XP emulation


G

Gene Wirchenko

The attic in a typical house just might be one of the least suited
places for a storage farm. ;-)
It is less likely to flood.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

I've run the Logitech Harmony remote software too, it works just fine in
Windows 7 without requiring any XP compatibility. I've run it on at
least 4 different computers and it's run fine in Vista and 7.

Yousuf Khan
Which is why it's a mystery here...
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

I'll trade the certainty of overheating for the risk of flooding,
every time.
Remember the floods in Thailand affecting all those hard-drive
factories?

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
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C

Char Jackson

[snip]
Remember the floods in Thailand affecting all those hard-drive
factories?
Yes. Why do you ask? Do you live in Thailand?
Think of a good use for an attic then.
You're not making any sense.

I've installed hundreds and hundreds of home theater systems, home
audio, home automation, and home networking systems. I've spent way
too much time in people's attics over the years and IME it's quite
rare to find one that isn't about 145 degrees in the summer, not to
mention being dirty as hell. Go ahead and put a server and some hard
drives up there, but be advised that none of it will last very long.
Does that help you to understand why an attic is about the worst
possible choice?

Since you're interested in floods, let's talk about that. When the
waters rise, they don't necessarily stop short of drowning the attic.
Ask the folks in New Orleans or the folks in your favorite place,
Thailand. The big difference is that attics are extremely hot and
dirty every year, while floods occur on a much less regular schedule.
The choice should be both obvious and easy.
 
J

John Williamson

I've installed hundreds and hundreds of home theater systems, home
audio, home automation, and home networking systems. I've spent way
too much time in people's attics over the years and IME it's quite
rare to find one that isn't about 145 degrees in the summer, not to
mention being dirty as hell. Go ahead and put a server and some hard
drives up there, but be advised that none of it will last very long.
Does that help you to understand why an attic is about the worst
possible choice?
My attic drops to about 55 degrees Fahrenheit in Winter and may get as
high as 98 Fahrenheit on the only sunny day in Summer, but then again, I
and the other 60 million or so people here in the United Kingdom live in
a country where we have civilised weather. ;-)

The only real problem with installing stuff in an attic here is getting
access and running the power and network cables through the two or three
storey house. My attic is also relatively clean, as I use it for general
storage, too. We *could* put stuff in the cupboard under the stairs, but
then it would get all sorts of junk dumped on top of it and there's
normally a total ack of ventilation, which doesn't help reliability at all.
 
C

Char Jackson

My attic drops to about 55 degrees Fahrenheit in Winter and may get as
high as 98 Fahrenheit on the only sunny day in Summer, but then again, I
and the other 60 million or so people here in the United Kingdom live in
a country where we have civilised weather. ;-)
Cool. Let me know when it stops raining.
 
G

Gene Wirchenko

[snip]
Think of a good use for an attic then.
You're not making any sense.
I think you are confusing sense and agreeing with you. The two
are orthogonal.
I've installed hundreds and hundreds of home theater systems, home
audio, home automation, and home networking systems. I've spent way
too much time in people's attics over the years and IME it's quite
rare to find one that isn't about 145 degrees in the summer, not to
mention being dirty as hell. Go ahead and put a server and some hard
drives up there, but be advised that none of it will last very long.
Does that help you to understand why an attic is about the worst
possible choice?
Not all attics are like that. Naturally, I was not suggesting
that you put equipment in a dirty, hot location.
Since you're interested in floods, let's talk about that. When the
waters rise, they don't necessarily stop short of drowning the attic.
True enough. Consider that if a flood reaches the attic, the
whole building is under (excepting possibly the roof) and building
computer use probably drops significantly.
Ask the folks in New Orleans or the folks in your favorite place,
Thailand. The big difference is that attics are extremely hot and
dirty every year, while floods occur on a much less regular schedule.
The choice should be both obvious and easy.
You mean to just consider the common failure modes and ignore the
others? I have read too many stories of floods in computer rooms to
want to ignore the possibility.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
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T

TheGunslinger

I just got a new computer with Win7 Pro. Some of the programs that worked
on my XP machine don't install. How do I get into XP emulation mode? Does
that have to be done when Win7 is installed, or is it not too late. I hear
it's not easy.
You don';t indicate which version of Win-7 you have: Home; Pro;
ultimate?

You don't even indicate whether you have 32-bit or 64-bit versions of
Win-7 or XP?

Windows 7 requires at least Professional to install XP-Mode.

However, IF you have 32-bit Win-7, you can install Virtual PC 2007
SP1, and install any operating system including MS DOS 6.22.

Hope this helps.

MJR
 
A

Art Todesco

Which ones? I've never had this problem
I have an older copy of Micrografx Designer and Picture Publisher, which
I can only run in Virtual XP. Corel has since bought the company and
merged these programs with their stuff, however, I do like the older
stuff. For the most part, it runs ok, but would be nicer if it were off
the straight W7 compatibility mode. The one problem that I have in the
Virtual XP realm is that when I launch the Virtual machine, it spawns a
printer job on the W7 bar. If you open the job, it appears to be one of
my printers, an HP deskjet. I can, easily delete it and all is well,
just a bother. I've discussed this here and I though some of the
suggestions had worked, but the empty jobs started coming back again. I
suppose I could try removing the HP printer in the Virtual XP and
re-install it, but I haven't tried that yet.
 
A

Alan Justice

Gene E. Bloch said:
His terminology might be confusing you.

1. You can run software under "compatibility mode" in Windows 7. This
means Windows 7 makes allowances for the old code. You set it per
program by opening up Properties and clicking on 'Run in compatibility
mode' after choosing which mode.

2. In higher versions of Windows 7 you can install XP mode, which is a
package of a virtual machine and an XP license. You are running the
program in XP *in the virtual machine*. This software is not provided by
default, but it's a free download from Microsoft. It's only available
for Win 7 Pro or higher.

The second one is what Yousuf Khan means by the full XP mode emulator.

The use of XP mode has been explained in this thread already, along with
another approach or two.
How do I get to the point of running in compatibility mode if it won't let
me install it in the first place? Msg about now working with 64 bit.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

How do I get to the point of running in compatibility mode if it won't let
me install it in the first place? Msg about now working with 64 bit.
Compatibility mode is already there. It's a standard feature of Windows
and has been for years - decades, maybe. It is XP mode that you can't
install. Please reread my paragraphs 1 and 2 above...

Right click on an executable file (whatever.exe), choose Properties,
click on the Compatibility tab, and make your settings in the
compatibility area, which is the first area on that panel...

Check the checkbox and choose the compatibility version you want. Try it
and see whether it works.
 
A

Alan Justice

Gene E. Bloch said:
Compatibility mode is already there. It's a standard feature of Windows
and has been for years - decades, maybe. It is XP mode that you can't
install. Please reread my paragraphs 1 and 2 above...

Right click on an executable file (whatever.exe), choose Properties,
click on the Compatibility tab, and make your settings in the
compatibility area, which is the first area on that panel...

Check the checkbox and choose the compatibility version you want. Try it
and see whether it works.
I put the install disk (Nikon scan, for a slide scanner) in the CD drive and
highlighted welcome.exe, which is what installs the programs. In the
Compatibility tab, the option for comp. mode was greyed out. (I had
initially put in the wrong disk, for the reference manual, and I was able to
install in XP mode.)
 
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P

Paul

Alan said:
I put the install disk (Nikon scan, for a slide scanner) in the CD drive and
highlighted welcome.exe, which is what installs the programs. In the
Compatibility tab, the option for comp. mode was greyed out. (I had
initially put in the wrong disk, for the reference manual, and I was able to
install in XP mode.)
Have you looked for a recipe ?

This is an example, from search terms "nikon scan installation in windows 7".

http://blog.controlspace.org/2010/05/nikon-scan-on-windows-7-and-vista-64.html

Paul
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

I put the install disk (Nikon scan, for a slide scanner) in the CD drive and
highlighted welcome.exe, which is what installs the programs. In the
Compatibility tab, the option for comp. mode was greyed out. (I had
initially put in the wrong disk, for the reference manual, and I was able to
install in XP mode.)
I meant the installed executable.
 

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