SOLVED IE9 adds key HTML5 features in new preview release


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IE9 adds key HTML5 features in new preview release,

Microsoft has just passed an important milestone on the road to shipping Internet Explorer 9, releasing a third Platform Preview for download by the public today.
This preview adds the most eagerly awaited HTML5 features to the IE9 engine, including support for the Canvas element and both audio and video tags. Based on test results I’ve seen, there are also significant performance improvements and a big jump in IE9’s score on the controversial Acid3 test page (although it still falls short of a perfect score). Like its two predecessors, this release contains only the most rudimentary user interface, allowing Microsoft to keep the dialog with developers focused on performance, standards compliance, and support for new HTML5 features.
What’s most remarkable about today’s announcement is that Microsoft is running well ahead of its initial, self-imposed schedule. The public promise by IE boss Dean Hachamovitch back in March was to deliver a new platform release every eight weeks. The first public release was on March 16, followed by a second release 50 days later, on May 5. Today’s release is exactly seven weeks after that. My colleague Mary Jo Foley says her sources are telling her this is the last platform release, and that the next milestone is a public beta in August. Based on the cadence Microsoft has established so far, that timetable makes sense: the next release should be ready on or perhaps a little before August 18, which is eight weeks from today.
Two weeks ago, in a series of meetings in Redmond, I saw this release in action and asked whether it was feature complete. “Almost,” I was told. Certainly the last major pieces of HTML5 support are now in place with the unveiling of support for the Canvas element and audio and video tags. That means that IE9 can perform hardware-assisted playback of H.264-encoded video on any Windows PC. In theory, at least, it should be able to pass every one of the HTML5 tests based on those features, which it previously failed. If there are any other serious omissions, we should hear about them within days, given the scrutiny this release will get from the developer community. (According to Microsoft, the two previous platform previews have been downloaded more than 2 million times. I expect this release to blow well past those numbers.)
With today’s Platform Preview 3 release, Microsoft also updated its IE9 Test Drive website, adding another 15 demos that show off some of the new HTML5 features and also demonstrating performance gains achieved with the help of a rewritten JavaScript engine and GPU-accelerated graphics. A bookstore demonstration from Amazon’s website, built using the HTML5 Canvas feature, is particularly impressive with its ability to open a book and flip through its pages, and another third-party demo from IMDb.com does a nice job of highlighting video playback. You’ll find a few frivolous demos as well (swimming fish and even a Potato Gun game) that show off some serious features.


The real proof, of course, will come when independent testers compare the new IE9 build to Safari 5 and Google Chrome using not only Microsoft’s test pages, but Apple’s test pages and those from third-party sites as well. Microsoft is sticking firmly with the goals it outlined back in November when it first demoed IE9 at the Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles. The “same markup” mantra is still at the center of Microsoft’s design, with the goal of delivering a final release that has the best, most interoperable support for HTML5. The core design principle is that HTML5 markup will render the same in IE9 as it does in any other modern, standards-compliant browser, with no compromises in performance, and developers won’t have to treat it as a separate platform or version.
Update 23-Jun 3PM PDT: I just downloaded and installed the IE9 PP3 code and loaded the Amazon Shelf test page in IE9 and in the current shipping release of Google Chrome, on a system with an i7-920 CPU and an Nvidia GeForce 9600GS. Performance is blazing fast on the IE9 platform, with crisp transition effects and very snappy loads. On Chrome, which does not support GPU acceleration, performance is almost unbearably slow, and font rendering is inferior as well. Be sure to check the source code, which notes that the page is primarily driven by JavaScript and Canvas. There’s an equally dramatic performance difference on the IMDb Video Panorama page.

Link:http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/ie9-adds-key-html5-features-in-new-preview-release/2250?tag=nl.e539


Good read
regards
jeffreyobrien
 
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catilley1092

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Did you see those clips of movies in the IE9 preview? They are much better than those seen in the Windows Media Center, where I can stream internet TV. It appears as if they are going after Apple with this kind of video performance. I hope the project succeeds, I'm not a IE fan, as many here knows, but I'm a Microsoft fan, and hope to see their projects go well.

Should this succeed, and there's no reason to believe it won't, Firefox (which has launched their own project), Google, Opera & Safari (which isn't as great as one may think, after my recent experience trying it out) are all going to have to step up to the plate once again. Google may have trouble, their experience is in web searches (which I credit them for), but their browser and especially their OS is pure crap. Don't take my word for it, download the OS and see for yourself. It makes a new computer look bad.

This has the potential to rekindle the browser wars all over again. Apple's Safari looks good, but was designed for Apple products, and if I remember correctly, on this very forum, users of the product ran into malicious code. I only used it for less than 15 minutes on my notebook and found that out fast. Had I been using Firefox, the disaster wouldn't have happened. This goes to show, if it's not safe on a Mac OS, it's certainly not going to be safe on Windows. I'll never use it again, period.

Opera is certainly speedy, and there's a mobile version of it, too. I've used the browser, and although I had nothing against it, there's no appeal there. They do have a "speed dial" function, and it's not really a bad browser. The problem with Opera is the lack of eye candy. Users wants that as much as anything, and that's why they will always be in last place. But there's hope for Opera, Linux Mint (and other Linux OS's) offers Opera as an option for the few that doesn't like Firefox. And Opera is popular in parts of Europe. They have a good free email system, I've never had a problem with Opera Web Mail.

Firefox, IE's main competition, will either surpass IE to take the #1 position, or will always be a thorn in IE's side. They had a slow start, but their following has grown larger and larger over the last couple of years. Once well known as a RAM hog, 3.5RC buried that past for them. And they had some help along the way to their present position. Netscape, a former enemy (from the original browser wars) of IE, in their final days, asked their users to adopt Firefox. AOL tried to pick up the pieces of Netscape, but it was too little, too late. Firefox was the largest benefactor of the AOL / Netscape fallout. Most didn't want to return to IE, so this is what jump started Firefox's growth. And that growth is continuing today. Firefox offers many addons to their browser, and usable ones, too. Such as a real ad blocker in Adblock Plus, real security in No Script, they have over 5,000 add ons from which to choose, including adding Bing as their search engine (Google is the default one), and a IE tab for viewing pages that you must use IE for. So much to choose from. Too, they have recently shown IE that they have a developmental department, by announcing a project similar to IE's platform preview. With Firefox 3.6.4, there's more power in it than the average user knows what to do with. For the skilled user, the sky's the limit with Firefox. And when FF's security is in jeopardy, they act fast, working as a team until it's resolved. And while FF has a large following, Mozilla, their parent company, operates differently from Microsoft.

First, Mozilla is heavily dependent on volunteers (us beta testers, and developers) and donations to keep the project rolling. Unlike MS, they don't have six figure employees who goes to work, has a coffee, then head out to the golf course until lunch. This is NOT to imply that all MS employees does this, but the top dogs do, as many other large corporate employees do. This is a waste of resources, but that would be opening another topic altogether.

Many Mozilla employees are actually volunteers, some of which worked for other giants such as MS, Adobe, IBM, AOL, you name it. They depend on the users for beta testing & feedback, and by not being fueled by greed, actually gets more done in a shorter time. Greed & money can hold things up, and by Mozilla not allowing that to happen, they actually have the best shot at the #1 position in the browser world.

Last, but certainly not least, is IE. Coming onto the scene around the same time as Windows 95 (as best as I can recall), IE has made great strides that no one thought possible. Just like around 1984 when Bill Gates was fighting like hell for the smallest chunk of market share for Windows, the same was repeated for IE. Windows 95 helped IE get on track, from version 1.0, and steadily climbed over the years. Much like today where Windows 7 is being cheered on, IE was cheered in a similar fashion. There was competition then too, with Netscape & AOL being major players. This is when the famous "browser wars" took place, in the late 90's. IE was growing fast, but along came Netscape, and like Firefox is today, it was IE's main competition. But times were different then, IE was popular, but not long formed. Bill Gates was determined to win this war, at all costs. At first, it appeared that Netscape had a legit chance, but there was one problem, they were running out of money to fight with. And slowly, Netscape was pounded into submission by the Microsoft team. IE was at that point the #1 browser, and hasn't looked back since. Over the years they have been dogged by it's critics, especially over it's ActiveX controls and other security flaws, but still today is the #1 browser in the world, as is their OS's. Today, IE8 is their main browser, especially on Windows 7 & Vista, on XP, IE7 does a better job. Some still uses IE6, but unless you like flirting with disaster, go at least with IE7 in XP (it works better than IE8 does), with Vista, you have the choice of IE7 or IE8, of which IE8 is the better choice.

So we're not long from the beta of IE9, as it seems. That must mean that IE6 is on it's last legs, as I cannot see supporting four generations of browsers at one time. Most likely there will be a forced upgrade to IE7 for XP users. In Win 2K, it ships with IE5.5, but in order to get updates, you have to upgrade to IE6 SP1. IE6 holdovers will receive the same treatment in XP. Mainly, we're waiting for support for Win 2K to end (next month), then IE6 will become disposable. Funny thing, one version of Vista has already ended, yet Win 2K still is here. Oh well, it doesn't matter, they're both outta here soon.

Looking forward to see just what IE9 really has to offer, and hope that Adobe is not a part of it, period. Nor ActiveX. We'll see.

Cat
 
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cat,
yes I did see some movie clips & I agree with you very much it was like HDMI Quality.I did try and obtain some insider knowledge about IE9 Preview release date & I was told about april 2011. I do agree with you from IE 6 most microsoft user's as well myself were un happy with security issues & kernel errors etc,but as for this IE 9 it's got me Very Interested again,although I also use FireFox & minefield when I use IE 8 its only the 32bit browser because as you know the 64 bit browser is left vulnerable no AV will help this.

After a return to some sort of form with IE8, can Microsoft (news, site) transform its browser for the lean and lite generation?I believe it will & can which gives me something to plan with & learn as much now cat regarding clouds,azure,Visual studio,.Net,all applications Microsoft are using now work on ipads,both windows & apple with their opera,safari work well as you said but on my macbook I still use IE because for some reason my white un used mac book is slowly dying of power.
The Next, Next Generation

After speeding up the Vista core for Windows 7, Microsoft now turns to the Internet Explorer browser as its next product in need of a boost.
While Internet Explorer 8 was an improvement on its predecessors, it was still slow and weighty compared to the new generation of nimble, rocket ship browsers like Chrome and recent versions of Fire fox.
In a recent presentation, Microsoft's new hero — the guy who seems to walk the walk while talking the talk — Steve Sinofsky, introduced an early (as in, been in development for less than a month) version of IE9 at the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference.

The Need For Speed
He mentioned that implementation of HTML5 and improved JavaScript performance will be the twin spurs behind development. Although with HTML5 still in draft, speed may be what we see more of in this iteration.

A further boost in performance will offered by employing the PC's graphics processing unit (GPU), as discussed in this Silverlight video (the interesting stuff happens about four minutes in).

The acceleration involves DirectX calls which coders will be able to access through CSS, DHMTL and Javascript. So fonts are smoother, maps display faster and effects can be smoothly implemented.
Will 3D acceleration make the browser faster, or just create more widely incompatible sites?
There is an interesting discussion on the IE Blog where the development team looks at the different demands placed on the browser and try to figure out where future improvements can be made. There are also some examples of the improvement in visual fidelity that IE9 will offer.
Working with Standards

Of course, the big debate around any browser is its ability to handle Web standards and Microsoft promises to make improvements in this regard. The current version of IE9 scores a 32 on the Acid3 test but is also looking at other measures of compatibility for CSS 3 and HTML 5.

IE9 has a long way to go in the compatibility stakes

Things will only get better as the product evolves towards a release version, but you can bet on Microsoft to do at least one or two things that will annoy some part of the design or user base. There is no set launch date or feature list for Internet Explorer 9.
cat,as you might want to watch the above video here is the source link.Awesome post cat I enjoy your replies as there is many years of Microsoft experience my friend & it shows in all your posts well done cat you are very IT experienced by years of trying Just about all Microsoft & others have released which as you said,we learn a lot from all of these new softwares,applications,browsers & especially Operating systems.

have a good weekend cat
regards
Jeffrey
 

catilley1092

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Well, in that link you posted above was an article, I read it, there was a place to offer your opinion. It said: Be the first of give your opinion. It's obvious this article is so biased that my opinion was not even shown after I was finished, it went back to the same screen, be the first to comment. If your opinion isn't wanted, why waste the space? Probably in the next week or so, I'll get hit with a virus, you had to give an email. I'll keep an eye out.

But regarding IE9, it does show serious potential. So far, it's fast, videos look good (they must have dumped Adobe, as they should have long ago), and it stands a chance to become a legitimate contender, one that the competition doesn't want to see. Especially Chrome & Opera. Safari's already lost any shot at contending, I've seen what their HTML5 is all about a few nights ago. Use their browser one time to evaluate it, and end up having to nuke my notebook over it. Their standards are high, alright. I believe it was less than a month ago that there were problems with Safari, it was posted on this forum. I gave them the benefit of the doubt, they will never contend.

IE and Firefox are the major players left now. Firefox has the momentum, it's a matter of it they can sustain. Clearly, the ball is in their hands, it's what they do with it that will determine it's future. But IE is not going to roll over for anyone, they always have a cat in the bag. If Firefox were to close in on IE, I would not be surprised to see MS waving cash at Mozilla. If it happens, you heard it from me first.

Really, these things happen all the time in the corporate community, buyouts. It's the easy way to declare victory over an opponent, and have the opponents employees, their secrets, everything. And it would virtually guarantee IE's reign for another 15 years. Put nothing past a corporation with tons of money, the one that I worked for was swallowed in the same fashion. Only they called it a "merger".

One thing for sure, the next two to five years will certainly be interesting to see unfold. Windows 7 will be #1 within a year or so, that much is certain. The rest, we'll wait and see.

Cat
 
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Be the First to Comment Cat I emailed the webmaster he moderates everything regarding these & he has assured me you will NOT be targeted & they don't keep email records for comments,if your not a member the comment is usually not posted so your safe m8.

Now on IE9,cat I really think that video showed speeds without anything but a Direct X graphics showing 2D pixels at speeds so fast I couldn't even see the changes usually you see broken edges,blurred areas but here we have real-time speeds.I agree that I can say adobe are out of the race.

Microsoft are putting real heavy weights in the IE team even that woman from the IE 8 come back as she has commented this IE 9 will be fastest & most secure of them all even with the implementation of cloud applications,Acid,HTML5 you mentioned that with Chrome & Opera. Safari's already lost any shot at contending, I've seen what their HTML5 is all about a few nights ago was it really that crook cat.I take your word for it as today I fired up my white mac book & when I tried to connect it was all locked up with updates for everything so I have left it on running & updating then I will give the mac a workout.

Until then cat I will keep an eye on that html5,I am also going to use IE9 all week and give it a real security test & I will let you have my stats next Sunday until then have a great week.

regards
Jeffrey
 

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