality release."

"SP1 will include all updates previously available to Windows 7 users through Windows Update, so there is no reason to wait or delay their use of Windows 7," the Q&A continued.

SOURCE
 
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catilley1092

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In other words, we probably don't even need SP1, according to the post. Some of these updates I had to remove after a clean install, there were a couple that made my screen a little blurry. Fortunately, I created a restore point as soon as I installed 7, and the first three updates were installed, so I could undo the problem.

This same thing happened when I installed Vista, I had a crystal clear screen after the initial round of updates, and a hardware update afterward made it blurry.

I'll make sure that I create a restore point before accepting this SP, or test it out of one of my evaluation versions first. That way, I can see what will happen, before installing it on my main OS. I'm now beginning to understand why some users refuse SP's until they have to take it, like recently, XP SP2 users had to upgrade to SP3, or get no new updates.

My computer runs the way I want it to, and I intend to keep it that way.

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Nibiru2012,
very informative post thank you for posting this as you saved me doing the same its So very true,I was also sent this yesterday which was a let down we have to wait still for almost 6 months.I did download the beta onto my test PC & for what it's worth I only noticed 1 change which was it went straight for the most important job first thing?ACTIVATION check

Activation,mine was. a genuine RTM release being 2 DVD''s Company executives have gone out of their way at every turn to suggest that the original release of Windows 7 -- the "release to manufacturing," or RTM, edition -- is solid and reliable enough that it advocates that large customers not wait for SP1. For instance, in a Q&A posted online, the company declared that Windows 7 is a "high-quality release."

"SP1 will include all updates previously available to Windows 7 users through Windows Update, so there is no reason to wait or delay their use of Windows 7," the Q&A continued.


Great Q & A i have also been hearing that XP has an extension of support,I believe it will be around same date October 22nd 2010,Prior to shipping Windows 7, we communicated that end-user downgrade rights provided in the software license terms of Windows 7 Professional or Windows 7 Ultimate editions preinstalled on a new PC would allow a customer to downgrade to either Windows XP Professional or similar Windows Vista versions for 18 months, or until the availability of SP1, whichever came sooner. Generally, PC manufacturers are in the process of ramping down Windows XP downgrade facilitation options that some offer today. As background, an OEM’s ability to generally offer downgrade facilitation options (e.g., preinstalling Windows XP Professional on a new PC that includes end-user rights for Windows 7 Professional) ends on October 22, 2010.

Many of the Microsoft watchers and customers I know have been expecting Microsoft to ship the first service pack (SP) for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 before the end of 2010.
But according to a newly published Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document on the Microsoft TechNet site, Microsoft is planning to release SP1 in the first half of 2011.

Let me say upfront that this statement doesn’t necessarily mean that Microsoft won’t deliver SP1 this year. The Windows team is still chanting the underpromise/overdeliver mantra. With recent Windows releases, the team has provided estimated delivery dates that were considerably later than what they expected they could achieve, in order to make sure there were no (public) missed ship dates. So despite the latest proclamation, it’s still hard to say for sure if SP1 will be a 2010 or a 2011 deliverable.
Here’s an excerpt from the TechNet FAQ, which addresses SP1 timing:
Q: When will SP1 be released?
A: Service Pack 1 will be released within the first half of calendar year 2011.
(And here’s a screen capture including this, in case someone at Microsoft gets overzealous in editing the site after I publish this post. Hey, accidents happen….)

(click on the text box above to enlarge)
Microsoft officials have been adamant that consumers and business customers don’t need to wait for SP1 to deploy Windows 7 and/or Windows Server 2008 R2. Still, a number of business customers use the release of SP1 as a milestone in terms of planning their deployments of a new operating system.
Last week, Microsoft released a public beta of SP1. (The Windows team released a private beta to selected testers a week or two before this.) Microsoft officials have said repeatedly that there will be no new features in Windows 7 SP1 and two new virtualization features in the server SP1 variant.

In reality, Windows 7 SP1 includes a few pieces of functionality that Microsoft hasn’t made available via Windows Update or through various security patches. Company officials still insist these are “enhancements,” rather than new features.These “enhancements” include things such as support for more third-party federation services; improved HDMI audio device support; and XPS printing fixes.
Any businesses out there waiting on SP1? Why or why not?
Update: Microsoft actually posted the “first half 2011″ date as part of a (much longer) blog post about the beta availability of SP1 back on July 12 on the Windows Blog. (Looks like I wasn’t the only one who missed it, based on reader feedback I’m getting.) The new rumored target date is supposedly April 2011, I hear. Not sure why it will take that long for something that doesn’t include new features (maybe it’s more an issue of the server SP1 holding up the client?)… But there you have it.

Based on their own information,the Beta released to holders of RTM & win server R2 2008 were almost identicle Except for the 2 additions to win server R2 2008 of which (The Windows team released a private beta to selected testers a week or two before this.) Microsoft officials have said repeatedly that there will be no new features in Windows 7 SP1 and two new virtualization features in the server SP1 variant.

speaking of variants,Just about every Microsoft w7 team staff will only give us a hint at SP1,The rumored final release data for SP1 (not confirmed by Microsoft officially) is Q4 2010.Officials said earlier this year that SP1 for Windows 7 won’t include any new features; it will be a rollup of fixes.yes thats right everything we all needed to hear so when I looked at this Beta I have noticed no changes what so ever except for win server R2 2008. Oh and the activation check on all win 7 copies.

In all I will be happy to see all the free copies of w7 out there be shut down as all of us that have to pay huge dollars for it makes me feel better that while I am paying for my O/S then so should everyone else,I hope you all feel same way as I do regards to Pirate copies of windows 7.

have a good read again thanks Nibiru2012 great source

respectfully
jeffreyobrien(JOB)
 

Nibiru2012

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I had a crystal clear screen after the initial round of updates, and a hardware update afterward made it blurry.
I never use the Windows hardware updates at all, unless they're the only one available. I always use the latest drivers from the actual hardware makers.

Many times the Windows hardware updates are several months old.

I'm now beginning to understand why some users refuse SP's until they have to take it, like recently, XP SP2 users had to upgrade to SP3, or get no new updates.
With Windows XP those service packs were major improvements over the previous OS release and prior SPs. My system always ran better and smoother after each release of the SP. The 32-bit version had three SP releases and the x64 version had two SP releases.
 
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clifford_cooley

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Many times the Windows hardware updates are several months old.
And still want to update your newer drivers that you downloaded just the day before.

Use Windows Update and then download the latest drivers from ATI or nVidia, next thing you know Windows Update is wanting to update the same old drivers again.
 

Nibiru2012

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And still want to update your newer drivers that you downloaded just the day before.

Use Windows Update and then download the latest drivers from ATI or nVidia, next thing you know Windows Update is wanting to update the same old drivers again.

That's a TRUE story! Windows Updates can be quite insistent, but thankfully it gives the option to "Hide Update" which helps.

It kept wanting to update my new ViewSonic monitor with drivers from 11-09, but showing a release date of 4-10 so it apparently thought it was a new driver rather than what I was already using which is exactly the same driver aka version number.
 
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And still want to update your newer drivers that you downloaded just the day before.

Use Windows Update and then download the latest drivers from ATI or nVidia, next thing you know Windows Update is wanting to update the same old drivers again.
And still want to update your newer drivers that you downloaded just the day before,Just yesterday Hewlett & Packard website released 2 new updates, my ethernet adapter driver as well Lightscribe driver for my DVDRW,what I noticed was that after they were installed and I re booted to make sure all was right I run windows update and to my suprise win 7 update was running that same ethernet driver update not the lightscribe,so with regards to your comment I see updates that happen even after the Hewlett & Packard updater does its Job.
 

catilley1092

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XP has already been given an extension of support, it ends on April 8, 2014. Does this mean that some users will have support after that date, and some won't? I've read a couple of things recently, there was mention of support through 2016 and another through 2020. XP will be nearly 20 years old by then, can you imagine how long an install (or reinstall) & updates will take? All day!

Many software updates, like the .net 3.5 Family and the newer 4.0 client has to be manually downloaded, then a rescan will load you up with a lot more updates. I know, because I just last night installed XP Media Center Edition (a modified XP Pro) on my notebook. Even at high speed internet, updating takes some time & effort to do, and I'm quite experienced at installing XP to know this, having only done about 120 or more installs of the OS.

If MS allows this for some, they will have to support all, out of fairness to everyone. XP users paid for their OS's, just as those who purchase 7 Pro or Ultimate, and for some strange reason, wants to take two steps backwards by downgrading. Why pay all that money for a pre-installed Pro or Ultimate PC (these would not be cheap computers), and load XP on it?

Seems like a lot of money would be saved to keep what they already have.

Cat
 
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catilley,

As of April 14th (you know, the day before we give the government all our money), Microsoft will change the support status of XP from mainstream to extended. When that happens, all users will continue to get security patch updates, but hot fixes and any larger upgrades to the operating system will only be provided to companies that are paying for them. In other words, Microsoft will not be making any more functional enhancements to XP for users like you and me, when it switches to extended support.
What does this mean to you? First, you better upgrade to XP, Service Pack 3 as soon as you can (if you have not already). Once Microsoft pulls that you may not be able to get it. Read the XP FAQ about this release for more information as well as direct links to the site.

Also, once you have upgraded to XP SP3, backup your computer with this new software installed – just in case the unimaginable happens. My advice to back up your computer should not be a surprise to you, if you have been following my blog for any time. Always be safe or you’ll be sorry.
XP will still be around until 2014. By that time we will all probably have different computers with Windows Whatever System on it. Until then, XP holdouts will need to do a bit more of the support work if they want to keep using XP for a few more years.
again I emailed steve here in sydney as well mary Jo to see if they know any more for you catilley until then m8 stay cool its not over yet m8
regards
jeffrey
 
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catilley1092

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Thanks Jeffrey, I've already installed SP3, as well as all other available updates for XP Media Center (whether or not I needed them all). And have backed up everything.

In fact, I still have my last two full backups of the notebook, so now I have three separate configurations of OS's backed up, one of which has the last four generations of Windows, and six VM's, all on one 100GB (93GB usable) drive. So if I get tired of what I have, I have two others to fall back on. But I like the XP Media Center better than any version of XP that I've had, so I'm probably going to stick with it.

Thanks for the advice, I learned a long time ago (the hard way) to backup. I had a notebook, the same make & model as the one I now have, I had a family picture album on it. I had read about backing up, but didn't quite understand the importance of it. I installed Ubuntu (a Linux OS) in a unconventional manner, through Wubi, a large file inside of Windows. You even have a choice as to what you want to boot into. But it was a serious and costly mistake on my part to do such an install, and leave it there. Anyway, I was in Ubuntu, and there was a program called "computer janitor", to make it look as a fresh install. That particular function wiped out my Windows install, destroying several critical files, I remember something about a hal dll, and something about the pagefile sys. They were gone. MS technical support couldn't even help me, it was that far gone.

From that point on, I learned to backup my Windows OS's, and to install Linux on a separate partition (or VM). It was my first experience with Linux, it did leave a bad taste in my mouth, as to what happened, but in the end realized it was my fault for not backing up. At the time, I was a subscriber to a weekly newsletter (Ask Leo), and even then, he preached backing up every week, and still does today. It's one of the most crucial things that any computer user should do, just as much as having AV protection is.

Cat
 

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