Work slower after updates?


A

Alonso

1. Yesterday I've installed a large set of windows7 updates (14 items). It
seems to me, windows loads a bit slower after all these updates. I that
possible?

2. How to configure windows 7 load only *necessary* services and
applications, to save resources? Is there some handy application alowing
configure only necessary windows services and processes? Since I dont know
what exactly processes and services is necessary for windows and what - not,
I need some utility that can configure that. I only need services necessary
for Skype and Antivirus program in normal mode I use windows.

thanks for help.
 
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K

Ken Blake

1. Yesterday I've installed a large set of windows7 updates (14 items). It
seems to me, windows loads a bit slower after all these updates. I that
possible?


Possible? Yes. But it's unlikely that it's significant.

My personal view is that the attention many people pay to how long it
takes to boot is unwarranted. Assuming that the computer's speed is
otherwise satisfactory, it is not generally worth worrying about. Most
people start their computers once a day or even less frequently. In
the overall scheme of things, even a few minutes to start up isn't
very important. Personally I power on my computer when I get up in the
morning, then go get my coffee. When I come back, it's done booting. I
don't know how long it took to boot and I don't care.


2. How to configure windows 7 load only *necessary* services and
applications, to save resources? Is there some handy application alowing
configure only necessary windows services and processes? Since I dont know
what exactly processes and services is necessary for windows and what - not,
I need some utility that can configure that. I only need services necessary
for Skype and Antivirus program in normal mode I use windows.

I strongly recommend that you do *not* do this. Yes, it's possible,
but what you can save is very small, and the likelihood of your
screwing something up is great.
 
A

Alonso

Ken Blake said:
Possible? Yes. But it's unlikely that it's significant.

My personal view is that the attention many people pay to how long it
takes to boot is unwarranted. Assuming that the computer's speed is
otherwise satisfactory, it is not generally worth worrying about. Most
people start their computers once a day or even less frequently. In
the overall scheme of things, even a few minutes to start up isn't
very important. Personally I power on my computer when I get up in the
morning, then go get my coffee. When I come back, it's done booting. I
don't know how long it took to boot and I don't care.





I strongly recommend that you do *not* do this. Yes, it's possible,
but what you can save is very small, and the likelihood of your
screwing something up is great.
------------

can no agree with fact that boot loading time isn't important. My Dell
vostro 1520 laptop booted fast before upgrades, and I never even focused on
that, usually I turn my laptop a few times per day..
There was a vaste quantity of updates for .NET Framework software, can this
software cause slow down? Dont know what is necessity of this software at
all.
 
B

Bruce Hagen

Alonso said:
------------

can no agree with fact that boot loading time isn't important. My Dell
vostro 1520 laptop booted fast before upgrades, and I never even focused
on that, usually I turn my laptop a few times per day..
There was a vaste quantity of updates for .NET Framework software, can
this software cause slow down? Dont know what is necessity of this
software at all.
See if a Defrag helps.
 
C

Char Jackson

2. How to configure windows 7 load only *necessary* services and
applications, to save resources? Is there some handy application alowing
configure only necessary windows services and processes? Since I dont know
what exactly processes and services is necessary for windows and what - not,
I need some utility that can configure that. I only need services necessary
for Skype and Antivirus program in normal mode I use windows.
Yes, there are handy utilities and other methods for configuring what
gets started automatically, but you admit that you don't know what's
important, so how do you plan to make any changes, even if you had
such a utility in front of you?

As the others have said, just leave well enough alone. If you're
starting your laptop multiple times per day, perhaps it would work
better for you to put it to sleep instead of shutting it down.
 
B

Boscoe

1. Yesterday I've installed a large set of windows7 updates (14 items).
It seems to me, windows loads a bit slower after all these updates. I
that possible?

2. How to configure windows 7 load only *necessary* services and
applications, to save resources? Is there some handy application alowing
configure only necessary windows services and processes? Since I dont
know what exactly processes and services is necessary for windows and
what - not, I need some utility that can configure that. I only need
services necessary for Skype and Antivirus program in normal mode I use
windows.

thanks for help.

If your PC is booting up in under 90 seconds I would leave well alone.
Services should only tinkered with by more experienced users.
If you go to Search on the Start menu and type 'services.msc' (without
the quotes),
a list of Services will appear. The columns show the name of each
Service along with a
brief description of what each one does and whether or not it starts
automatically with Windows,
and whether or not it is currently running.

You can Google them to see which services to stop but, disabling a
Service stops it running altogether and if for some reason it is needed
you will see an error message or something important may stop working.
 
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A

Alonso

Boscoe said:
If your PC is booting up in under 90 seconds I would leave well alone.
Services should only tinkered with by more experienced users.
If you go to Search on the Start menu and type 'services.msc' (without
the quotes),
a list of Services will appear. The columns show the name of each
Service along with a
brief description of what each one does and whether or not it starts
automatically with Windows,
and whether or not it is currently running.

You can Google them to see which services to stop but, disabling a
Service stops it running altogether and if for some reason it is needed
you will see an error message or something important may stop working.
----------------

laptop definitely boot slower after these updates, compare how it boots
before these senseless update pack, the full updates pack size was seems
just ~24MB, but it take long time enough to install and configure them.

14 updates list:
http://i.imgur.com/RUxxx.jpg

there was a much larger updates I installed in the past, but no one caused
boot slow down.
I have 252GB free of 283GB space, new laptop.

what is necessity of .net framework at all? What is necessity of windows
defender?
What exactly can slow down boot process on new laptop?
 
K

Ken Blake

laptop definitely boot slower after these updates, compare how it boots
before these senseless update pack, the full updates pack size was seems
just ~24MB, but it take long time enough to install and configure them.

14 updates list:
http://i.imgur.com/RUxxx.jpg

there was a much larger updates I installed in the past, but no one caused
boot slow down.
I have 252GB free of 283GB space, new laptop.

what is necessity of .net framework at all?

It's needed only if you want to run programs that were written with
..net, and therefore need the framework. If you don't run any such
programs, it's not necessary at all.

But as I said earlier, except the tiny amount of disk space used, the
is *no* disadvantage of having it installed. You can get of it today,
but you'll probably need it some time in the future, so if I were you
I would just leave it alone.


What is necessity of windows defender?

It's anti-spyware software. It protects you against some of the
malware out there.

What exactly can slow down boot process on new laptop?


Laptop or desktop, the two main things are malware infection, and what
programs you have starting automatically. Malware infection is the
most common reason these days.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Alonso.

Let me second the advice that the others have given you. If you don't know
what's important, then you won't be able to predict the effects of whatever
services you might turn off. When I look at the list of Services, I can't
guess which ones I'll need. As Char said, if you need to start your PC
multiple times a day, perhaps you should be using Sleep or Hibernate, rather
than Shut Down.

What kind of malware protection do you have installed? I've been using
Microsoft Security Essentials since it became available a year or two ago.
It is the only malware/virus protection that I use. Windows Defender is
installed automatically in Windows 7, but MSE disable Defender because MSE
includes Defender's functions. And it's free for the download. ;<)

If you haven't heard of MSE, check this out:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security_essentials/default.aspx

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"Alonso" wrote in message

Boscoe said:
If your PC is booting up in under 90 seconds I would leave well alone.
Services should only tinkered with by more experienced users.
If you go to Search on the Start menu and type 'services.msc' (without
the quotes),
a list of Services will appear. The columns show the name of each
Service along with a
brief description of what each one does and whether or not it starts
automatically with Windows,
and whether or not it is currently running.

You can Google them to see which services to stop but, disabling a
Service stops it running altogether and if for some reason it is needed
you will see an error message or something important may stop working.
----------------

laptop definitely boot slower after these updates, compare how it boots
before these senseless update pack, the full updates pack size was seems
just ~24MB, but it take long time enough to install and configure them.

14 updates list:
http://i.imgur.com/RUxxx.jpg

there was a much larger updates I installed in the past, but no one caused
boot slow down.
I have 252GB free of 283GB space, new laptop.

what is necessity of .net framework at all? What is necessity of windows
defender?
What exactly can slow down boot process on new laptop?
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Hi, Alonso.

Let me second the advice that the others have given you. If you don't know
what's important, then you won't be able to predict the effects of whatever
services you might turn off. When I look at the list of Services, I can't
guess which ones I'll need. As Char said, if you need to start your PC
multiple times a day, perhaps you should be using Sleep or Hibernate, rather
than Shut Down.

What kind of malware protection do you have installed? I've been using
Microsoft Security Essentials since it became available a year or two ago.
It is the only malware/virus protection that I use. Windows Defender is
installed automatically in Windows 7, but MSE disable Defender because MSE
includes Defender's functions. And it's free for the download. ;<)

If you haven't heard of MSE, check this out:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security_essentials/default.aspx

RC
I disagree with you and Ken, as well as Char and Boscoe.

I think we should give Alonso full instructions on how to eliminate
programs that load and let him do what he wants. Let him suffer the
consequences.

God - I'm beginning to sound like the trolls whose advice is always
reformat :)

In truth, I wouldn't worry about an extended boot time.

I also notice that Alonso has not told us how long it used to take and
how long it now takes, or for that matter, what kind of laptop computer
it is. Maybe it was 1:10 and now it's 1:20; maybe it's a netbook :)
 
K

Ken Blake

I disagree with you and Ken, as well as Char and Boscoe.

I think we should give Alonso full instructions on how to eliminate
programs that load and let him do what he wants. Let him suffer the
consequences.

LOL!
 
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A

Alonso

Ken Blake said:
----------------

Its not malware issue, I have antivirus program installed. Dell Vostro 1520.
After updates, it takes 45 sec to load admin page. I didn't checked how much
it was before updates, but it was definitely *faster*. I can leave all
services as is without changing anything. But there is definitely something
wrong in microsoft technology if regular updates affects PC boot time.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

----------------

Its not malware issue, I have antivirus program installed. Dell Vostro 1520.
After updates, it takes 45 sec to load admin page. I didn't checked how much
it was before updates, but it was definitely *faster*. I can leave all
services as is without changing anything. But there is definitely something
wrong in microsoft technology if regular updates affects PC boot time.
I don't know what "admin page" is, but I can tell you that if someone
got my boot time down to 45 sec I would kiss that person, regardless of
gender or species.
 
K

KCB

Gene E. Bloch said:
I don't know what "admin page" is, but I can tell you that if someone
got my boot time down to 45 sec I would kiss that person, regardless of
gender or species.
45 seconds is exactly half the time it takes for me to get a 'useable'
desktop. That means no hourglass, and any item can be run.
 
C

Char Jackson

After updates, it takes 45 sec to load admin page. I didn't checked how much
it was before updates, but it was definitely *faster*. I can leave all
services as is without changing anything.
As the others have said, 45 seconds is awesome. Congrats.
But there is definitely something
wrong in microsoft technology if regular updates affects PC boot time.
How do you arrive at that conclusion? That makes no sense to me.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

As the others have said, 45 seconds is awesome. Congrats.


How do you arrive at that conclusion? That makes no sense to me.
Join the crowd :)
 
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P

Paul

Gene said:
Join the crowd :)
Regular updates are provided for security.

They don't usually include changes in design intent.

And from that perspective, there is no reason to expect changes.

I'd be looking for some AV product that has started scanning
early on, as a source of slowdown.

The OS is known to do a lot of caching or pre-caching, optimizations
to speed up various things. Perhaps an update has affected some
aspect of that.

*******

A tool used in the past for analysing startup, was "bootvis".

That is no longer supported, and doesn't exist for Windows 7.

If used as a search term though, it might dig up other third
party versions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootvis

http://www.tweakhound.com/xp/bootvis/ (pictures of results)

*******

Boot tracing is described here.
It uses the Windows Performance Toolkit.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/140247-trace-windows-7-bootshutdownhibernatestandbyresume-issues/

xbootmgr -trace hibernate -traceFlags BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER -resultPath C:\TEMP

which apparently starts a hibernate operation, and traces everything
until the system is booted again.

I'm sure that will be hours of fun. Like a lot of other
Microsoft debugging tools.

So there are tools, but it'll mean work.

Paul
 
A

Alonso

Paul said:
Regular updates are provided for security.

They don't usually include changes in design intent.

And from that perspective, there is no reason to expect changes.

I'd be looking for some AV product that has started scanning
early on, as a source of slowdown.

The OS is known to do a lot of caching or pre-caching, optimizations
to speed up various things. Perhaps an update has affected some
aspect of that.

*******

A tool used in the past for analysing startup, was "bootvis".

That is no longer supported, and doesn't exist for Windows 7.

If used as a search term though, it might dig up other third
party versions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootvis

http://www.tweakhound.com/xp/bootvis/ (pictures of results)

*******

Boot tracing is described here.
It uses the Windows Performance Toolkit.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/140247-trace-windows-7-bootshutdownhibernatestandbyresume-issues/

xbootmgr -trace hibernate -traceFlags
BASE+CSWITCH+DRIVERS+POWER -resultPath C:\TEMP

which apparently starts a hibernate operation, and traces everything
until the system is booted again.

I'm sure that will be hours of fun. Like a lot of other
Microsoft debugging tools.

So there are tools, but it'll mean work.

Paul --------------

Perhaps an update has affected some aspect of that.
Definitely, it changed something. 45sec is time between turn-on and
displaying windows password screen. Some people say 45sec is just fine, but
note, that this is new notebook, clean and not cluttered with multiple extra
programs and files. And it booted faster before upgrades. Perhaps the
difference was not so significant, but i noticed it, I just enjoyed how fast
it boots and fast work, compare with my old PC. Can Windows Malicious
Software Removal tool slow down boot by scanning files at boot time? Or
Windows Defender scan at boot time?
 
S

SC Tom

Alonso said:
Definitely, it changed something. 45sec is time between turn-on and
displaying windows password screen. Some people say 45sec is just fine,
but
note, that this is new notebook, clean and not cluttered with multiple
extra programs and files. And it booted faster before upgrades. Perhaps
the difference was not so significant, but i noticed it, I just enjoyed
how fast it boots and fast work, compare with my old PC. Can Windows
Malicious Software Removal tool slow down boot by scanning files at boot
time? Or Windows Defender scan at boot time?
If you are already using another AV program, you're asking for problems
running Defender, too. Most AV programs don't play well with each other.

The WMSR tool is a one-time scan, IIRC. Are your subsequent boots as "slow"
as the one immediately after the updates, or do you see it speeding up
again?

Look in the event logs and see if there are any warnings or errors that
occur around the same time as you boot up. That may give you a clue if
there's a problem or not.
 
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K

Ken Blake

If you are already using another AV program, you're asking for problems
running Defender, too. Most AV programs don't play well with each other.


Windows Defender is *not* an anti-virus program; it's an anti-spyware
program. Like most other anti-spyware programs, it plays just fine
with anti-virus programs in general.

One exception: Microsoft Security Essentials, AVG, Norton, and McAfee
(and perhaps some others) turns off Defender. That's good, not bad.
Not only is there potential conflict, but there's no reason to have
both; they all essentially have something very similar to Defender
built into them, and running both at once will hurt your performance
and create the risk of problems as they conflict with each other.
 

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