VoIP vs Landline


K

Ken Blake

Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Buffalo

"Ken Blake" wrote in message
Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?

I suppose the term 'land-lines' could be confusing, but I would think the
term 'telepnones' would suffice.
Overall, I don't think its that important.
Thanks for your info on using an almost free phone system.
Buffalo :)
 
R

richard

Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
IMO, landline simply means any telelphony communication which uses a cable,
of any type.
 
S

Stephen Wolstenholme

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
Fixed!

Steve
 
S

sticks

IMO, landline simply means any telelphony communication which uses a cable,
of any type.
I agree. If you check out the urban dictionary, landline is what most
people call something that plugs into their phone jacks. Yeah POTS is
different from what people in the industry know VoIP as, but I don't
think they own the exclusive right to the term landline. Using VoIP
ends up connecting to your internet provider, but you still plug your
phone into a wall jack. This is what most of us would refer to as a
landline in common conversation. If asked whether we use POTS or VoIP,
you can always get more specific.
 
S

Sam Hill

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds of
plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
"Non-cellular phones."
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

Ken Blake

I agree. If you check out the urban dictionary, landline is what most
people call something that plugs into their phone jacks. Yeah POTS is
different from what people in the industry know VoIP as, but I don't
think they own the exclusive right to the term landline. Using VoIP
ends up connecting to your internet provider, but you still plug your
phone into a wall jack. This is what most of us would refer to as a
landline in common conversation.
That was what I had said earlier, and what I was disagreed with about.
And its also the only name I can think of for non-cellular phones. But
looking into definitions on the internet, I was apparently wrong (as I
said above).
 
K

Ken Blake

"Non-cellular phones."

Ugh! A back-formation. I hate back-formations like that; for example I
never say things like "acoustic guitar."
 
P

Paul

Ken said:
Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
The two _separate_ terms, exist for a reason.

If you say "VOIP" to me, it implies a transport of unknown origin,
with an IP layer carrying digital voice samples. VOIP can work
over broadband of some sort. It might even work over dialup,
assuming compression works well enough to do the job (otherwise,
a dialup connection wouldn't have sufficient bandwidth to do
the job). So if you say VOIP, I end up asking you for details
of the transport method.

A landline is baseband communications. The signal is analog,
and carried between 300Hz and 3.4KHz (passband). VOIP is not
the same thing. VOIP is not even a perfect "clear channel",
as attempting to FAX over VOIP, using a FAX modem, won't
work until you drop the FAX transmission rate below 14400.

The two terms cannot be mixed. Say "VOIP", if you mean
an unreliable digital means of emulating voice telephony
service. Say "landline", if you're referring to that
piece of copper running back to the Central Office, the
one that works between baseband 300Hz and 3.4KHz.

The landline, can have many signal types imposed on it.

1) 300 - 3400Hz analog conversation.
2) Low frequency ringer signal, high voltage (you'll get a shock!).
Never grab the wires on a phone line, when the telephone is about
to ring.
3) Minus 48 volts, to make traditional phones work.
4) ADSL signals, carried above 3400Hz, and separated
with things like the filters that come with your ADSL modem.

When a landline is used purely for ADSL, and no voice service
is wanted, that's called a "dry loop".

Paul
 
W

...winston

"Ken Blake" wrote in message
Ugh! A back-formation. I hate back-formations like that; for example I
never say things like "acoustic guitar."
I do. If I'm playing a Martin 000-28 or a Guild D-50 I'd refer to them as an acoustic guitar if differentiating from my other
'electric guitars'.

e.g. http://elderly.com/list/acoustic_guitars/newitems


-- --
....winston
msft mvp consumer apps
 
S

Sam Hill

Ken said:
Ugh! A back-formation. I hate back-formations like that; for example I
never say things like "acoustic guitar."
So how do you differentiate between an acoustic guitar and an electric
guitar?

Me to clerk: "I want to buy a guitar."

Clerk: "Acoustic or electric?"

Ken: "Guitar." :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

Ken Blake

"Ken Blake" wrote in message

I do. If I'm playing a Martin 000-28 or a Guild D-50 I'd refer to them as an acoustic guitar if differentiating from my other
'electric guitars'.

I know; most people do the same sort of thing. I don't.

I play a Martin D-35.

To me, there are two kinds of such instruments: guitars and electric
guitars.
 
K

Ken Blake

So how do you differentiate between an acoustic guitar and an electric
guitar?

Guitar and electric guitar.

Me to clerk: "I want to buy a guitar."

Clerk: "Acoustic or electric?"

Ken: "Guitar." :)

Exactly right! <g> I never want an electric guitar.
 
S

Stan Brown

Having called VoIP a kind of landline, I was taken to task by a couple
of you here, Doing more research on the way the terms are used, it
appears that I was wrong and you were right. The name "VoIP" is
apparently not used the same way as the same as the term "landline."
See, for example,
http://science.opposingviews.com/difference-between-voip-landline-17888.html

But then I have question: what term can be used to describe all kinds
of plugged-in telephones (landline or VoIP) to distinguish them from
cellular phones?
"Wired phones"? "Non-cell phones"?

But do you actually need a term? I'm trying to think what context
might need to distinguish VoIP and landline on the one hand, and cell
phones on the other.
 
K

Ken Blake

"Wired phones"? "Non-cell phones"?

But do you actually need a term? I'm trying to think what context
might need to distinguish VoIP and landline on the one hand, and cell
phones on the other.

For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."

I wouldn't want to use "VoIP" for "xxxxxxx"; it would be overly
precise, and besides, the great majority of people would have no idea
what I was talking about.

I would normally say "landline," and now even after I've been
persuaded that what I have is technically not a landline, I will
continue to say that unless someone has a better suggestion for me.

Two of the suggestions I've gotten here are poor, as far as I'm
concerned. I wouldn't say My cell phone number is 123-456-7890 and my
fixed number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call me on my cell phone,
call me on my non-cell phone." They both sound silly to my ear, and I
think would sound equally silly to almost anyone I said them to.
 
W

...winston

Ken said:
I know; most people do the same sort of thing. I don't.

I play a Martin D-35.

To me, there are two kinds of such instruments: guitars and electric
guitars.
That's acceptable...though many (including me) would even differentiate
further when referencing guitar (your preference) or acoustic guitar (my
preference)- steel-string or classical <g>...also in the electric
category (hollow-body or solid body).

Now if one was playing or discussing an arch-top - it could be either an
acoustic or electric.

What's certain, unless you're extremely dextrous and talented, one only
plays a single guitar (of any type) at a time. :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul

Ken said:
For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."

I wouldn't want to use "VoIP" for "xxxxxxx"; it would be overly
precise, and besides, the great majority of people would have no idea
what I was talking about.

I would normally say "landline," and now even after I've been
persuaded that what I have is technically not a landline, I will
continue to say that unless someone has a better suggestion for me.

Two of the suggestions I've gotten here are poor, as far as I'm
concerned. I wouldn't say My cell phone number is 123-456-7890 and my
fixed number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call me on my cell phone,
call me on my non-cell phone." They both sound silly to my ear, and I
think would sound equally silly to almost anyone I said them to.
I would use

cell phone number
telephone number (i.e. for a POTS line - it's what we "used to say")
VOIP number

When you mention your VOIP number, I then realize it is not
as reliable as your phone number. The VOIP only works, if
the broadband internet transport layer is running. (And my
ADSL goes down from time to time, like every time there
is a lightning storm in the city. Don't do VOIP calls
with me, it lightning is forecast :) It seems portions
of that equipment, are rebooting.)

*******

All three types are integrated with the regular telephone network.

It is possible to do point to point VOIP, without CCS7 or other
call setup mechanism. And you should be able to do that for
free. It's when you bridge to the existing telephone network,
use its directory information (telephone number), that you
have to pay for that access somehow.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CCS7

VOIP consists of a set of protocols for call setup (equivalent to CCS7).
The transport layer is separate, and uses a different set of port
numbers. And it's that transport layer, that you could use like
you might use FTP, where you could "talk" to someone else without
any charges.

So if all my family members had static IP addresses, I might
write a program that allows us to talk for free. Up to the limits
of the bandwidth needed for the conversation. (This is equivalent
to doing a Skype to Skype call - as long as the call doesn't
"escape" from its digital transport domain, it is effectively
free. If the Phone Company gets a whiff, it costs money.)

Paul
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."

I wouldn't want to use "VoIP" for "xxxxxxx"; it would be overly
precise, and besides, the great majority of people would have no idea
what I was talking about.

I would normally say "landline," and now even after I've been
persuaded that what I have is technically not a landline, I will
continue to say that unless someone has a better suggestion for me.

Two of the suggestions I've gotten here are poor, as far as I'm
concerned. I wouldn't say My cell phone number is 123-456-7890 and my
fixed number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call me on my cell phone,
call me on my non-cell phone." They both sound silly to my ear, and I
think would sound equally silly to almost anyone I said them to.
I suggest landline. If anyone complains or is confused, tell them your
landline phone is VoIP.

OTOH, I don't play guitar.
 
W

...winston

Ken said:
For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."

I wouldn't want to use "VoIP" for "xxxxxxx"; it would be overly
precise, and besides, the great majority of people would have no idea
what I was talking about.

I would normally say "landline," and now even after I've been
persuaded that what I have is technically not a landline, I will
continue to say that unless someone has a better suggestion for me.

Two of the suggestions I've gotten here are poor, as far as I'm
concerned. I wouldn't say My cell phone number is 123-456-7890 and my
fixed number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call me on my cell phone,
call me on my non-cell phone." They both sound silly to my ear, and I
think would sound equally silly to almost anyone I said them to.
I would say 'You can call me on my cell phone <number> or home phone
<number>.
 
Ad

Advertisements

S

sticks

For example, if I were to say to say to someone, "My cell phone number
is 123-456-7890 and my xxxxxxx number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call
me on my cell phone, call me on my xxxxxxx phone."

I wouldn't want to use "VoIP" for "xxxxxxx"; it would be overly
precise, and besides, the great majority of people would have no idea
what I was talking about.

I would normally say "landline," and now even after I've been
persuaded that what I have is technically not a landline, I will
continue to say that unless someone has a better suggestion for me.

Two of the suggestions I've gotten here are poor, as far as I'm
concerned. I wouldn't say My cell phone number is 123-456-7890 and my
fixed number is "234-567-8901" or "Don't call me on my cell phone,
call me on my non-cell phone." They both sound silly to my ear, and I
think would sound equally silly to almost anyone I said them to.
you could also use either "home" or "office" phone.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads


Top