VoIP vs Landline


J

Juan Wei

Ken Blake has written on 4/20/2013 5:09 PM:
For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."
xxxxxxx = other, as in "call me on my other phone".
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

you could also use either "home" or "office" phone.
Now that I've remembered to look at my card, I see that I agree with you
and with ...winston: my phone numbers are labeled Home and Cell :)

I agree that could also use, as desired, Office or Work, and Mobile
instead of Cell. Maybe even Wireless.

I'd say don't use Cordless - that seems to be short for a wireless
landline ;-)
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Now that I've remembered to look at my card
I meant my business card - or my "business" card, since it is actually
social or personal.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Ken Blake has written on 4/20/2013 5:09 PM:

xxxxxxx = other, as in "call me on my other phone".
No, my *other* phone is my *cell* phone.

GD&R
 
K

Ken Blake

I suggest landline. If anyone complains or is confused, tell them your
landline phone is VoIP.

Exactly! And nobody will complain or get confused, because they won't
know it's VoIP, nor would they care.

OTOH, I don't play guitar.
I've been playing for about 65 years now. After all these years, you'd
think I should be better at it than I am.
 
K

Ken Blake

I would say 'You can call me on my cell phone <number> or home phone
<number>.

"Home phone" is a good alternative, and I might sometimes say that
instead of "land line" if I think of it.
 
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K

Ken Blake

Now that I've remembered to look at my card, I see that I agree with you
and with ...winston: my phone numbers are labeled Home and Cell :)

I just looked at my card, and remembered that I have only one number
on--my Home number. I don't put my Cell phone number on it because
there are very few people who I want to know my Cell phone number. I
use my cell phone only for emergencies, and for my wife to call me if
I'm not home and she needs me for something.

But if I had both numbers on my card, I would do the same thing you
do. I wouldn't call it "land line" on a card.
 
K

Ken Blake

Ken Blake has written on 4/20/2013 5:09 PM:

xxxxxxx = other, as in "call me on my other phone".

Yes, thanks; that would work too, although I think I prefer the "home
phone" suggestion.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I've been playing for about 65 years now. After all these years, you'd
think I should be better at it than I am.
Not if I extrapolate from *my* ability to play music...

I used to play recorder (flageolet or fipple flute). I never rose above
mediocre. Maybe I never even reached mediocre :)
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Yes, thanks; that would work too, although I think I prefer the "home
phone" suggestion.
However, it gets confusing if you try to follow the advice "Call me if
you get work". Which number????

Is (or was) that Garrison Keillor's sign off, or am I confused?

Actually, I'm beginning to think it was Bob and Ray, and I think the
correct quote is "Call if you get work".
 
R

Roger Mills

Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
I don't think there *is* a term, in the way you describe.

As I see it, there are three basic ways of making phone calls:

a) Using a telephone connected to a physical land-line (which connects
to a telephone exchange). This includes DECT phones connected wirelessly
to a base plugged into a land-line.

b) Using a cell-phone, connected wirelessly to a mobile phone network

c) Using an internet phone. This includes VoIP and Skype etc. and
requires an internet connection and suitable equipment to enable a phone
to make use of that connection. It may use a special handset, or it may
use the same sort of handset as is used on a fixed line connection, but
connected via an ATA (see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analog_telephone_adapter). Incidentally,
the internet connection used by an internet phone could well be provided
by a cellphone network rather than by a land-line.
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
 
K

Ken Blake

Not if I extrapolate from *my* ability to play music...

I used to play recorder

Me too. I still do, but rarely these days.

I still own a sopranino, two sopranos, two altos, a tenor, a bass, and
a great bass.

I also play banjo (clawhammer style) and a little bit of mandolin and
dulcimer.
 
K

Ken Blake

However, it gets confusing if you try to follow the advice "Call me if
you get work". Which number????

Is (or was) that Garrison Keillor's sign off, or am I confused?

Actually, I'm beginning to think it was Bob and Ray, and I think the
correct quote is "Call if you get work".

It was Bob and Ray, and the correct quotation is "*Write* if you get
work." I'm a big Bob and Ray fan, and I own a couple of books
containing some of their skits. The dust jacket on one of them
contains the words "Write if you get work."
 
B

Buffalo

"Ken Blake" wrote in message
Yes, a good alternative,as I just said to Winston.


I haven't had an office phone in 20 years now. <g>
Well, how long has it been since you had an office? 20 yrs? :)
Buffalo
PS: I agree with the 'Home Phone' word. :D
 
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K

Ken Blake

As I see it, there are three basic ways of making phone calls:

a) Using a telephone connected to a physical land-line (which connects
to a telephone exchange). This includes DECT phones connected wirelessly
to a base plugged into a land-line.

b) Using a cell-phone, connected wirelessly to a mobile phone network

c) Using an internet phone. This includes VoIP and Skype etc. and
requires an internet connection and suitable equipment to enable a phone
to make use of that connection.

Yes, of course. I, and everyone else in this thread, understand that.

However my starting point was that, leaving aside the technical
differences between your a and c, they are identical. If you were to
come into my house, and pick up the phone to make a call, you wouldn't
be able to tell whether it was a or c. You could certainly tell if it
were b.

That was how this all began. Because a and c were the same to the
person using it, I wanted both to have the same name and I called them
both "land line." I was corrected, but the correction refers to the
technical differences, not to what the user experiences.
 
S

Sam Hill

Ken said:
"Don't call me on my cell phone, call me on my non-cell phone."
Don't call me on my cell phone, call me on my home phone.

Eh? It's what I say in a circumstance like that, as do my friends who
have both. ;-)
 
K

Ken Blake

"Ken Blake" wrote in message


Well, how long has it been since you had an office? 20 yrs? :)

Yes.


PS: I agree with the 'Home Phone' word. :D
Me too.
 
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K

Ken Blake

Don't call me on my cell phone, call me on my home phone.

Eh? It's what I say in a circumstance like that, as do my friends who
have both. ;-)

As others have suggested, that's a good way to say it. And to tell the
truth, I probably say it that way as often as I say "Don't call me on
my cell phone, call me on my land line."
 

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