Vanished directory


S

Steve Hayes

Today I tried to run a DOS program (XyWrite) and got an error message --
invalid directory for PIF file.

I checked the path, and the C:\XY directory had vanished from the path.

I put it back, tried again. Got the same error.

I then checked and found that the entire directory had vanished, poof, without
a trace.

Has anyone else had anything likie this happen in Windows 7 (Home Premium)?

The antivirus software (Avast) seems to be working, and has not reported any
viruses, but it seems odd that both the directory and the path reference
should vanish, so I suspect that some rogue program has removed them.
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Today I tried to run a DOS program (XyWrite) and got an error message --
invalid directory for PIF file.

I checked the path, and the C:\XY directory had vanished from the path.

I put it back, tried again. Got the same error.

I then checked and found that the entire directory had vanished, poof, without
a trace.

Has anyone else had anything likie this happen in Windows 7 (Home Premium)?

The antivirus software (Avast) seems to be working, and has not reported any
viruses, but it seems odd that both the directory and the path reference
should vanish, so I suspect that some rogue program has removed them.
If just the directory had vanished, then I'd tend to think it might be
some accidental move caused by mouse slip or something like that. But
that wouldn't account for the path having changed in a command.

It sure sounds as if some program has been at work there; and that
program appears to have had the aim of either removing (or tidying up
after a move of) the said directory.

You'd expect a coordinated change like that to have happened from within
the XyWrite suite itself.
Has there been a recent update?

Try the discussion group;
http://www.freelists.org/webpage/xywrite
There's an archive of past messages and an email address for the chap
who maintains it.

Ed
 
S

Steve Hayes

If just the directory had vanished, then I'd tend to think it might be
some accidental move caused by mouse slip or something like that. But
that wouldn't account for the path having changed in a command.
Yes, that's what I thought, though I'd expect some kind of "Do you really want
to do this" warning before removing an entire directory and all the files in
it.
It sure sounds as if some program has been at work there; and that
program appears to have had the aim of either removing (or tidying up
after a move of) the said directory.

You'd expect a coordinated change like that to have happened from within
the XyWrite suite itself.
Has there been a recent update?
Since it's a DOS program (word processor/text editor), it doesn't have
anything like that. What is in the directory is the program file (editor.exe)
and various configuration files for setting up keyboards, date formats etc.

I was able to copy the entire directory over from my desktop computer and put
the directory in the path again, but I just wondered why it had disappeared
like that. I want it in the path so that when I click on the desktop shortcut
(or type "editor" on the command line), it loads the program and its
configuration files.

But what worries me is that if one directory can disappear like that, others
might as well.
 
E

Ed Cryer

Yes, that's what I thought, though I'd expect some kind of "Do you really want
to do this" warning before removing an entire directory and all the files in
it.


Since it's a DOS program (word processor/text editor), it doesn't have
anything like that. What is in the directory is the program file (editor.exe)
and various configuration files for setting up keyboards, date formats etc.

I was able to copy the entire directory over from my desktop computer and put
the directory in the path again, but I just wondered why it had disappeared
like that. I want it in the path so that when I click on the desktop shortcut
(or type "editor" on the command line), it loads the program and its
configuration files.

But what worries me is that if one directory can disappear like that, others
might as well.
This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in
other ones, without any confirmation dialogue appearing. I've then had
to go looking for the missing folder; easy enough to do if you remember
the name or that of a unique file in it.
It is especially easy with items in the Start menu. Just hit left
button, swipe across the menu and release at random.

Ed
 
S

Steve Hayes

This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in
other ones, without any confirmation dialogue appearing. I've then had
to go looking for the missing folder; easy enough to do if you remember
the name or that of a unique file in it.
It is especially easy with items in the Start menu. Just hit left
button, swipe across the menu and release at random.
Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.
 
Z

Zaidy036

Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.
If you know the folder's name use Void's Everything or another search
program.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Steve Hayes said:
This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in
[]
Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.
In XP, this is especially the case with the auto-open feature: when I
drag something to the tree in the left pane, Windows "helpfully" expands
the branch I'm moving to - usually just at the moment I let go the mouse
button, with the result that whatever I'm moving drops into a
sub-directory, and I have no idea which one. I'd be surprised if 7
doesn't also have this "helpful" behaviour.

I've asked in XP newsgroups how to kill this helpful behaviour, without
success.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Everyone has always regarded any usage but his own as either barbarous or
pedantic." - Evelyn Waugh, quoted by Lynne Truss in "Eats, shoots & Leaves"
2003
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

If you know the folder's name use Void's Everything or another search
program.
In addition, if you don't know the folder name but you do know the name
of a file in it, you can search for that file name. Or the extension, if
the folder contains files with unusual file-name extensions...
 
C

Char Jackson

Steve Hayes said:
This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in
[]
Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.
In XP, this is especially the case with the auto-open feature: when I
drag something to the tree in the left pane, Windows "helpfully" expands
the branch I'm moving to - usually just at the moment I let go the mouse
button, with the result that whatever I'm moving drops into a
sub-directory, and I have no idea which one. I'd be surprised if 7
doesn't also have this "helpful" behaviour.

I've asked in XP newsgroups how to kill this helpful behaviour, without
success.
It's very easy to work around this behavior, or to use it to your
advantage. If the folder I want to drop something into is already
visible, I simply do the drag/drop in a single fluid motion, thereby
not allowing the folder tree enough time to expand. If the destination
folder is not visible, I intentionally hover a few ticks to allow the
folder tree to expand before I drop the files. A third scenario is
where I have a minor brain freeze and therefore the risk is higher
that the folder tree will expand on its own, so I simply delay my
movement by a few ticks before I drop the files. Never a problem.
 
Z

Zaidy036

Steve Hayes said:
This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in []
Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.
In XP, this is especially the case with the auto-open feature: when I
drag something to the tree in the left pane, Windows "helpfully" expands
the branch I'm moving to - usually just at the moment I let go the mouse
button, with the result that whatever I'm moving drops into a
sub-directory, and I have no idea which one. I'd be surprised if 7
doesn't also have this "helpful" behaviour.

I've asked in XP newsgroups how to kill this helpful behaviour, without
success.
It's very easy to work around this behavior, or to use it to your
advantage. If the folder I want to drop something into is already
visible, I simply do the drag/drop in a single fluid motion, thereby
not allowing the folder tree enough time to expand. If the destination
folder is not visible, I intentionally hover a few ticks to allow the
folder tree to expand before I drop the files. A third scenario is
where I have a minor brain freeze and therefore the risk is higher
that the folder tree will expand on its own, so I simply delay my
movement by a few ticks before I drop the files. Never a problem.
or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.
 
C

Char Jackson

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
This might seem a silly suggestion, but it's based on something I've
actually done myself by mistake.
Deleting in error should be safeguarded against by a confirm delete
dialogue. But I have moved folders accidentally and dropped them in
[]
Not silly at all - it's an eminently sensible suggestion, and I'll go looking
for it soon. I have indeed moved folders to other folders where I didn't
intend to move them. It's all too easy to do that without noticing.


In XP, this is especially the case with the auto-open feature: when I
drag something to the tree in the left pane, Windows "helpfully" expands
the branch I'm moving to - usually just at the moment I let go the mouse
button, with the result that whatever I'm moving drops into a
sub-directory, and I have no idea which one. I'd be surprised if 7
doesn't also have this "helpful" behaviour.

I've asked in XP newsgroups how to kill this helpful behaviour, without
success.
It's very easy to work around this behavior, or to use it to your
advantage. If the folder I want to drop something into is already
visible, I simply do the drag/drop in a single fluid motion, thereby
not allowing the folder tree enough time to expand. If the destination
folder is not visible, I intentionally hover a few ticks to allow the
folder tree to expand before I drop the files. A third scenario is
where I have a minor brain freeze and therefore the risk is higher
that the folder tree will expand on its own, so I simply delay my
movement by a few ticks before I drop the files. Never a problem.
or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.
I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.
 
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Z

Zaidy036

On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.
I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.
1. Open the destination explorer window.
2. Left click on a file or folder and start dragging it.
3. Instead of going into the open window go around to its top and drop
it on the folder name in the address bar.

If you go into the open folder window and go slowly over a sub-folder
Windows will try to open it and you have to wait at that point to drag
further otherwise that is where what you are dragging will go.
 
C

Char Jackson

On 11/13/2011 9:16 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.
I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.
1. Open the destination explorer window.
2. Left click on a file or folder and start dragging it.
3. Instead of going into the open window go around to its top and drop
it on the folder name in the address bar.

If you go into the open folder window and go slowly over a sub-folder
Windows will try to open it and you have to wait at that point to drag
further otherwise that is where what you are dragging will go.
I read those steps 4 times and I'm completely lost regarding what
you're trying to teach me. :)

I assume step 1 has me opening Windows Explorer and navigating to the
file or folder I want to move. If it's a file it will be listed in the
right-hand window of Win Explorer, and if it's a folder it can be in
either window.

Step 2 deals with selecting the item. I would probably use the left
button because of the context menu that it offers, but that shouldn't
matter for now.

Step 3 talks about an open window...where is this? Is this the
left-hand window in Win Explorer, where the folders are listed? How do
you "go around it"? Do you mean swinging out to the right, into the
right-hand window, but far enough right to avoid the folders listed in
the right-hand window? Lastly, dragging a file or folder to the
address bar doesn't do anything for me because that's not a valid
place to drop those items. I wonder if we're thinking of the same
thing when we say Address bar? Maybe I don't know where that is.

As you know, the auto-expand behavior only happens on folders in the
left-hand window that contain sub-folders, so folders that don't have
sub-folders aren't affected and folders in the right-hand window
aren't affected at all, even if they have sub-folders.

This would take 2 seconds if I could look over your shoulder. Using a
text medium to explain it is the pits. :)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Char Jackson said:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"


It's very easy to work around this behavior, or to use it to your
advantage. If the folder I want to drop something into is already
visible, I simply do the drag/drop in a single fluid motion, thereby
not allowing the folder tree enough time to expand. If the destination
folder is not visible, I intentionally hover a few ticks to allow the
folder tree to expand before I drop the files. A third scenario is
where I have a minor brain freeze and therefore the risk is higher
that the folder tree will expand on its own, so I simply delay my
movement by a few ticks before I drop the files. Never a problem.
You are clearly a very together person; I can't always do the "fluid
motion" fast enough to prevent the expansion, and if I try, it happens
as I describe - i. e. just at the moment I let go, such that I have no
idea where it went.

At least Zaidy036 is confusing you (and, I admit, me)!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Everyone has always regarded any usage but his own as either barbarous or
pedantic." - Evelyn Waugh, quoted by Lynne Truss in "Eats, shoots & Leaves"
2003
 
E

Ed Cryer

You are clearly a very together person; I can't always do the "fluid
motion" fast enough to prevent the expansion, and if I try, it happens
as I describe - i. e. just at the moment I let go, such that I have no
idea where it went.

At least Zaidy036 is confusing you (and, I admit, me)!
I find the easiest way of all to lose a folder is when selecting an item
in the All Programs list. You left-click on what you want to open, your
hand moves a fraction, unclick, and lo! the thing has gone.

Ed
 
Z

Zaidy036

On 11/13/2011 9:16 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.

I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.
1. Open the destination explorer window.
2. Left click on a file or folder and start dragging it.
3. Instead of going into the open window go around to its top and drop
it on the folder name in the address bar.

If you go into the open folder window and go slowly over a sub-folder
Windows will try to open it and you have to wait at that point to drag
further otherwise that is where what you are dragging will go.
I read those steps 4 times and I'm completely lost regarding what
you're trying to teach me. :)

I assume step 1 has me opening Windows Explorer and navigating to the
file or folder I want to move. If it's a file it will be listed in the
right-hand window of Win Explorer, and if it's a folder it can be in
either window.

Step 2 deals with selecting the item. I would probably use the left
button because of the context menu that it offers, but that shouldn't
matter for now.

Step 3 talks about an open window...where is this? Is this the
left-hand window in Win Explorer, where the folders are listed? How do
you "go around it"? Do you mean swinging out to the right, into the
right-hand window, but far enough right to avoid the folders listed in
the right-hand window? Lastly, dragging a file or folder to the
address bar doesn't do anything for me because that's not a valid
place to drop those items. I wonder if we're thinking of the same
thing when we say Address bar? Maybe I don't know where that is.

As you know, the auto-expand behavior only happens on folders in the
left-hand window that contain sub-folders, so folders that don't have
sub-folders aren't affected and folders in the right-hand window
aren't affected at all, even if they have sub-folders.

This would take 2 seconds if I could look over your shoulder. Using a
text medium to explain it is the pits. :)
Sorry for the confusion...I was assuming that the move was from the
desktop to a folder. That is something I frequently do with downloaded
files and folders.
#1. does say "destination"
If you are moving from another folder you must have both the source and
destination open.

"go around" means any way that does not go thru the left hand panel.
 
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C

Char Jackson

You are clearly a very together person; I can't always do the "fluid
motion" fast enough to prevent the expansion, and if I try, it happens
as I describe - i. e. just at the moment I let go, such that I have no
idea where it went.

At least Zaidy036 is confusing you (and, I admit, me)!
I enjoy being confused occasionally. It expands and strengthens the
mind. It makes sure the stretchy bits are still elastic. :)
 
C

Char Jackson

On 11/13/2011 10:22 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On 11/13/2011 9:16 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
<snip>

or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.

I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.

1. Open the destination explorer window.
2. Left click on a file or folder and start dragging it.
3. Instead of going into the open window go around to its top and drop
it on the folder name in the address bar.

If you go into the open folder window and go slowly over a sub-folder
Windows will try to open it and you have to wait at that point to drag
further otherwise that is where what you are dragging will go.
I read those steps 4 times and I'm completely lost regarding what
you're trying to teach me. :)

I assume step 1 has me opening Windows Explorer and navigating to the
file or folder I want to move. If it's a file it will be listed in the
right-hand window of Win Explorer, and if it's a folder it can be in
either window.

Step 2 deals with selecting the item. I would probably use the left
button because of the context menu that it offers, but that shouldn't
matter for now.

Step 3 talks about an open window...where is this? Is this the
left-hand window in Win Explorer, where the folders are listed? How do
you "go around it"? Do you mean swinging out to the right, into the
right-hand window, but far enough right to avoid the folders listed in
the right-hand window? Lastly, dragging a file or folder to the
address bar doesn't do anything for me because that's not a valid
place to drop those items. I wonder if we're thinking of the same
thing when we say Address bar? Maybe I don't know where that is.

As you know, the auto-expand behavior only happens on folders in the
left-hand window that contain sub-folders, so folders that don't have
sub-folders aren't affected and folders in the right-hand window
aren't affected at all, even if they have sub-folders.

This would take 2 seconds if I could look over your shoulder. Using a
text medium to explain it is the pits. :)
Sorry for the confusion...I was assuming that the move was from the
desktop to a folder. That is something I frequently do with downloaded
files and folders.
#1. does say "destination"
If you are moving from another folder you must have both the source and
destination open.

"go around" means any way that does not go thru the left hand panel.
I never store files on the desktop so it didn't immediately occur to
me that that was what you were doing. I'm ok with others storing files
there, (we had a discussion here about that recently), but it's not
something I do.

When I copy or move files, I sometimes have both the source and
destination open simultaneously, but more often I do everything from a
single instance of Win Explorer.

I still don't know how you're getting away with dropping files and
folders on the address bar, but that might be a terminology thing.

Thanks for your patience! There are, indeed, many ways to do things.
 
R

R. C. White

Hi, John.

Did you ever try using the RIGHT button for drag'n'drop?

The default action for the right button is to Move a file. But it offers a
MENU after you release the button, while the left button does not.

That is, right-click on the file/folder you want to move. Hold the button
down while you drag to the destination, and then hover over the destination
until it says "Move to..." (If it is a folder, it should expand, as usual,
when you hover.) The "Copy to..." text should pop up, telling you exactly
which destination is selected; even though it says "copy", that doesn't
happen immediately and you'll still get a chance to change your mind. And
THEN release the button. The Move or Copy action won't happen immediately.
Instead, there will be a short context menu from which you can choose to
Copy here, Move here, Create shortcut here, or Cancel.

This won't insure that you'll never lose another file, but it should prevent
a lot of the accidents. ;<) Try it and let us know how it works for you.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote in message

Char Jackson said:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"


It's very easy to work around this behavior, or to use it to your
advantage. If the folder I want to drop something into is already
visible, I simply do the drag/drop in a single fluid motion, thereby
not allowing the folder tree enough time to expand. If the destination
folder is not visible, I intentionally hover a few ticks to allow the
folder tree to expand before I drop the files. A third scenario is
where I have a minor brain freeze and therefore the risk is higher
that the folder tree will expand on its own, so I simply delay my
movement by a few ticks before I drop the files. Never a problem.
You are clearly a very together person; I can't always do the "fluid
motion" fast enough to prevent the expansion, and if I try, it happens
as I describe - i. e. just at the moment I let go, such that I have no
idea where it went.

At least Zaidy036 is confusing you (and, I admit, me)!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Everyone has always regarded any usage but his own as either barbarous or
pedantic." - Evelyn Waugh, quoted by Lynne Truss in "Eats, shoots & Leaves"
2003
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

On 11/13/2011 10:22 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On 11/13/2011 9:16 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 23:45:42 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"

In message<[email protected]>, Steve Hayes
[]
<snip>

or drag to the folder name in the address bar BUT do not go thru the
open window where another folder might "catch" you.

I'm not sure what you mean. I tried it just now and the folder name in
the address bar wasn't a valid place to drop a file or folder.

1. Open the destination explorer window.
2. Left click on a file or folder and start dragging it.
3. Instead of going into the open window go around to its top and drop
it on the folder name in the address bar.

If you go into the open folder window and go slowly over a sub-folder
Windows will try to open it and you have to wait at that point to drag
further otherwise that is where what you are dragging will go.

I read those steps 4 times and I'm completely lost regarding what
you're trying to teach me. :)

I assume step 1 has me opening Windows Explorer and navigating to the
file or folder I want to move. If it's a file it will be listed in the
right-hand window of Win Explorer, and if it's a folder it can be in
either window.

Step 2 deals with selecting the item. I would probably use the left
button because of the context menu that it offers, but that shouldn't
matter for now.

Step 3 talks about an open window...where is this? Is this the
left-hand window in Win Explorer, where the folders are listed? How do
you "go around it"? Do you mean swinging out to the right, into the
right-hand window, but far enough right to avoid the folders listed in
the right-hand window? Lastly, dragging a file or folder to the
address bar doesn't do anything for me because that's not a valid
place to drop those items. I wonder if we're thinking of the same
thing when we say Address bar? Maybe I don't know where that is.

As you know, the auto-expand behavior only happens on folders in the
left-hand window that contain sub-folders, so folders that don't have
sub-folders aren't affected and folders in the right-hand window
aren't affected at all, even if they have sub-folders.

This would take 2 seconds if I could look over your shoulder. Using a
text medium to explain it is the pits. :)
Sorry for the confusion...I was assuming that the move was from the
desktop to a folder. That is something I frequently do with downloaded
files and folders.
#1. does say "destination"
If you are moving from another folder you must have both the source and
destination open.

"go around" means any way that does not go thru the left hand panel.
I never store files on the desktop so it didn't immediately occur to
me that that was what you were doing. I'm ok with others storing files
there, (we had a discussion here about that recently), but it's not
something I do.

When I copy or move files, I sometimes have both the source and
destination open simultaneously, but more often I do everything from a
single instance of Win Explorer.

I still don't know how you're getting away with dropping files and
folders on the address bar, but that might be a terminology thing.

Thanks for your patience! There are, indeed, many ways to do things.
After reading Zaidy's post, I tried dropping files on the address bar.
It seems to me that it might not drop the file into the directory you
might think you're dropping it into.

Another way for people (I might be one) who are a bit weak on the
buttons and unclick by mistake, is to copy or cut and paste.

By that I mean highlight the file you want to move/copy, choose cut or
copy (from a menu or by Ctrl-x/c), go the destination folder, and click
inside it and paste.

That's handy when you're copying a file to several destinations.

It's been mentioned recently in this NG, I'm just repeating it...
 

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