dos prompt setting


T

TelusPlanet

I like the quick edit and remove duplicate options. SO far I ahve not been
able to make the setting to stay beyond the instance of DOs prompt


with Xp I could specify save setting for Dos prompt with the same title.


you help is much appreciated
 
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J

johnbee

TelusPlanet said:
I like the quick edit and remove duplicate options. SO far I ahve not
been able to make the setting to stay beyond the instance of DOs prompt


with Xp I could specify save setting for Dos prompt with the same title.


you help is much appreciated
If you type CMD in the text box which shows when you click the Start button,
a window opens and shows a command prompt.

Now, right click on the title bar of the window (I think its blue) and a
list of things will appear. The one you want is Default. Select that and
you get up a nice option selection where you can set things to how you like
them including the duplicates thing.

I hope this is what you want, if not please post again. Someone will know
how to do it, you can actually do almost anything you want in Windows 7,
more than in earlier versions I think, but the methods are far from obvious
and Microsoft do not provide manuals (because surveys show that beginners
don't read manuals - which is why they are beginners of course).
 
T

telusPlanet

thx. wonderful.
johnbee said:
If you type CMD in the text box which shows when you click the Start
button, a window opens and shows a command prompt.

Now, right click on the title bar of the window (I think its blue) and a
list of things will appear. The one you want is Default. Select that and
you get up a nice option selection where you can set things to how you
like them including the duplicates thing.

I hope this is what you want, if not please post again. Someone will know
how to do it, you can actually do almost anything you want in Windows 7,
more than in earlier versions I think, but the methods are far from
obvious and Microsoft do not provide manuals (because surveys show that
beginners don't read manuals - which is why they are beginners of course).
 
D

Donald L McDaniel

I like the quick edit and remove duplicate options. SO far I ahve not been
able to make the setting to stay beyond the instance of DOs prompt


with Xp I could specify save setting for Dos prompt with the same title.


you help is much appreciated
1) Since Windows 7 does not contain Microsoft's old Real Mode, there
is no such thing as "DOS mode", there is no such thing as a "DOS
prompt", and "DOS" no longer exists in Windows, and hasn't since
Windows ME.
2) It's quite easy to change the Console prompt in Windows by using
the "Prompt" command in the Console. Just open a Console window and
enter "prompt" on the command line to find out how to do it.

Donald L McDaniel
 
J

johnbee

Donald L McDaniel said:
1) Since Windows 7 does not contain Microsoft's old Real Mode, there
is no such thing as "DOS mode", there is no such thing as a "DOS
prompt", and "DOS" no longer exists in Windows, and hasn't since
Windows ME.
2) It's quite easy to change the Console prompt in Windows by using
the "Prompt" command in the Console. Just open a Console window and
enter "prompt" on the command line to find out how to do it.

Donald L McDaniel
Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it. As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it. As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
 
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C

Char Jackson

Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it. As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
I guess I read it wrong, too, then. To me, the OP's question had
nothing to do with customizing the prompt. It looked to me like he
wanted to customize some of other settings related to a Command Prompt
window, but not the prompt itself.
 
J

johnbee

Gene E. Bloch said:
Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it.
As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
I know what he was talking about and it was nothing to do with what the man
asked.

I will add a comment: I don't think that the properties of the command
window which can be set to be in effect automatically or just for the moment
include the prompt, but I don't know why. Except of course that regular
command prompt users are not the types who would care much.

Properties for the command window are set by right clicking it's title bar
and then choosing either default or properties respectively, which is what
I told the chap. Not the most intuitively obvious thing about Windows and
also difficult to guess or stumble across. I always have, and have had, $P
which is the default provided anyway, I reckon since the year dot.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Gene E. Bloch said:
On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 05:54:33 GMT, "TelusPlanet"

I like the quick edit and remove duplicate options. SO far I ahve not
been
able to make the setting to stay beyond the instance of DOs prompt


with Xp I could specify save setting for Dos prompt with the same title.


you help is much appreciated

1) Since Windows 7 does not contain Microsoft's old Real Mode, there
is no such thing as "DOS mode", there is no such thing as a "DOS
prompt", and "DOS" no longer exists in Windows, and hasn't since
Windows ME.
2) It's quite easy to change the Console prompt in Windows by using
the "Prompt" command in the Console. Just open a Console window and
enter "prompt" on the command line to find out how to do it.

Donald L McDaniel

Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it.
As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
I know what he was talking about and it was nothing to do with what the man
asked.

I will add a comment: I don't think that the properties of the command
window which can be set to be in effect automatically or just for the moment
include the prompt, but I don't know why. Except of course that regular
command prompt users are not the types who would care much.

Properties for the command window are set by right clicking it's title bar
and then choosing either default or properties respectively, which is what
I told the chap. Not the most intuitively obvious thing about Windows and
also difficult to guess or stumble across. I always have, and have had, $P
which is the default provided anyway, I reckon since the year dot.
My command window has the prompt I mentioned above, and it has a macro
or two that I defined. These are automatic and permanent.

Since you don't believe me, I'll spend a moment now to track down how I
did it. You probably still won't believe me, but it might be of use to
others.

I placed a batch file which I called cmd_start.bat in a convenient
directory. I placed such things as a prompt command and a call to doskey
in that batch file.

I edited the registry to put the path to that file in
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Command Processor\Autorun
(as an SZ variable).

Voilà. Every time I start a command window, the prompt and the doskey
macros are created for that instance.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 05:54:33 GMT, "TelusPlanet"

I like the quick edit and remove duplicate options. SO far I ahve not
been
able to make the setting to stay beyond the instance of DOs prompt


with Xp I could specify save setting for Dos prompt with the same title.


you help is much appreciated

1) Since Windows 7 does not contain Microsoft's old Real Mode, there
is no such thing as "DOS mode", there is no such thing as a "DOS
prompt", and "DOS" no longer exists in Windows, and hasn't since
Windows ME.
2) It's quite easy to change the Console prompt in Windows by using
the "Prompt" command in the Console. Just open a Console window and
enter "prompt" on the command line to find out how to do it.

Donald L McDaniel

Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it. As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
I guess I read it wrong, too, then. To me, the OP's question had
nothing to do with customizing the prompt. It looked to me like he
wanted to customize some of other settings related to a Command Prompt
window, but not the prompt itself.
I have no idea whether I read it right, to tell the truth. I'd just
claim it as my take on the issue, and hope no one minds :)
 
R

R. C. White

?Hi, John.

I noticed, several Windows versions ago, that there are multiple Properties
screens for the Command Prompt window (as there are for other apps and
utilities).

If I right-click on the Command Prompt icon I've pinned to my Taskbar, then
right-click again and choose Properties, I get a screen with 11 tabs. If I
right-click on the Title Bar of an open Command Prompt window and choose
Properties, I get a screen with just 4 tabs. From cmd.exe in a Search
window, I get a screen with 5 tabs. There may be other variations, but I'm
too lazy to check out all of them now.

My favorite is Prompt $p$g, which I think is the default, ever since the
real MS-DOS (and TRSDOS before it).

Maybe the OP will come back and explain what he wants so that we don't have
to just talk among ourselves.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail Version 2011 (Build 15.4.3002.0810)) in Win7 Ultimate x64
SP1 beta


"johnbee" wrote in message

Gene E. Bloch said:
Actually I think you will find that the correct terminology is 'Command
Prompt' in 'Command mode'. Also, I think you will find that your comment
has nothing to do with his actual question - merely the phrasing of it.
As
I have mentioned before on this newsgroup, it is best to be a little
cautious in assuming superiority over a guy who uses command mode.
He was talking about changing the prompt in the command window, and the
command is indeed "prompt", e.g., in my case, PROMPT=[$n:]$s

The problem is that to make it work every time you start a window you
need to put it somewhere special, like in a batch file that you set up
to start with the command window.

Unfortunately, I have forgotten the drill and can't find it at the
moment, and I'm going out to lunch soon (no jokes, please...OK, joke if
you want).
I know what he was talking about and it was nothing to do with what the man
asked.

I will add a comment: I don't think that the properties of the command
window which can be set to be in effect automatically or just for the moment
include the prompt, but I don't know why. Except of course that regular
command prompt users are not the types who would care much.

Properties for the command window are set by right clicking it's title bar
and then choosing either default or properties respectively, which is what
I told the chap. Not the most intuitively obvious thing about Windows and
also difficult to guess or stumble across. I always have, and have had, $P
which is the default provided anyway, I reckon since the year dot.
 
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C

Char Jackson

Maybe the OP will come back and explain what he wants so that we don't have
to just talk among ourselves.
I was in the tiny minority who thought that the OP was specifically
asking about the "quick edit" and "remove duplicates" options, as
quoted below.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I was in the tiny minority who thought that the OP was specifically
asking about the "quick edit" and "remove duplicates" options, as
quoted below.
I must say that the original post is subject to various interpretations.

On rereading it, I can reinterpret it to mean that by the DOS prompt, he
meant the Command Window or Command Prompt :)

My suggestion about the startup batch file might be just what he needs,
but he seems to be a drive-by.

OTOH, what should we discuss among ourselves? (As "suggested" by R. C.
White.)
 
C

Char Jackson

I must say that the original post is subject to various interpretations.
That's certainly what happened, but I have to admit that I don't see
how. The initial request seems relatively clear to me and doesn't
appear to have anything to do with customizing the prompt itself, but
I guess others parsed the words differently.
On rereading it, I can reinterpret it to mean that by the DOS prompt, he
meant the Command Window or Command Prompt :)

My suggestion about the startup batch file might be just what he needs,
but he seems to be a drive-by.

OTOH, what should we discuss among ourselves? (As "suggested" by R. C.
White.)
:)
 
L

Leon Manfredi

1) Since Windows 7 does not contain Microsoft's old Real Mode, there
is no such thing as "DOS mode", there is no such thing as a "DOS
prompt", and "DOS" no longer exists in Windows, and hasn't since
Windows ME.
2) It's quite easy to change the Console prompt in Windows by using
the "Prompt" command in the Console. Just open a Console window and
enter "prompt" on the command line to find out how to do it.

Donald L McDaniel
That's weird..... Why? Because if I click on my Start Button ---->All
Programs ---> Accessories,,,,, lo and behold, a "Dos Command" icon!
 
J

johnbee

<


Maybe the OP will come back and explain what he wants so that we don't have
to just talk among ourselves. >

You might be being too hard on the OP. What he wanted to know was how to
set the editing options automatically for every use of what he called the
dos prompt. I interpreted that as meaning that he likes to use the command
prompt and save himself the bother of retyping commands by using the up and
down arrows and editing previous commands. In doing that, he wanted, for
example, to set automatically to being in insert mode rather than
overtyping so he can back arrow along a previous line and insert new
options, and also to automatically dump duplicate commends to save himself
needing to do too many up arrows and down arrows so his finger gets less
tired.

So I answered by telling him exactly how to do that (right click the title
bar and select default and the options one likes etc.) and he replied thanks
very much and buzzed off.

Somebody read it a bit fast and bit on the word 'prompt' and somebody else
decided to tell him off about his outdated terminology, neither of which was
the least bit worth him bothering about I suspect but were taken up by
others remembering the glorious Dos days of old. I can't remember whether
those command options were available in days of Dos because such tricks were
never my thing - I'd rather do things the long way in those days. I know
about right clicking the title bar and whipping through old commands because
I do a little of it.
 
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R

Roy Smith

That's weird..... Why? Because if I click on my Start Button ---->All
Programs ---> Accessories,,,,, lo and behold, a "Dos Command" icon!
So do you spell DOS Command - Command Prompt?


--

Roy Smith
Windows 7 Professional
Thunderbird 3.1.4
Sunday, September 26, 2010 9:37:04 PM
 
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