what is the difference between x64 and x86


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V

VanguardLH

PRATIK said:
what is the difference between x64 and x86?
And we're supposed to believe you've never heard of Google. Uh huh.
Read the classbook your teacher assigned to you.
 
B

Brian Cryer

PRATIK said:
what is the difference between x64 and x86?
x86 refers to the 32 bit architecture/instruction-set from Intel.
x64 refers to the compatible 64 bit architecture, I think this might have
originated from AMD but I'm not sure.
In both cases other manufactures make compatible devices so the originating
manufacturer doesn't matter.
This article might help: http://everything.explained.at/X86_architecture/
although it focuses more on x86 and less on x64.

The key thing if you are downloading software is that x86 refers to 32 bit,
and x64 to 64 bit.
If your PC is less than 5(ish) years old then its hardware is probably 64
bit, but it might be running a 32 bit operating system in which case if
given a choise when downloading software you should go for the x86 version.
If your are running a 64 bit operating system then go for the x64 version if
one exists, but you might (depending on what it is) still be able to run
with the 32 bit (x86) version.

Hope this helps.
 
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B

Brian Matthews

That link is neat<vbg> How do you get it to do that?

Wow, you're not kidding. I've seen people send links to a Google page,
but never anything like this. I would love to know how to do that!
Maybe I'll Google it? : )
 
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G

GreyCloud

x86 refers to the 32 bit architecture/instruction-set from Intel.
x64 refers to the compatible 64 bit architecture, I think this might
have originated from AMD but I'm not sure.
Yes. AMD developed the first 64-bit intel style cpu. This forced
Intels hand to also develope along AMDs decisions... they didn't like
to do that. It was the same thing that caught MS off guard when
Netscape brought out the web browser for win 3.1 and the internet TCP/IP
protocols for win 3.1. Same thing happened to Intel.
 
R

richard

x86 refers to the 32 bit architecture/instruction-set from Intel.
x64 refers to the compatible 64 bit architecture, I think this might have
originated from AMD but I'm not sure.
In both cases other manufactures make compatible devices so the originating
manufacturer doesn't matter.
This article might help: http://everything.explained.at/X86_architecture/
although it focuses more on x86 and less on x64.

The key thing if you are downloading software is that x86 refers to 32 bit,
and x64 to 64 bit.
If your PC is less than 5(ish) years old then its hardware is probably 64
bit, but it might be running a 32 bit operating system in which case if
given a choise when downloading software you should go for the x86 version.
If your are running a 64 bit operating system then go for the x64 version if
one exists, but you might (depending on what it is) still be able to run
with the 32 bit (x86) version.

Hope this helps.
Not exactly correct. The first home computers had what IBM called a 386.
Then went to a 486.
I remember seeing an old show from the 80's where the line was, "A 686?
Hell, the 486 was just put on the market and you've got a 686? What
happened to the 586?"
Then pentium was introduced. As a response to the more powerful AMD.


Beginning with the 80386 chip in 1978, which was a 16 bit one, IBM then
began advancing the chips towards 32 bit.

Quite frankly, Microsoft's use of x86 and x64 is a nostalgic misgnomer.
Where x86 technically refers to the chip, MS is referring to the 32 bit
stuff, whic is wrong because in the case of windows, it is the operating
system software that is either 32 or 64 bit which has nothing to do with
the chip hardware.
 
T

Tim Slattery

Not exactly correct. The first home computers had what IBM called a 386.
Then went to a 486.
I remember seeing an old show from the 80's where the line was, "A 686?
Hell, the 486 was just put on the market and you've got a 686? What
happened to the 586?"
Then pentium was introduced. As a response to the more powerful AMD.
Intel invented the name "Pentium" when a court ruled that they
couldn't trademark numeric designations, like 8086, 80286, 880386,
80486. They wanted to be able to claim to make something that AMD
didn't make. So we had "Pentiums" instead of 586's.
Beginning with the 80386 chip in 1978, which was a 16 bit one, IBM then
began advancing the chips towards 32 bit.
Intel made the chips, not IBM. And the 80386 was a 32-bit chip. There
was an 80386SX that was a 32-bit processor that used a 16-bit bus to
communicate with the rest of the computer.
 
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K

Ken Blake

Not exactly correct. The first home computers had what IBM called a 386.

Well, if you are focusing on being correct, that's not at all correct.
The first home computers using Intel CPUs had an 8088 chip as their
processor. The next generation was 80286. The 80386 wasn't until the
third generation (and I've left out the 8086 and the 80186, since they
were generally used only in specialty machines).


Then went to a 486.
I remember seeing an old show from the 80's where the line was, "A 686?
Hell, the 486 was just put on the market and you've got a 686? What
happened to the 586?"
Then pentium was introduced. As a response to the more powerful AMD.


Beginning with the 80386 chip in 1978, which was a 16 bit one,

No, it was a 32-bit chip.
 
C

Char Jackson

Not exactly correct. The first home computers had what IBM called a 386.
<snip>

Seems like you're overlooking a whole lot of fun hardware that came
before the 386. Notably, the 8086 & 8088, the 6502 & 6510, the
Motorola 680x0 series, and the list goes on.
 
T

Tom Lake

"PRATIK" wrote in message
what is the difference between x64 and x86?


x86 -x64 = x22
 
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R

relic

Brian Matthews said:
Wow, you're not kidding. I've seen people send links to a Google page,
but never anything like this. I would love to know how to do that!
Maybe I'll Google it? : )
You've never seen it? I've been posting that link since January... you must
have me blocked.
 

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