What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?


S

Steve Hayes

I'm not sure I'd agree with this.

ADSL and dialup have a lot of similarities.

On dialup, 33K (or less) modems could be connected straight though
the analog telephone network. Even if the telephone company
equipment happened to be digital, all it needed to emulate
was 4KHz of analog bandwidth (8KHz Nyquist sampling).
The point about a modem, in the literal sense, is that it turns the 1s and 0s
of a digital signal into audible tones, sends them down the line, and they are
converted back into 1s and 0s at the other end.

An ADSL router does not.
 
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K

Ken Blake

The point about a modem, in the literal sense, is that it turns the 1s and 0s
of a digital signal into audible tones, sends them down the line, and they are
converted back into 1s and 0s at the other end.

An ADSL router does not.

Exactly!
 
P

Pfsszxt

R. C. White has written on 9/2/2013 9:02 PM:

Since you're as old as I am, then, yes, you're an old man! ;-)
welcome to the club! I'm also 78 and started with PC's
with the first TRS80 (before floppy disks were invented!)
 
P

Pfsszxt

The US life expectancy is now 78.7 years. I divide that into three
equal categories:

0- 26.2 years Young
26.2 - 52.4 years Middle-aged
52.4 - 78.7 years Old

Everybody older than 78.7 is superannuated! <vbg>

I can't remember when your birthday is, so I'm not sure whether you
are old or superannuated. If you're not superannuated yet, you will be
soon. I'm still old, but in three years I'll catch up with you and
also be superannuated (if I'm still alive). <g>
Well, I'm 78.7 exactly ( I presume the .7 refers to months ?
If it's actually a decimal statistic, I'm only 78.58 !
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, Ken.

Looks like I'll Superannuate (That's like Graduate - and the spell checker
didn't barf at that word) next March - just about the start of next Spring.
;<)

My CPA partner and I were looking at IRS expected-life tables many years
ago. We noted that at age 10, we could have expected to live 68.4 more
years - to 78.4. If we made it to 30, we could expect 49.2 more years,
giving us to 79.2. If we got to 60, we could expect 22.4 more, to 82.4.
"Wow!", Don said, "The older you get, the older you get!"

Now I'm looking at the table that says if I make it to 80, I can expect 7.8
more years after that, so I'm going to stop worrying for a while. ;<)

So just keep living and you'll be superannuated, too, before you know it.
;<}

RC


"Ken Blake" wrote in message

Hi, Dale.

How old is an "old man"? I'm 78. Am I old?

The US life expectancy is now 78.7 years. I divide that into three
equal categories:

0- 26.2 years Young
26.2 - 52.4 years Middle-aged
52.4 - 78.7 years Old

Everybody older than 78.7 is superannuated! <vbg>

I can't remember when your birthday is, so I'm not sure whether you
are old or superannuated. If you're not superannuated yet, you will be
soon. I'm still old, but in three years I'll catch up with you and
also be superannuated (if I'm still alive). <g>
 
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M

Mike Barnes

Steve Hayes said:
The point about a modem, in the literal sense, is that it turns the 1s and 0s
of a digital signal into audible tones, sends them down the line, and they are
converted back into 1s and 0s at the other end.

An ADSL router does not.
I don't agree with that. AIUI an ADSL modem (which is a component of an
ADSL router) turns the 1s and 0s of a digital signal into inaudible
analog carrier signals, sends them down the line, and they are converted
back into 1s and 0s at the other end.

To my mind the fact that the signals are inaudible doesn't disqualify
the device from being regarded as a "modem".
 
K

Ken Blake

Well, I'm 78.7 exactly ( I presume the .7 refers to months ?
No, it's seven tenths of a year--8.4 months.
If it's actually a decimal statistic, I'm only 78.58 !

So, like me, you're old, not superannuated (not yet).
 
K

Ken Blake

Hi, Ken.

Looks like I'll Superannuate (That's like Graduate - and the spell checker
didn't barf at that word) next March - just about the start of next Spring.
;<)

My CPA partner and I were looking at IRS expected-life tables many years
ago. We noted that at age 10, we could have expected to live 68.4 more
years - to 78.4. If we made it to 30, we could expect 49.2 more years,
giving us to 79.2. If we got to 60, we could expect 22.4 more, to 82.4.
"Wow!", Don said, "The older you get, the older you get!"

Now I'm looking at the table that says if I make it to 80, I can expect 7.8
more years after that, so I'm going to stop worrying for a while. ;<)

So just keep living and you'll be superannuated, too, before you know it.
;<}

I know, I know. <g>
 
B

Bob Henson

R. C. White said:
Hi, Ken.



We called it "mouse-ears". ;<)

If you saw it, you wouldn't ask why.
I had one of those in my pharmacy to do the stock ordering - it was
considered very posh in those days. It ran at the impressive speed of 300
baud :) It looked quite, but not exactly, like this one.

http://bit.ly/1a48I4F
 
K

Ken Blake

welcome to the club! I'm also 78 and started with PC's
with the first TRS80 (before floppy disks were invented!)

You guys are even older than *me*. <g>

The TRS80 started in 1977, but floppies (originally 8") started
earlier. They were developed in the late 1960s, and became
commercially available in 1971 (see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diskettes). I remember when they first
started out, on the IBM 370 mainframe.

My first PC wasn't until 1985 or so, but I started with computers in
1962, as a programmer on an IBM 1401.
 
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J

Juan Wei

Ken Blake has written on 9/3/2013 10:56 AM:
The US life expectancy is now 78.7 years. I divide that into three
equal categories:

0- 26.2 years Young
26.2 - 52.4 years Middle-aged
52.4 - 78.7 years Old

Everybody older than 78.7 is superannuated! <vbg>
Oh-oh! I'm 78.9.
 
M

meerkat

Ken Blake said:
You guys are even older than *me*. <g>

The TRS80 started in 1977, but floppies (originally 8") started
earlier. They were developed in the late 1960s, and became
commercially available in 1971 (see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diskettes). I remember when they first
started out, on the IBM 370 mainframe.

My first PC wasn't until 1985 or so, but I started with computers in
1962, as a programmer on an IBM 1401.
I want to join your superannuated club Ken, I was 81 back in January .
As least i qualify as the oldest meerkat %> }.
best wishes to all of us,
 
C

Char Jackson

The US life expectancy is now 78.7 years. I divide that into three
equal categories:

0- 26.2 years Young
26.2 - 52.4 years Middle-aged
52.4 - 78.7 years Old

Everybody older than 78.7 is superannuated! <vbg>

I can't remember when your birthday is, so I'm not sure whether you
are old or superannuated. If you're not superannuated yet, you will be
soon. I'm still old, but in three years I'll catch up with you and
also be superannuated (if I'm still alive). <g>

By convention, we don't stop aging unless we die, so for you to say "in
three years I'll catch up with" R. C. are you implying that he's going to
die soon, and thus stop aging, allowing you to catch up? Ouch. ;-)
 
C

Char Jackson

Almost nothing that is today called a modem is actually a modem. The
term "modem" is short for "modulator-demodulator." Technically, it's a
device that converts the analog signal on the telephone line to the
digital signal needed by a computer, and vice-versa. Technically, any
device that doesn't do that analog to digital conversion is not a
modem.

A device that connects to a high-speed internet connection is properly
called a "gateway," not a modem, because that high-speed internet
connection is digital to begin with. So there's no analog to digital
conversion, no modulating or demodulating is required, and the term
"modem" is technically inappropriate.
I would reserve "gateway" for a router device. I wouldn't refer to a cable
modem or DSL modem as a gateway. They are much closer to being bridges,
(especially the cable modem), than being gateways.
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, Bob.

Yep!

The one I used looked more like the Radio Shack model in your link - the
beige one next to the red phone - but mine was typical Radio Shack black and
silver. And the cups really did look like Mickey Mouse ears. ;<)

RC


"Bob Henson" wrote in message

R. C. White said:
Hi, Ken.



We called it "mouse-ears". ;<)

If you saw it, you wouldn't ask why.
I had one of those in my pharmacy to do the stock ordering - it was
considered very posh in those days. It ran at the impressive speed of 300
baud :) It looked quite, but not exactly, like this one.

http://bit.ly/1a48I4F
 
P

Paul

Mike said:
I don't agree with that. AIUI an ADSL modem (which is a component of an
ADSL router) turns the 1s and 0s of a digital signal into inaudible
analog carrier signals, sends them down the line, and they are converted
back into 1s and 0s at the other end.

To my mind the fact that the signals are inaudible doesn't disqualify
the device from being regarded as a "modem".
Part of the reason they're inaudible, is because there is a
filter included with your ADSL modem kit. It's for splitterless
installations, and helps prevent aliasing from one device into
the other.

And I thought this picture captured the "tones" part of this
perfectly well. Didn't anyone look at this ?

http://home.earthlink.net/~mark.wagnon/dmt.jpe

Notice how the low end slopes off, before crashing into
the POTS passband.

The ADSL modem itself, even keeps statistics on the bins.
This information can be presented to your ISP, to ask
for a profile adjustment. I can't extract this now from
my ADSL modem, because I'm running bridged mode.

http://img.mhilfe.de/dmt6.png

Paul
 
K

Ken Blake

By convention, we don't stop aging unless we die, so for you to say "in
three years I'll catch up with" R. C. are you implying that he's going to
die soon, and thus stop aging, allowing you to catch up? Ouch. ;-)

No. I'm saying that I'll catch up in categories. In three years we
will be in the same category.
 
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K

Ken Blake

I want to join your superannuated club Ken, I was 81 back in January .
As least i qualify as the oldest meerkat %> }.

Welcome to the club! You my be the oldest of us old farts here.
 

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