Can thumb drives be left sitting in the USB socket?


P

Peter Jason

I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter
 
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B

BillW50

Peter said:
I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1
Should be just fine Peter. People do that all of the time. What kills
them is lots of unnecessary writing. As each sector can take only 5,000
to 10,000 rewrites for MLC type and 100,000 for SLC type.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Peter.
Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?
Yes. But USB 3.0 slots are backward compatible with USB 2.0 (and USB 1, I
assume), so we can continue to use all our USB 2 thumb drives, keyboards,
mice, etc., with no problems - at USB 2 speeds, of course. I've not
actually seen much USB 3.0 hardware available yet, but my new motherboard
has a couple of USB 3.0 slots, so I'm ready when the time comes. ;<) And I
often leave USB devices plugged in 24/7.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3508.1109) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Peter Jason" wrote in message

I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter
 
J

Justin

Peter Jason said:
I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter
Bill and RC hit both nails right on the head.

The *only* time keeping a USB drive in the socket can be an annoyance is
if the machine is set to boot from the USB drive in the BIOS. But that
is an easy fix and most machines are not set up that way by default.
 
P

Paul

Peter said:
I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter
With no technical basis for the comments, I

1) Leave my USB to RS232 adapters plugged in permanently. They're
even powered while the computer sleeps, with the LEDs lit up.
This doesn't bother me a bit.

2) USB flash, I always unplug them. Even though it eventually leads
to the connector getting a bit loose, or risking cracking the
solder joints where the connector meets the PCB. For me, it's
all a matter of how trustworthy the hardware design is. I guess
I just don't trust them :)

*******

You can get USB3 thumb drives. This looks cheap enough, to use
as a test case.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211521

Read Speed up to 68MB/s
Write Speed up to 18MB/s

Since it is "early days" for such things, you'll find some
variation from product to product. For $200, you can find one
with a better balance between read and write. But really, does
anyone buy $200 USB sticks ? How loud a curse word would you need
to shout, if it broke ? :) That's why I'd look for something
a little cheaper. So I wouldn't be quite as upset when it breaks.

For $200, you could likely find a nice SSD. And then, go looking
for a packaging solution for it. For example, you could jam an
SSD into this dock, and make a fast external flash solution.
So far, the best quoted result with the dock, is 130MB/sec.
You could try putting a 200MB/sec+ SSD in it, and "see what
it's got".

ineo I-NA317U-Plus USB3 Dock

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817620014

http://images.highspeedbackbone.net/SKUimages/enhanced/I15-1022-call05-jfwd.jpg

HTH,
Paul
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Paul.
Since it is "early days" for such things, you'll find some variation from
product to product. For $200, you can find one with a better balance
between read and write. But really, does anyone buy $200 USB sticks ? How
loud a curse word would you need to shout, if it broke ? :) That's why
I'd look for something a little cheaper. So I wouldn't be quite as upset
when it breaks.
Well, in the "early days" for flash drives, I bought one in January 2003 for
$108 at Office Depot. It was BIG! 128 MB! And that was USB 1, of course.
And it DID break - but I snapped the case back together and kept using it
for a few years. Except for the connector and case, the functional parts of
those drives are quite durable, almost indestructible. They basically are
just a solid chunk of hard plastic with RAM inside - I think.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3508.1109) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Paul" wrote in message
Peter said:
I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter

With no technical basis for the comments, I

1) Leave my USB to RS232 adapters plugged in permanently. They're
even powered while the computer sleeps, with the LEDs lit up.
This doesn't bother me a bit.

2) USB flash, I always unplug them. Even though it eventually leads
to the connector getting a bit loose, or risking cracking the
solder joints where the connector meets the PCB. For me, it's
all a matter of how trustworthy the hardware design is. I guess
I just don't trust them :)

*******

You can get USB3 thumb drives. This looks cheap enough, to use
as a test case.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211521

Read Speed up to 68MB/s
Write Speed up to 18MB/s

Since it is "early days" for such things, you'll find some
variation from product to product. For $200, you can find one
with a better balance between read and write. But really, does
anyone buy $200 USB sticks ? How loud a curse word would you need
to shout, if it broke ? :) That's why I'd look for something
a little cheaper. So I wouldn't be quite as upset when it breaks.

For $200, you could likely find a nice SSD. And then, go looking
for a packaging solution for it. For example, you could jam an
SSD into this dock, and make a fast external flash solution.
So far, the best quoted result with the dock, is 130MB/sec.
You could try putting a 200MB/sec+ SSD in it, and "see what
it's got".

ineo I-NA317U-Plus USB3 Dock

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817620014

http://images.highspeedbackbone.net/SKUimages/enhanced/I15-1022-call05-jfwd.jpg

HTH,
Paul
 
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T

tommyold

I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?

Also, are there special thumb drives for USB3 sockets?

I have Windows 7 SP1

Peter
A suggestion for those concerned with usb socket becoming loose.
I plug in all permanent usb devices, printers etc. in the back.
Any sockets left in the back I use an extension for each socket,back and
front. Build a cable holder out of the way with easy access.
take care.
 
P

Peter Jason

A suggestion for those concerned with usb socket becoming loose.
I plug in all permanent usb devices, printers etc. in the back.
Any sockets left in the back I use an extension for each socket,back and
front. Build a cable holder out of the way with easy access.
take care.

Thanks for all replies. I have my computer sitting at shoulder
height on a multi shelved cabinet in which on various shelves are
scanner, small printers etc. This cabinet will be fitted with wheels
in the near future to allow moving for better access.
Hooks screwed into the wood at each side hold spare cables for
cameras, external accessories etc. The shoulder height feature works
very well for adjusting the internals and reducing the susceptibility
to dust. Everything is off the desk except the screen and keyboard.

A cabinet with slide-out shelves would be better and I'm on the
lookout for one.
 
C

Char Jackson

Thanks for all replies. I have my computer sitting at shoulder
height on a multi shelved cabinet in which on various shelves are
scanner, small printers etc. This cabinet will be fitted with wheels
in the near future to allow moving for better access.
Hooks screwed into the wood at each side hold spare cables for
cameras, external accessories etc. The shoulder height feature works
very well for adjusting the internals and reducing the susceptibility
to dust. Everything is off the desk except the screen and keyboard.

A cabinet with slide-out shelves would be better and I'm on the
lookout for one.
If you like the cabinet you already have, it's usually easy to add
slides to the shelves.
 
P

Peter Jason

If you like the cabinet you already have, it's usually easy to add
slides to the shelves.
My idea is to buy an old steel filing cabinet in good condition and
then remove the drawer fronts to allow access. Those with the
openings on the side would be ideal.

I have done something similar for storing DVDs platters, for movies
and for programs, by getting a good quality old library card-filing
cabinet which is shoulder height and has 7 drawers. The whole thing
holds 2000 DVDs in plastic snap-open holders, and very many more in
sleeves. The cabinet was only $150. The unit must be in good
condition with good sliding mechanisms because all the DVDs are quite
heavy. The commercial units cost thousands!
 
A

Andrew Rossmann

I use them as mini drives, and I would prefer to just leave them in
their computer sockets. I notice they warm up a bit and their
indicator light stays on. Is this OK?
What do you use the USB drive for? If it's just sneakernet-style usage,
it's OK. If you use it for backing up data, you should remove it. Any
form of backup should ideally only be connected when needed. Otherwise,
it could always be corrupted by a virus, trojan, software bug, or human
error.
 
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L

LouB

Andrew said:
What do you use the USB drive for? If it's just sneakernet-style usage,
it's OK. If you use it for backing up data, you should remove it. Any
form of backup should ideally only be connected when needed. Otherwise,
it could always be corrupted by a virus, trojan, software bug, or human
error.
Good advice
 

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