SOLVED Disable unlock Win7 screen


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Disable unlock Win7 screen

Every time I'm using the computer for a while, then leave, and come back in about ten or fifteen minutes later, The screen is BLACK, then I have to jiggle the mouse, touch the keyboard, stand on my head, then the UNLOCK/USERNAME box appears.

Is there any way to disable this...is this part of the screen saver? Power Management?

Screen Saver is 'NONE', so I wonder why I have to go through this process everytime. I'm the only one on here at all times. Just a nuisance.

Thanks!
 
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TrainableMan

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Screen Saver None means there is no video animation but but it may still power off to save energy (go black).
Be sure to uncheck the box that says "On resume, display logon screen" so then it shouldn't ask you to log back in.
screensaver.jpg
 
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The "On resume, display logon screen" is already unchecked. The Power Management is on BALANCED (recommended) , and not POWER SAVER, so I don't know why it keeps showing up after being idle for a while.
 

TrainableMan

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Balanced still allows sleep and I suspect that is what is happening. Please check out this How-to-geek and set it to "Do not a require a password"
 
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Ok, thanks to all. I hope your weekend is going very well.

This is what I did...

Right-click DESKTOP > PERSONALIZED > SCREEN SAVER
Went to > Screensaver
Went to > Balanced >
Change Plan settings >
TURN OFF DISPLAY - NEVER
PUT COMPUTER TO SLEEP - NEVER

Is this what you meant? Thanks a bunch!
 
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TrainableMan

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Well I think it is a good thing to let them sleep just to save electricity (go green, save the planet, etc) so I was suggesting you just set it to Not Require a Password when it wakes but, yeah if that is what you want then that should take care of it.
 
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Digerati

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Of course passwords are there for a reason - even if you are the only one using your computer. Passwords are a part of opsec (operational security) as well as physical security. If your computer is stolen, or someone breaks into your home, a computer that is not protected by a password is a badguy's delight. Of course passwords can be hacked fairly easily by someone who knows what they are doing, but most thieves are just opportunists, looking for an easy way to get some quick cash.

My advice is to ALWAYS use a STRONG password, at least 8 characters, upper and lower case, alpha and numeric characters, and even a special character. If your computer goes to sleep too quickly, change the sleep settings to longer times, but don't disable your password.
 

Shintaro

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Better security would be not to use the Administrators account whilst browsing the internet. Create normal user account for whom-ever is using the computer. That way there is less risk of being hacked online.

When I setup my friends/family's computers, that is the first thing I do.

When asked why, I say that the Administrators account is only for add/remove of programs and system maintenance. NOT for everyday use.
 

Digerati

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Well, your comment really has nothing to do with passwords or the computer going into sleep mode, but your logic is perfectly sound and I cannot disagree with that. However, if you are the only user of the system, if you keep your computer updated, patched, scanned and blocked, and you avoid risky practices such as illegal filesharing, using an admin account for everyday use is not a problem.

If the computer will be used by "guests", or kids, definitely have a "Standard" or limited account for them - especially if not using a password on that account.
 
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Digerati

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No. I don't do PMs for technical discussions - that's not what forums are for. And your comment in that PM implying I said a screen saver password makes a computer secure is a perfect example of why. I NEVER SAID OR IMPLIED ANYTHING OF THE SORT! :mad:

In fact, as anyone can see above (not possible with PMs) I specifically said in my first post here,
Digerati said:
Of course passwords can be hacked fairly easily
You use a screen saver password for the same reason you lock your doors at night. Both are about as effective at keeping a "determined" badguy out. But you still lock you doors.
 

Shintaro

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Oh, grow up! I thought that we could talk about this without it ending up in sometype of aggressive reponse. It appears you cannot do that.

A screensaver password is like closing the fly wire door and expecting it to be secure.
 

Digerati

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And part of growing up is not implying someone said something when they didn't - in public or private.

A screensaver password is like closing the fly wire door and expecting it to be secure.
Yeah, right. Like everyone has the skillset, tools, and knowledge to crack Windows 7. :rolleyes:

***

Sorry for the distractions Bozobytes. I hope you were able to resolve your problem with either no password or by changing the time intervals for going to sleep so that it is not such an irritant. Unless you have absolute physical control over this computer at all times or you are in a secured building, I recommend using a password.

Without a password, anybody - coworker, nosy neighbor, friend, relative, your kid's friends (those are the scary ones!) can walk up to that computer and see within seconds what you were doing and where you have been. And depending on your cookie setting, access any website - like this one. Or perhaps your Facebook page, or your bank. Maybe read your email - or send email in your name. It is just not worth it.

No single layer of security is infallible. Firewalls can be bypassed. Networks can be hacked. Anti-malware programs can miss malicious code or have false positives, and yes, passwords can be cracked too. Because a tool is not 100% effective against compromise does not mean it should be disabled. Computer security requires overlapping layers of protection with user discipline, with the user being most important (because the user is always the weakest link). And using a secure password for your Windows user ID is a key part of user discipline.
 

Shintaro

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And part of growing up is not implying someone said something when they didn't - in public or private.
???
:rolleyes: + shaking head...
Next....

Yeah, right. Like everyone has the skillset, tools, and knowledge to crack Windows 7. :rolleyes:
It doesn't need to be everyone, just some kid that has access to automated tools. Sheesh!
:rolleyes:

Anyway moving on........

Sorry for the distractions Bozobytes.
Agreed apologies for the digression.

I hope you were able to resolve your problem with either no password or by changing the time intervals for going to sleep so that it is not such an irritant. Unless you have absolute physical control over this computer at all times or you are in a secured building, I recommend using a password.

Without a password, anybody - coworker, nosy neighbor, friend, relative, your kid's friends (those are the scary ones!) can walk up to that computer and see within seconds what you were doing and where you have been. And depending on your cookie setting, access any website - like this one. Or perhaps your Facebook page, or your bank. Maybe read your email - or send email in your name. It is just not worth it.

No single layer of security is infallible. Firewalls can be bypassed. Networks can be hacked. Anti-malware programs can miss malicious code or have false positives, and yes, passwords can be cracked too. Because a tool is not 100% effective against compromise does not mean it should be disabled. Computer security requires overlapping layers of protection with user discipline, with the user being most important (because the user is always the weakest link). And using a secure password for your Windows user ID is a key part of user discipline.
Agreed.

What was Microsoft's famous standard or something, that their computer was secure if it didn't have access to a network and *I think* no user access. Been some time since I looked at that old standard. Was it way back in Win NT ?
Anyway the point, as Digerati said, nothing is 100% secure.

The problem being how to keep the best possible user experience without compromising security.
One of the original reasons, I think (As I cannot remember the survey) why UAC was toned down.

Again, Bozobytes sorry for the digression.
 
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TrainableMan

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Security can be quite a touchy subject as you can see.

We answer the questions as best we can and we may offer suggestions and reasons why it's a good idea to do things one way or another but in the end it's up to the user; people will do what they are going to do.

For the most part, where I live, we still keep our doors unlocked when we are home during the day; many places I wouldn't recommend that. My computer is a desktop and unless somebody walks in to my house it won't matter if I have a password or not so I do not require one on restore. I'll take the responsibility to log off if I want it locked.

Bozobytes, I believe you got your answer, if there is still an issue please start a new thread as I'm going to close this one.
 
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