Can't access remote disk


S

Scott Meyers

Do you plan to test the Homegroups feature?
No. It doesn't sound any easier than what I'm doing now, and I have no
other use for Homegroups. I've actually disabled the services so that
Homegroups doesn't appear in Explorer.

Scott
 
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C

Char Jackson

No. It doesn't sound any easier than what I'm doing now, and I have no
other use for Homegroups. I've actually disabled the services so that
Homegroups doesn't appear in Explorer.
If I get a chance to try it I'll post a follow-up to this thread.
 
L

Leon Manfredi

Sorry, my mistake, I shared with "Everyone", not "Everybody".

Scott
GUESS WHAT I JUST DID???? Took your suggestion, created an "Anyone" directory,
and when I opened it, was told that there were no folders in it, which upon on
dialog, typed "C:" sans quotes, and the whole goddamned files and programs,
loaded themselves in automatically.. (Sorry but I typed in "Anyone")...
 
C

Char Jackson

GUESS WHAT I JUST DID???? Took your suggestion, created an "Anyone" directory,
and when I opened it, was told that there were no folders in it, which upon on
dialog, typed "C:" sans quotes, and the whole goddamned files and programs,
loaded themselves in automatically.. (Sorry but I typed in "Anyone")...
You mean you created a new Library, right?

If so, have you tried using the Homegroups feature to share that
Library on your LAN, and have you then tried to access that shared
Library from another PC on your LAN? I'd be curious to know if you
gain full access to the User folders, specifically.

I plan to test it myself when I get a Round Tuit.
 
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C

Char Jackson

If so, have you tried using the Homegroups feature to share that
Library on your LAN, and have you then tried to access that shared
Library from another PC on your LAN? I'd be curious to know if you
gain full access to the User folders, specifically.

I plan to test it myself when I get a Round Tuit.
OK, I played with this tonight.

1. I enabled the Homegroups feature on 4 Windows 7 systems.
2. I created a new Library and called it Everything.
3. My new Library contained a single 'folder' - the root of C:.
4. I attempted to share my new Library, but got an error. (Can't share
system files.)
5. I removed C: from the Library and added C:\Users. Same error as
above. Non-system folders could be added to the new Library just fine
and were immediately shared to the other Homegroup-enabled systems.

So while Homegroups makes it super easy, even drop dead easy, to share
one or more Libraries between two or more Win 7 systems, it doesn't
let you share system folders. But did I mention how easy it was to
share non-system folders?

The other thing I learned was that enabling Homegroups isn't
disruptive in any way to normal networking and shared folders. There
was a question about that in this newsgroup awhile back.
 
L

Leon Manfredi

You mean you created a new Library, right?

If so, have you tried using the Homegroups feature to share that
Library on your LAN, and have you then tried to access that shared
Library from another PC on your LAN? I'd be curious to know if you
gain full access to the User folders, specifically.

I plan to test it myself when I get a Round Tuit.
That it did, and it seems that most of drives C's files, transferred themselves,
.....literally, to folder Anyone, in Library. Wound up removing the share feature
of Anyone, and did a remove to a dialog and seems all, went back to drive C:\.
Will keep all, up to date on this....
 
S

Scott Meyers

That it did, and it seems that most of drives C's files, transferred themselves,
....literally, to folder Anyone, in Library.
When you say "most," can you please elaborate on what was not shared
when you shared the entire drive?

Thanks,

Scott
 
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C

Char Jackson

That it did, and it seems that most of drives C's files, transferred themselves,
....literally, to folder Anyone, in Library. Wound up removing the share feature
of Anyone, and did a remove to a dialog and seems all, went back to drive C:\.
Will keep all, up to date on this....
Just to clarify (again), when you create a Library nothing gets
"moved" into it. Likewise, when you delete a Library, nothing gets
"moved" back to where it was (because it was never moved in the first
place).
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

On Wed, 14 Mar 2012 20:56:12 -0400, Leon Manfredi
Just to clarify (again), when you create a Library nothing gets
"moved" into it. Likewise, when you delete a Library, nothing gets
"moved" back to where it was (because it was never moved in the first
place).
But is it time to start another endless thread about *deleting* files
from a library list? :)

NO, let's not...

But yesterday I found that I had made a mistake in my criticisms of
libraries. At least I think I did - because I'm confused, not because
I'm vain.

First: I am not using Libraries, and I have noting in the Libraries (I
haven't disabled them other wise).

Yesterday I went to delete a file that was highlighted, by using the
context menu after right-clicking it. The verification message was not
"Do you want to delete X?" (the file), but "Do you want to delete Y?"
(the containing folder - which happened to be Apps\Roaming. Oops. BIG
OOPS! Luckily I was alert...

So now I realize that the phenomenon probably isn't related to
Libraries. But I *do not* understand it (yet).

Please don't respond to this, other than just to insult me, of course.
We don't want to start a new infinite subthread, now do we? :)
 
C

Char Jackson

But is it time to start another endless thread about *deleting* files
from a library list? :)

NO, let's not...
Spoil sport. :)
But yesterday I found that I had made a mistake in my criticisms of
libraries. At least I think I did - because I'm confused, not because
I'm vain.

First: I am not using Libraries, and I have noting in the Libraries (I
haven't disabled them other wise).

Yesterday I went to delete a file that was highlighted, by using the
context menu after right-clicking it. The verification message was not
"Do you want to delete X?" (the file), but "Do you want to delete Y?"
(the containing folder - which happened to be Apps\Roaming. Oops. BIG
OOPS! Luckily I was alert...

So now I realize that the phenomenon probably isn't related to
Libraries. But I *do not* understand it (yet).
That is really weird behavior and could be dangerous to the health of
the system. The Windows system, I mean, although the human system may
also take a stress hit.
Please don't respond to this, other than just to insult me, of course.
We don't want to start a new infinite subthread, now do we? :)
Ok, I won't respond to it. :)
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

On Thu, 15 Mar 2012 11:57:56 -0700, Gene E. Bloch
[snip]
Yesterday I went to delete a file that was highlighted, by using the
context menu after right-clicking it. The verification message was not
"Do you want to delete X?" (the file), but "Do you want to delete Y?"
(the containing folder - which happened to be Apps\Roaming. Oops. BIG
OOPS! Luckily I was alert...

So now I realize that the phenomenon probably isn't related to
Libraries. But I *do not* understand it (yet).
That is really weird behavior and could be dangerous to the health of
the system. The Windows system, I mean, although the human system may
also take a stress hit.
Can you trust your system after getting something like that? It
*would* be quite a stress hit. I would probably be looking rather
cautiously at my system for some time.
Ok, I won't respond to it. :)
So you think he is not worth the trouble to insult? That was
nasty. <BEG>

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

[snip]
Yesterday I went to delete a file that was highlighted, by using the
context menu after right-clicking it. The verification message was not
"Do you want to delete X?" (the file), but "Do you want to delete Y?"
(the containing folder - which happened to be Apps\Roaming. Oops. BIG
OOPS! Luckily I was alert...

So now I realize that the phenomenon probably isn't related to
Libraries. But I *do not* understand it (yet).
That is really weird behavior and could be dangerous to the health of
the system. The Windows system, I mean, although the human system may
also take a stress hit.
Can you trust your system after getting something like that? It
*would* be quite a stress hit. I would probably be looking rather
cautiously at my system for some time.
So you think he is not worth the trouble to insult? That was
nasty. <BEG>

Gene Wirchenko
Sorry, but I won't respond to you, since your response is to a
non-existent person, according to [nobody, I guess].

This is very confusing :)
 

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