Windows explorer 7 search


W

W8CCW

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
..flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
 
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L

Len Hickman

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
Just type the same into the "Search programs and files" box at the
bottom of the start menu.

Works for me :)

Len
 
B

Big Steel

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
You can use Advanced Search. If it doesn't find it with Advanced search,
then the icons on the left side of the screen will show to refine the
search down to the the computer/drive letter/directory to search in.

Windows-key/f-key combination brings up Advanced Search.
 
K

KCB

W8CCW said:
I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
Don't you have a search box located upper right when you are in "My
Documents"?
 
P

Paul

W8CCW said:
I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
You could also consider using a separate search program. It
depends on what your time is worth to you, whether the time
could be spent learning all the details of Windows 7 search,
or just using a third party tool that "works".

Windows 7 search makes all sorts of assumptions that you're
a Rocket Scientist. Whereas, most people just want a tool
to find a particular file name, quickly, and with no fuss.
And for that reason, there is room for a third party tool
on your computer. It's just easier.

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r24040668-Windows-7-3rd-party-search-program

Paul
 
B

Big Steel

You could also consider using a separate search program. It
depends on what your time is worth to you, whether the time
could be spent learning all the details of Windows 7 search,
or just using a third party tool that "works".

Windows 7 search makes all sorts of assumptions that you're
a Rocket Scientist. Whereas, most people just want a tool
to find a particular file name, quickly, and with no fuss.
And for that reason, there is room for a third party tool
on your computer. It's just easier.

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r24040668-Windows-7-3rd-party-search-program
I find the Windows Vista and 7 search to be easy. But I read articles
that made them easy to use.
 
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J

James

Don't you have a search box located upper right when you are in "My
Documents"?

I use Google Search and xplorer2. xplorer2 has a freeware lite
version which is okay.
 
S

Stan Brown

You can use Advanced Search. If it doesn't find it with Advanced search,
then the icons on the left side of the screen will show to refine the
search down to the the computer/drive letter/directory to search in.

Windows-key/f-key combination brings up Advanced Search.
And there's also an Advanced Search box near the upper right of the
regular Explorer window, if I'm not mistaken.

I really don't feel like I've made Windows 7's search features part
of my bag of tricks yet -- something to work on!
 
M

Monty

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
You might try Everything search engine from http://www.voidtools.com/

This program catalogs all files and folders on your HDDs. After
installation you run the program and it takes a minute or two to
catalog your files and folders. After this, updating is done in real
time and searching is instantaneous (no time to even think about
coffee).

I keep an icon on the LHS of my desktop so that it is readily
accessable whenever I need it and I find it quicker to use than the
Windows7 search facility.
 
K

Kobac

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
If you decide to try the third-party program route, I would suggest
taking a look at Agent Ransack, AKA FileLocator Lite. It’s free for both
personal and commercial use.

It comes in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and runs on Windows
versions from 2000 up through Windows 7.

I’ve been using it for years, starting with XP and continuing through
Vista and Win 7. It integrates right into the right-click menu of
Windows Explorer if desired. It does not use indexing and so will not
stay resident and use resources until you decide to run it, but it is
FAST, especially the 64-bit version.
 
T

Todd

I have some *.flv fles I saved with Freecorder on a particular
woodworking process. I would like to review them and execute the
process. I cannot find what I did with them. In XP I would just start
a *.flv search in My Documents and take a break. When I returned the
.flv's would be located and I could relocate the folders I need.

How do I do this in Win 7?
You are not doing anything wrong. W7 search really stinks.
Try instead:

http://super-finder.en.softonic.com/

-T
 
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S

Sunny Bard

Kobac said:
If you decide to try the third-party program route, I would suggest
taking a look at Agent Ransack, AKA FileLocator Lite.
seconded.
 
G

Gordon

You are not doing anything wrong. W7 search really stinks.
The only wrong thing he's doing, is NOT using the Search box!
Windows 7 search works perfectly OK and well here....
 
J

Jeff Layman

The only wrong thing he's doing, is NOT using the Search box!
Windows 7 search works perfectly OK and well here....
Not really. Firstly, it indexes contents as well as file names. That
makes it a security risk.

Secondly, even if you turn off the indexing (and just use it like XP's
search), it is pretty slow. I just asked it to search for *.doc in C:\.
It took 45 seconds before anything appeared on the screen, and then
about a dozen files appeared (why? Why not list files as it finds them).
It stopped after 145 seconds, having found 90 files.

Agent Ransack listed files as it went along, and took 25 seconds to
complete the search, having found 34 files. FileCommander found the
same files in about 35 seconds.

So why the difference? The W7 search found dozens of files called
HPAdvisor.MainFrame.Windows.DockViewWindow.User.Marketing.dock.
In other words, it found *.dock files as well as *.doc files. But it
failed to include any *.doc files in the recycle bin. Those are, of
course, still available for use if they are restored.
 
W

W8CCW

If you decide to try the third-party program route, I would suggest
taking a look at Agent Ransack, AKA FileLocator Lite. It’s free for both
personal and commercial use.

It comes in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and runs on Windows
versions from 2000 up through Windows 7.

I’ve been using it for years, starting with XP and continuing through
Vista and Win 7. It integrates right into the right-click menu of
Windows Explorer if desired. It does not use indexing and so will not
stay resident and use resources until you decide to run it, but it is
FAST, especially the 64-bit version.
I tried to load Agent Ransack before and it did not work for me. I
will try again. I like it on XP.
 
B

Big Steel

Not really. Firstly, it indexes contents as well as file names. That
makes it a security risk.
It's a little over the top with the Chicken Little. :)
 
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R

Retroman

Firstly, it indexes contents as well as file names. That
makes it a security risk.
It appears that you favor protecting the user from him or herself by not
letting them search the content of their own files. If you really want to
do that to yourself, simply disable content indexing.
Secondly, even if you turn off the indexing (and just use it like XP's
search), it is pretty slow. I just asked it to search for *.doc in C:\.
It took 45 seconds before anything appeared on the screen, and then
about a dozen files appeared (why? Why not list files as it finds them).
It stopped after 145 seconds, having found 90 files.
[snip]
So why the difference? The W7 search found dozens of files called
HPAdvisor.MainFrame.Windows.DockViewWindow.User.Marketing.dock.
In other words, it found *.dock files as well as *.doc files. But it
failed to include any *.doc files in the recycle bin. Those are, of
course, still available for use if they are restored.
Unfortunately, this comparison is worthless because you (and the other
respondents in this thread) have not learned the basics of using Windows
Search 4. The query syntax has changed. The correct query to find files
with a given extension is to use the ext property, like this:

ext:doc

That searches *only* file extensions, not file names or contents. It is
fast, accurate, and does indeed include items in the recycle bin. The
query that you used searches all strings, including content and file
names, which of course is much slower and returns many unwanted results.

Using a property query on a file extension, my Vista PC took only 45
seconds to complete a search of all locations on C drive, including system
files. Excluding system files shortened the time to 20 seconds.

Wild card searches are rarely needed now and I almost never use them. You
can learn about the new query syntax here:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/winfamily/desktopsearch/technicalresources/advquery.mspx

Doug M. in NJ
 
J

Jeff Layman

It appears that you favor protecting the user from him or herself by not
letting them search the content of their own files.
No, the problem is the database which is created. I can't remember the
webpage link now, as it was about 18 months ago I looked at it, but it
referred to the availability of programs to extract information from the
database file produced by indexing. The problem is that anyone with
access to an open computer could simply copy the database to a memory
stick, and extract the info at their leisure. Unless the location on
the disk been changed, it is always at the same place. Even if that
file was 100Mb, it would take only a few tens of seconds to copy it to
the stick. Contrast that with having to look through a C: drive trying
to find the "interesting" stuff. True, you could copy the "My
Documents" folder and hope for the best, but the database is a lot easier.

Far too much is indexed by default, IMHO. The vast majority of users
will have no idea that almost everything they do on their computer
(including browsing history?) is going into that database.

If you really want to
do that to yourself, simply disable content indexing.
I did as soon as I realised what all that disk activity was all about.
I turned off the service as well.
Secondly, even if you turn off the indexing (and just use it like XP's
search), it is pretty slow. I just asked it to search for *.doc in C:\.
It took 45 seconds before anything appeared on the screen, and then
about a dozen files appeared (why? Why not list files as it finds them).
It stopped after 145 seconds, having found 90 files.
[snip]
So why the difference? The W7 search found dozens of files called
HPAdvisor.MainFrame.Windows.DockViewWindow.User.Marketing.dock.
In other words, it found *.dock files as well as *.doc files. But it
failed to include any *.doc files in the recycle bin. Those are, of
course, still available for use if they are restored.
Unfortunately, this comparison is worthless because you (and the other
respondents in this thread) have not learned the basics of using Windows
Search 4. The query syntax has changed. The correct query to find files
with a given extension is to use the ext property, like this:

ext:doc
I couldn't find this within "Help" on my laptop. Why the change from
the asterisk which everyone has used for years? If they wanted to make
a new, more powerful search, it's a pity MS couldn't have used something
to equate an * to ext: (maybe equivalent to a junction point for
compatibility, if you see what I mean).
That searches *only* file extensions, not file names or contents. It is
fast, accurate, and does indeed include items in the recycle bin. The
query that you used searches all strings, including content and file
names, which of course is much slower and returns many unwanted results.
Didn't work for me. Still takes ages to come up with the first files it
finds. It still found all the *.dock files and no recycle bin files.
Also found 20 further files such as
/GetContent.aspx?assetID=0e88efcb-0f3f-4a37-8ccc-331c81b96adc&documentSet=en-US&Prod=WIN700&Market=GB.
I don't know where it got those from as everything other than "name"
was blank. I thought originally they might be from Firefox which I had
open at the time. I closed it and repeated the search and up they
popped again. From right-clicking on "Properties" it became apparent
these were jpg or xml files. In "General" the location of the file
above is given as:
http://content.windows.microsoft.com/BetterWhenConnectedHelpWS/GetContent.aspx?assetID=0e88efcb-0f3f-4a37-8ccc-331c81b96adc&documentSet=en-US&Prod=WIN700&Market=GB.


Then I realised I had copied the "ext:doc" you stated and used that to
search. From the link you gave to the advance search query syntax, I
see that it should be "ext:.doc". That made you difference! Exactly
the same result.
Using a property query on a file extension, my Vista PC took only 45
seconds to complete a search of all locations on C drive, including system
files. Excluding system files shortened the time to 20 seconds.
But we are talking about Win7, not Vista. I note that at the top of the
link you refer to below, it starts "Once you have Windows Search for
Windows Vista or Windows XP...". However, it didn't pop up a warning
that it didn't refer to the OS I am using, so maybe it does apply to
Win7 as well.
Wild card searches are rarely needed now and I almost never use them.
Then you have a lot better memory than me! IME, I almost never needed
to search the content of files.

You
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I tried to load Agent Ransack before and it did not work for me. I
will try again. I like it on XP.
Works fine here[1], although I'm using it by its alias, FileLocator.
Same program, according to their website.

[1] I've used it on two Win 7 machines with nary a problem.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

It's a little over the top with the Chicken Little. :)
+1

I thought, a Trojan can be written search the files for content w/o
using the index, what difference does having an index make?
 

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