Windows 8 release?


A

Antares 531

What's the latest on the release of Windows 8? That is, when will it
be available in the local computer stores?
 
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P

Paul

Antares said:
What's the latest on the release of Windows 8? That is, when will it
be available in the local computer stores?
The Windows 8 Release Preview, will operate until early next
year. You can download this now, install it, and use a real
copy of Windows 8 later.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/iso

64-bit (x64) Download (3.3 GB)
32-bit (x86) Download (2.5 GB)
Product Key: TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF

"the Release Preview will expire on 15 January 2013"

As a result of these options, it's not critical to know
the date of release (October or so). As long as the release
is not delayed past Jan.15, everything will be fine.

So if you want to play with it, you can play with it now.
And then, upgrade January 14th, 2013, using the copy
which will be in the computer store by then.

And besides, it doesn't have to come from the computer store.
You'll be able to buy it electronically and download it.
In the following example, you can see how much fun it is
to do electronic transactions. So when it does become
available, you don't even need to leave your house to get it.

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...al-river/b71fd811-9fed-4b67-87e8-52b4d2bac429

Paul
 
V

VanguardLH

Antares said:
What's the latest on the release of Windows 8? That is, when will it
be available in the local computer stores?
The Windows 8 newsgroup is over there ---> alt.comp.os.windows-8
 
A

Antares 531

The Windows 8 Release Preview, will operate until early next
year. You can download this now, install it, and use a real
copy of Windows 8 later.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/iso

64-bit (x64) Download (3.3 GB)
32-bit (x86) Download (2.5 GB)
Product Key: TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF

"the Release Preview will expire on 15 January 2013"

As a result of these options, it's not critical to know
the date of release (October or so). As long as the release
is not delayed past Jan.15, everything will be fine.

So if you want to play with it, you can play with it now.
And then, upgrade January 14th, 2013, using the copy
which will be in the computer store by then.

And besides, it doesn't have to come from the computer store.
You'll be able to buy it electronically and download it.
In the following example, you can see how much fun it is
to do electronic transactions. So when it does become
available, you don't even need to leave your house to get it.

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...al-river/b71fd811-9fed-4b67-87e8-52b4d2bac429

Paul
Thanks, Paul. I somehow had the idea that the full blown version was
to be released sometime about mid 2012. I don't really need to go
through the process of downloading a Release Preview for each of our
household computers. I was just giving some thought to "standardizing"
all four of our computers so I wouldn't have to remember the
intricacies of each computer's OS.

Gordon
 
P

Paul

Antares said:
Thanks, Paul. I somehow had the idea that the full blown version was
to be released sometime about mid 2012. I don't really need to go
through the process of downloading a Release Preview for each of our
household computers. I was just giving some thought to "standardizing"
all four of our computers so I wouldn't have to remember the
intricacies of each computer's OS.

Gordon
You download one copy, either burn a DVD or use a USB flash key,
and install the same stuff to all four computers. The Product Key
is the same for each installation. TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF.

When you buy the retail version later, they give you a unique key
for each copy purchased. The key in that case, doesn't have an
expiry date, like the one above does.

I recommend trying out the free copy of Windows 8 first.
If you don't like it, you can buy four copies of Windows 7 instead.

Paul
 
A

Andy

Thanks for the link

--
AL'S COMPUTERS
Paul said:
The Windows 8 Release Preview, will operate until early next
year. You can download this now, install it, and use a real
copy of Windows 8 later.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/iso

64-bit (x64) Download (3.3 GB)
32-bit (x86) Download (2.5 GB)
Product Key: TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF

"the Release Preview will expire on 15 January 2013"

As a result of these options, it's not critical to know
the date of release (October or so). As long as the release
is not delayed past Jan.15, everything will be fine.

So if you want to play with it, you can play with it now.
And then, upgrade January 14th, 2013, using the copy
which will be in the computer store by then.

And besides, it doesn't have to come from the computer store.
You'll be able to buy it electronically and download it.
In the following example, you can see how much fun it is
to do electronic transactions. So when it does become
available, you don't even need to leave your house to get it.

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...al-river/b71fd811-9fed-4b67-87e8-52b4d2bac429

Paul
 
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A

Antares 531

You download one copy, either burn a DVD or use a USB flash key,
and install the same stuff to all four computers. The Product Key
is the same for each installation. TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF.

When you buy the retail version later, they give you a unique key
for each copy purchased. The key in that case, doesn't have an
expiry date, like the one above does.

I recommend trying out the free copy of Windows 8 first.
If you don't like it, you can buy four copies of Windows 7 instead.

Paul
Paul, I seem to be confused about this, somehow. I downloaded a copy
of the Windows8-Release Preview 64 bit English ISO Images file...took
about 6 hours...then I downloaded a copy of the ReleasePreview-Upgrade
file...took just a few seconds.

But I can't figure out how to move on from here. When I try to open
the Preview ISO Images file it starts the DVD+R disk burner process
and burns a copy onto a CD, but I can't get it to go any farther.

When I try to open the Release Preview Setup file it initiates the
process of downloading the Preview ISO Image file, again. I don't need
a second copy of this large file.

What am I missing, here? How should I proceed?

Thanks, Gordon
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Paul, I seem to be confused about this, somehow. I downloaded a copy
of the Windows8-Release Preview 64 bit English ISO Images file...took
about 6 hours...then I downloaded a copy of the ReleasePreview-Upgrade
file...took just a few seconds.

But I can't figure out how to move on from here. When I try to open
the Preview ISO Images file it starts the DVD+R disk burner process
and burns a copy onto a CD, but I can't get it to go any farther.

When I try to open the Release Preview Setup file it initiates the
process of downloading the Preview ISO Image file, again. I don't need
a second copy of this large file.

What am I missing, here? How should I proceed?

Thanks, Gordon
Ignore (i.e., don't use) the Release Preview Setup file.

Boot from the CD and follow on from there - or if you can't, load the CD
on your drive and run the exe file on it. On my CD it's called
setup.exe.

If you can't boot from the CD you probably have burned the iso as a data
file onto the disk. You need to burn the iso as a CD, not as a file.
Programs like CDBurnerXP make the distinction clear.

BTW, is it a CD or a DVD? Mine is 3.27 GB...OK, I know, you're just
using generic language, so ignore this :)
 
A

Antares 531

Ignore (i.e., don't use) the Release Preview Setup file.

Boot from the CD and follow on from there - or if you can't, load the CD
on your drive and run the exe file on it. On my CD it's called
setup.exe.

If you can't boot from the CD you probably have burned the iso as a data
file onto the disk. You need to burn the iso as a CD, not as a file.
Programs like CDBurnerXP make the distinction clear.

BTW, is it a CD or a DVD? Mine is 3.27 GB...OK, I know, you're just
using generic language, so ignore this :)
Thanks, Gene. I had wondered what I might get into if I went this way,
but I guess it's okay to do so. I'll give it a try later. First I've
got to figure out what went wrong with my Ethernet connection in that
computer. I may have to change/replace the Ethernet card. It seems to
have failed for some reason.
 
C

Char Jackson

Paul, I seem to be confused about this, somehow. I downloaded a copy
of the Windows8-Release Preview 64 bit English ISO Images file...took
about 6 hours...then I downloaded a copy of the ReleasePreview-Upgrade
file...took just a few seconds.

But I can't figure out how to move on from here. When I try to open
the Preview ISO Images file it starts the DVD+R disk burner process
and burns a copy onto a CD, but I can't get it to go any farther.

When I try to open the Release Preview Setup file it initiates the
process of downloading the Preview ISO Image file, again. I don't need
a second copy of this large file.

What am I missing, here? How should I proceed?
No offense, but are you sure you're a good candidate for what you're
trying to do? ;-)
 
P

Paul

Antares said:
Paul, I seem to be confused about this, somehow. I downloaded a copy
of the Windows8-Release Preview 64 bit English ISO Images file...took
about 6 hours...then I downloaded a copy of the ReleasePreview-Upgrade
file...took just a few seconds.

But I can't figure out how to move on from here. When I try to open
the Preview ISO Images file it starts the DVD+R disk burner process
and burns a copy onto a CD, but I can't get it to go any farther.

When I try to open the Release Preview Setup file it initiates the
process of downloading the Preview ISO Image file, again. I don't need
a second copy of this large file.

What am I missing, here? How should I proceed?

Thanks, Gordon
A file that is 2.5GB or 3.3GB in size, is going to take
a while to download. That's what you're looking for,
a big-ass file. Not some 500KB waste-of-time teaser file.

The files are small enough, they'll fit within the max
file limit of FAT32.

You want to download the ISO9660 file, as that is what you'll
be burning a single layer DVD disc with.

You can use a tool such as Imgburn to take the ISO9660 file
and make a bootable DVD from it. You do not just "drag and
drop" that file onto the DVD. The burner program has to
convert the ISO9660 file, to make a bootable DVD. And
Imgburn (and Nero) know how to do that. Imgburn is free.

On the target machine, the optical drive must be able to
read a DVD for this to work. If you have a really old
computer with a CD-only drive, that's not going to work
when it comes time to read a DVD.

The Microsoftstore has a utility that can copy the info
to a USB key. But as long as you've got a DVD blank to
work with, just stick with that. It'll take the rest of
the day, before you get that stupid utility working. I had
problems with it the first time. And not all computers
boot from USB properly.

*******

You can use this info to verify your download. I have copies of both.

Windows8-ReleasePreview-64bit-English.iso
3,515,703,296 bytes
MD5SUM = 5901db43f3b3fa155d65f523f76d5d88

Windows8-ReleasePreview-32bit-English.iso
2,615,529,472 bytes
MD5SUM = 7285da50a07e33bc3b5a20e48afaf375

You can compute an MD5SUM from the command line.
A program you can use, is FCIV from Microsoft.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/841290

The command line incantation is like this, only
both fciv.exe and the ISO9660 file would need to be
in the same directory, and your command prompt window
would have to be CD'ed to the folder with this stuff
in it. If you can't figure out how to work this,
don't worry about it, and just use the size in bytes
as a check.

fciv -md5 Windows8-ReleasePreview-64bit-English.iso

fciv -md5 Windows8-ReleasePreview-32bit-English.iso

HTH,
Paul
 
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P

Paul

Char said:
No offense, but are you sure you're a good candidate for what you're
trying to do? ;-)
Shame on you. Bad tech support guy... Bad... Knotty dog.

He's just got to burn a bootable DVD using the big file. No problemo.

I saw the sign on the back of his car and it said

"Windows 8 or Bust"

He's going to make it.

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

You can download the Windows 8 DVD and install and use it until Jan.15
next year.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/iso

64-bit (x64) Download (3.3 GB)
32-bit (x86) Download (2.5 GB)
Product Key: TK8TP-9JN6P-7X7WW-RFFTV-B7QPF

"the Release Preview will expire on 15 January 2013"

Note - be careful where, and how, you install that. Like
any dual-boot install, you could mess up your regular OS
(whatever that is). Your options are, to either do a
complete backup (so you can restore from any damage), or
just disconnect some drives and use a spare for the install.
My choice was to install in VMware, i.e. a virtual machine.

Now all I need to do is to find it interesting enough to play with it a
second time :)
 
K

Ken Blake

My choice was to install in VMware, i.e. a virtual machine.

That's certainly much safer than using it to replace what Windows you
were running before. I've done the same, in Oracle VM VirtualBox.

Now all I need to do is to find it interesting enough to play with it a
second time :)

I too have played with it only a little (but more than once). I don't
have the time to play with it a lot, and to tell the truth, I'm really
not interested. I'll probably install the release version when it
comes out, and replace Windows 7 with it. But I haven't decided yet.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I agree. I will be getting a new Computer before they stop selling Win
7.
You could anticipate the problem and buy a copy before they kill sales.

You'd end up paying for two Windowses if you then buy a computer with 8,
but heck, you're wealthy, right?
 
C

choro

You could anticipate the problem and buy a copy before they kill sales.

You'd end up paying for two Windowses if you then buy a computer with 8,
but heck, you're wealthy, right?
Just wait until they introduce Win 8. THEN you buy a Win 7 laptop or
desktop which are BOUND to be put on special offer to get rid of old
stocks. That's the clever way of doing it.

But IF I were going to build my own desktop, then again I would be
screwed less hard as legal copies of Windows 7 in all its versions will
also come down in price.

I always feel that MS take advantage of madsters like I who build their
own computers even when they buy the OEM version of the OS as opposed to
the Retail Version. I am sure they charge big laptop manufacturers like
Toshiba and Dell etc a pittance for the OS. This is unfair as it
exploits people who build their own computers.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Blake
As always, each successive "pre-release" release is closer to the
final version than the one before. But how close to the final release
it is, nobody knows, and in my view, it's foolhardy for anyone to
think of it as Windows 8. As I said, Windows 8 has not yet been
released.
[]
Yes. To give an example: I use an ancient internet suite (mail, news,
ping, finger, etc.) called Turnpike. It is somewhat closely bound to the
Windows Explorer shell (under desktop I see a "folder" called Turnpike,
under which I see "folders" for mail, news, etcetera).

This could be made to work under Vista, though you needed to cackle
(issue two CACLS command lines) once, around the time you installed it.
The same procedure makes it work with Windows 7 32-bit - and did with
Windows 7 64-bit, right up to the final release - but not including it.
Microsoft broke something in the final release (which they didn't fix in
SP1 either).

(I am still using XP, so not bothered, except by the eventual demise of
that; if I have to get a new computer, I'll probably go to Thunderbird
for my email and news.)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Blake
I too have played with it only a little (but more than once). I don't
have the time to play with it a lot, and to tell the truth, I'm really
not interested. I'll probably install the release version when it
comes out, and replace Windows 7 with it. But I haven't decided yet.
Nice to be so rich that the cost of such is clearly not a major
consideration!
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, choro <[email protected]>
writes:
[]
I always feel that MS take advantage of madsters like I who build their
own computers even when they buy the OEM version of the OS as opposed
to the Retail Version. I am sure they charge big laptop manufacturers
like Toshiba and Dell etc a pittance for the OS. This is unfair as it
exploits people who build their own computers.
-- (add a space)
choro
*****
I feel that too. Of course, they'd say that we cost them a lot more in
support, but of course that's bollocks as they don't provide any such
support. That pricing policy, IMO, is what more or less killed home
assembly of computers - or, at least, turned it very much into the
enthusiast market it is today. Certainly, it used to be possible to save
enough, by self-assembly, that it was really worth doing for that reason
alone: now the only reason is to ensure you get exactly what you want
(and, almost as important, so you don't get anything you don't want).
 
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D

DJT

In message <[email protected]>, choro <[email protected]>
writes:
[]
I always feel that MS take advantage of madsters like I who build their
own computers even when they buy the OEM version of the OS as opposed
to the Retail Version. I am sure they charge big laptop manufacturers
like Toshiba and Dell etc a pittance for the OS. This is unfair as it
exploits people who build their own computers.
-- (add a space)
choro
*****
I feel that too. Of course, they'd say that we cost them a lot more in
support, but of course that's bollocks as they don't provide any such
support. That pricing policy, IMO, is what more or less killed home
assembly of computers - or, at least, turned it very much into the
enthusiast market it is today. Certainly, it used to be possible to save
enough, by self-assembly, that it was really worth doing for that reason
alone: now the only reason is to ensure you get exactly what you want
(and, almost as important, so you don't get anything you don't want).
I have given up actually building my own. I have a Computer supplier
that builds a computer from my specs for only $100 more than component
cost.
The idea of buying a copy of Win 7 seperately is good


DJT
 

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