Windows 7 Updates


G

Good Guy

Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and
2010. The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so
that I could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I
decide to reformat the HD and start all over again.

I have created an image of the HD but would prefer if I have these
updates on my flash drive so that I create the appropriate batch file
when it is necessary to re-install them again.

I can create pictures of the window like this:

<http://goo.gl/V3Edh>

but it is not convenient to copy the kb numbers when searching on
Microsoft website.

Thanks.

--
Good Guy
Website: http://mytaxsite.co.uk
Website: http://html-css.co.uk
Forums: http://mytaxsite.boardhost.com
Email: http://mytaxsite.co.uk/contact-us
 
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C

Char Jackson

Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and
2010. The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so
that I could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I
decide to reformat the HD and start all over again.
Sorry, no help from me with your request, but why not just download
them when you need them? Your PC will know which ones it needs,
specific dependencies, installation order, etc.
 
P

Paul

Good said:
Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and
2010. The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so
that I could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I
decide to reformat the HD and start all over again.

I have created an image of the HD but would prefer if I have these
updates on my flash drive so that I create the appropriate batch file
when it is necessary to re-install them again.

I can create pictures of the window like this:

<http://goo.gl/V3Edh>

but it is not convenient to copy the kb numbers when searching on
Microsoft website.

Thanks.
If you're serious about these kinds of things, you could use Autopatcher.
I've heard of this before, but have no first hand experience with it.

http://lifehacker.com/5488259/autopatcher-keeps-windows-7-systems-up-to-date

To avoid the Microsoft lawyers, the Autopatcher design still downloads
the files straight from Microsoft. That avoids Autopatcher storing the
updates on their own server, and feeling the wrath of Microsoft. So the
updates still come from Microsoft, and the Autopatcher software
simply provides guidance on what to download and when.

I think the idea is, you build a folder somewhere on your site, with the
updates in it. And then, if you need to update equipment at a later date,
you update using the folder of stuff already downloaded.

Which sorta sounds like what you're trying to do.

That might be easier than trying to hack your own scheme (assuming it
works).

If it works out for you, post back the details.

As far as I know, the value of Autopatcher, is the developers update
the database after each patch is released by Microsoft. If they get
tired of doing it (which happened for Win2K), that's when the "wheels
fall off" the scheme. It's only as good, as their ability to populate
their database with good information. More than one person is involved,
and one guy might do Win2K, another guy does WinXP, and so on. It would be
terribly boring work after a while (i.e. you'd want to get paid for it).

Paul
 
R

Rob

Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and
2010. The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so
that I could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I
decide to reformat the HD and start all over again.

I have created an image of the HD but would prefer if I have these
updates on my flash drive so that I create the appropriate batch file
when it is necessary to re-install them again.

I can create pictures of the window like this:

<http://goo.gl/V3Edh>

but it is not convenient to copy the kb numbers when searching on
Microsoft website.

Thanks.

What a silly idea.

When you update, W7 will download more updates then that needed anyway.

The main update download is SP1 and let windows update do the remainder.


That is unless you have a problem using windows update.
 
E

Ed Cryer

Good said:
Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and
2010. The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so
that I could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I
decide to reformat the HD and start all over again.

I have created an image of the HD but would prefer if I have these
updates on my flash drive so that I create the appropriate batch file
when it is necessary to re-install them again.

I can create pictures of the window like this:

<http://goo.gl/V3Edh>

but it is not convenient to copy the kb numbers when searching on
Microsoft website.

Thanks.
I think I can see what you're after, and particularly what you're trying
to circumvent and avoid.

But I have some advice.
Take system images instead. They'll include latest updates.
Computers have come on since the early days of "reformat and reinstall
to get back to good performance". And Win7 is pretty good with
self-maintenance.
Sys images are better too for cases where malware has got in and is hard
to eradicate.

Ed
 
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S

Seth

Paul said:
If you're serious about these kinds of things, you could use Autopatcher.
I've heard of this before, but have no first hand experience with it.

http://lifehacker.com/5488259/autopatcher-keeps-windows-7-systems-up-to-date
WSUSOFFLINE is what I use at work where I am responsible for the base image
used in our builds. Anytime I am creating a new image I use WSUSOFFLINE to
create an update folder and with 1 batch file process them all against the
new image.
 
G

Good Guy

Belarc Advisor does this, you can save the report as html or text:
http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html
Fantastic. This is exactly what I wanted. It does exactly what I
wanted. The idea is to have an archive of all updates so that I can
install them before going online. Obviously, I am aware that when SP2
comes out this list would be obsolete but at least the framework is in
place and can be updated on a regular basis.

--
Good Guy
Website: http://mytaxsite.co.uk
Website: http://html-css.co.uk
Forums: http://mytaxsite.boardhost.com
Email: http://mytaxsite.co.uk/contact-us
 
J

Joe Morris

Good Guy said:
Is anybody aware of how can one print or download the complete list of
updates already installed on a system? My machine has 258 updates
including some for Microsoft Applications like Office 2003, 2007 and 2010.
The idea is to get a download of this list in a spreadsheet so that I
could download these from Microsoft website for future use when I decide
to reformat the HD and start all over again.
For the Windows patches open a command prompt window and run:

WMIC QFE GET HOTFIXID /VALUE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.TXT

(or redirect to any other file). For a more spiffy display use this:

WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM

and then display the resulting file in your browser.


Joe
 
D

Dave-UK

Joe Morris said:
For the Windows patches open a command prompt window and run:

WMIC QFE GET HOTFIXID /VALUE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.TXT

(or redirect to any other file). For a more spiffy display use this:

WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM

and then display the resulting file in your browser.


Joe
Apparently there's a bug in Windows 7 because when I run this:
WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM
I get this error:
'Invalid XSL format (or) file name'
A possible fix is listed here:
http://www.ctkn.net/tag/invalid-xsl-format-or-file-name/
Although, even when I've copied the xsl files over, I still get the error.
 
C

Char Jackson

Apparently there's a bug in Windows 7 because when I run this:
WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM
I get this error:
'Invalid XSL format (or) file name'
A possible fix is listed here:
http://www.ctkn.net/tag/invalid-xsl-format-or-file-name/
Although, even when I've copied the xsl files over, I still get the error.
That command worked properly for me, creating a nicely formatted html
document. I'm using Win 7 SP1 Ultimate.
 
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D

Dave \Crash\ Dummy

That command worked properly for me, creating a nicely formatted html
document. I'm using Win 7 SP1 Ultimate.
Works fine for me, Win 7 SP1 Ultimate x64.

For more information on this and other command line utilities, open
Windows Help and search for "command reference."
 
J

Joe Morris

Apparently there's a bug in Windows 7 because when I run this:
WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM
I get this error:
'Invalid XSL format (or) file name'
A possible fix is listed here:
http://www.ctkn.net/tag/invalid-xsl-format-or-file-name/
Although, even when I've copied the xsl files over, I still get the error.
Try the minimal command WMIC QFE and see if it fails. And do other WMIC
queries work? For example:

WMIC COMPUTERSYSTEM GET * /VALUE

(The "GET * /VALUE" controls the format of the output: get all settings
under COMPUTERSYSTEM and output them with each line showing the setting name
and its value.)

WMIC /? will list the most popular of the query names. Incidentally,
"QFE" stands for "Quick Fix Engineering".

Joe
 
D

Dave-UK

Joe Morris said:
Try the minimal command WMIC QFE and see if it fails. And do other WMIC
queries work? For example:

WMIC COMPUTERSYSTEM GET * /VALUE

(The "GET * /VALUE" controls the format of the output: get all settings
under COMPUTERSYSTEM and output them with each line showing the setting name
and its value.)

WMIC /? will list the most popular of the query names. Incidentally,
"QFE" stands for "Quick Fix Engineering".

Joe
The command 'WMIC QFE' works ok as does ' WMIC COMPUTERSYSTEM GET * /VALUE'
I think the problem (on my box - win7 Pro sp1) is the /Format switch.
 
E

Ed Cryer

Dave-UK said:
Apparently there's a bug in Windows 7 because when I run this:
WMIC QFE LIST FULL /FORMAT:HTABLE > %TEMP%\HOTFIX.HTM
I get this error:
'Invalid XSL format (or) file name'
A possible fix is listed here:
http://www.ctkn.net/tag/invalid-xsl-format-or-file-name/
Although, even when I've copied the xsl files over, I still get the error.
Hi Dave. The same happens with me too, also in UK. I have Win7 HP SP1 X64.

Ed
 
D

Dave-UK

Ed Cryer said:
Hi Dave. The same happens with me too, also in UK. I have Win7 HP SP1 X64.

Ed
It's a conspiracy !! :)
I can get a ' /format:table ' switch to work, but that just creates a block of text.
But the ' /format:htable ' switch just errors out.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Char Jackson said:
Sorry, no help from me with your request, but why not just download
them when you need them? Your PC will know which ones it needs,
specific dependencies, installation order, etc.
Well, the OP has explained he wants to be able to get them before going
online, but I'd also add the possibility that they will not be available
for ever,
 
C

Char Jackson

Well, the OP has explained he wants to be able to get them before going
online, but I'd also add the possibility that they will not be available
for ever,
Yeah, I didn't buy his explanation and I don't buy yours. Different
strokes for different folks, though. :)
 
J

Joe Morris

It's a conspiracy !! :)
I can get a ' /format:table ' switch to work, but that just creates a
block of text.
But the ' /format:htable ' switch just errors out.
Can't help you there; although I'll note that on a tiny fraction of the
~7000 systems I support I've seen WMI completely fail...and never been able
to figure out why. (It's probably related to whatever strange programs some
of the users have installed - and yes, the users in R&D need to have admin
rights and install odd stuff.)

Getting back to the original question, though, the unformatted output you
get from the first example command above will get you a list of the Windows
patches installed (with lots of blank lines at no extra charge). Additonal
data about each patch is available; replace "HOTFIXID" in the command by an
asterisk to see them all. You can see the available items by listing them
for one hotfix:

WMIC QFE WHERE (HOTFIXID="KB95848") GET * /VALUE

Incidentally: the WMIC command is incredibly fragile and at the same time is
stingy with diagnostics when it fails. If you are fluent in PowerShell
there's a lot of ability to excavate hotfix info from WMI, including info
about the Office patches. There are several Microsoft blogs on using POSH
to access WMI data.

Joe
 
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D

Dave-UK

Joe Morris said:
Can't help you there; although I'll note that on a tiny fraction of the
~7000 systems I support I've seen WMI completely fail...and never been able
to figure out why. (It's probably related to whatever strange programs some
of the users have installed - and yes, the users in R&D need to have admin
rights and install odd stuff.)

Getting back to the original question, though, the unformatted output you
get from the first example command above will get you a list of the Windows
patches installed (with lots of blank lines at no extra charge). Additonal
data about each patch is available; replace "HOTFIXID" in the command by an
asterisk to see them all. You can see the available items by listing them
for one hotfix:

WMIC QFE WHERE (HOTFIXID="KB95848") GET * /VALUE

Incidentally: the WMIC command is incredibly fragile and at the same time is
stingy with diagnostics when it fails. If you are fluent in PowerShell
there's a lot of ability to excavate hotfix info from WMI, including info
about the Office patches. There are several Microsoft blogs on using POSH
to access WMI data.

Joe
Thanks for that. I occasionally have a play around with PowerShell, but only for
my amusement, nothing serious. I like to have some understanding since I realised
that most of the Microsoft Fixit programs are PowerShell scripts.
 

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