Sound Recorder


I

Ian Jackson

Don said:
Control Panel
Sound
Recording Tab
Line In/Realtek High Definition Audio = Default Device
Stereo Mix/Realtek High Definition Audio = Ready

Don
I now see the problem with Audacity on a laptop (at least when trying to
record streamed audio - I haven't tried audio into Line In). I've
jiggled around with the Control Panel audio settings, and I can't seem
get Audacity to 'hear' what's coming out of the speakers.

I've quickly installed Stereo Mix Plus, but I'm rather 'non-plussed'
about how to get it recording. It seems to be nagware/trialware, and
would appear to being intending to add a noise to any trial recordings.
So far, all I've been able to record is a clicky sound! I guess it's
RTFM time!
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

I now see the problem with Audacity on a laptop (at least when trying to
record streamed audio - I haven't tried audio into Line In). I've
jiggled around with the Control Panel audio settings, and I can't seem
get Audacity to 'hear' what's coming out of the speakers.

I've quickly installed Stereo Mix Plus, but I'm rather 'non-plussed'
about how to get it recording. It seems to be nagware/trialware, and
would appear to being intending to add a noise to any trial recordings.
So far, all I've been able to record is a clicky sound! I guess it's
RTFM time!
I don't use Audacity very often, and every time I do, I have problems
figuring out how to record and to hear what I'm recording.

So,

1. I can't recall exactly what I did, and therefore can't give concrete
advice.

2. But maybe you can fiddle around and get it to work - which is what I
have to do each time :)

3. You're doubtless right about RTFM time - for both programs.
 
D

Don

I now see the problem with Audacity on a laptop (at least when trying to
record streamed audio - I haven't tried audio into Line In). I've
jiggled around with the Control Panel audio settings, and I can't seem
get Audacity to 'hear' what's coming out of the speakers.

I've quickly installed Stereo Mix Plus, but I'm rather 'non-plussed'
about how to get it recording. It seems to be nagware/trialware, and
would appear to being intending to add a noise to any trial recordings.
So far, all I've been able to record is a clicky sound! I guess it's
RTFM time!
Ian,

As stated in my last post to Ed, I have switched the default recorder to
Stereo Mix, went back to YouTube and again with Audacity recorded the
same songs for comparison as I did yesterday. No problems, got a good
recording on both R & L tracks, nothing garbled. You may need to
re-install Audacity. Just a suggestion, I am no expert.

Don
 
I

Ian Jackson

Gene E. Bloch said:
I don't use Audacity very often, and every time I do, I have problems
figuring out how to record and to hear what I'm recording.

So,

1. I can't recall exactly what I did, and therefore can't give concrete
advice.

2. But maybe you can fiddle around and get it to work - which is what I
have to do each time :)

3. You're doubtless right about RTFM time - for both programs.
After clicking on 'Try', and various other messing around, I eventually
got a recording of sorts - but, for the moment, I can't hear what I'm
recording. I'll continue playing.

As for Audacity (which I've been using for years on my XP PC), I seem to
recall initially having a problem monitoring what I was recording - but
I think that was because I hadn't turned on the right sound
inputs/outputs (I use 'New Mixer'). Eventually, I hit on the right
combination, and had no problems since. That's why I thought it would
have worked OK on my W7 laptop. I note that Audacity's advice about the
problem does seem rather vague.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

After clicking on 'Try', and various other messing around, I eventually
got a recording of sorts - but, for the moment, I can't hear what I'm
recording. I'll continue playing.

As for Audacity (which I've been using for years on my XP PC), I seem to
recall initially having a problem monitoring what I was recording - but
I think that was because I hadn't turned on the right sound
inputs/outputs (I use 'New Mixer'). Eventually, I hit on the right
combination, and had no problems since. That's why I thought it would
have worked OK on my W7 laptop. I note that Audacity's advice about the
problem does seem rather vague.
I hope it's not as vague as mine :)
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <WlUgS8APiBERFwO$@g3ohx.demon.co.uk>, Ian Jackson
I now see the problem with Audacity on a laptop (at least when trying
to record streamed audio - I haven't tried audio into Line In). I've
jiggled around with the Control Panel audio settings, and I can't seem
get Audacity to 'hear' what's coming out of the speakers.
[]
OT from the original part of the thread, but I think you'll find the
main problem with Line In on most laptops/netbooks is that it is
missing; most only have line out/headphone/feed to powered speakers
(green), and microphone input (pink) (even if the laptop/netbook has a
built-in mic., as most do). The mic. input is usually (a) mono [yes, it
uses a stereo plug/socket, but the other channel is used to feed power
out to electret/condenser mic.s, not to do stereo input], (b) too
sensitive. A _few_ do have a genuine line input (blue), but they are the
exception.
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Don said:
Ed,

I had been recording from audio cassette tapes using Line In and it was
still on that default setting when I recorded audio from YouTube with
Audacity and the sound seemed to be fine! I haven't, as yet, tried
setting the default to Stereo Mix, then doing a recording off YouTube
for comparison.

Don
Solved my problem. It was due to using HDMI sound output to my TV
monitor. That doesn't allow stereo mix. I switched to speakers output
and all's hunky-dory. I can record using Audacity as well, and save to
MP3 once I'd pointed it to the lame_enc.dll.

Ed
 
W

Wolf K

On 2/4/2013 6:09 PM, Ed Cryer wrote:
[snip conversation]
Solved my problem. It was due to using HDMI sound output to my TV
monitor. That doesn't allow stereo mix. I switched to speakers output
and all's hunky-dory. I can record using Audacity as well, and save to
MP3 once I'd pointed it to the lame_enc.dll.

Ed
Thanks for solving the problem guys. I've not tried recording, but now I
think I can do it. ;-)
 
E

Ed Cryer

Wolf said:
On 2/4/2013 6:09 PM, Ed Cryer wrote:
[snip conversation]
Solved my problem. It was due to using HDMI sound output to my TV
monitor. That doesn't allow stereo mix. I switched to speakers output
and all's hunky-dory. I can record using Audacity as well, and save to
MP3 once I'd pointed it to the lame_enc.dll.

Ed
Thanks for solving the problem guys. I've not tried recording, but now I
think I can do it. ;-)
After switching to speakers I had to spend some time tinkering with the
settings to remove all kinds of echoes, whizzes and snorts that were
coming out of them. I have the latest Realtek drivers but they have so
many settings and fine tuning that it took ages. I've got them ok now
but I couldn't for the life of me write down just what I changed.

It was fun, though, going through the Equalizer and Environment
settings. The ones I rejected were Colosseum, Sewer Pipe, Stone Room and
Padded Cell. Oh, and in the Recording Properties of Stereo Mix I have
"DC Offset Cancellation" ticked. God alone knows what that is but it
sure makes a difference here.

Ed
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Solved my problem. It was due to using HDMI sound output to my TV
monitor. That doesn't allow stereo mix. I switched to speakers output
and all's hunky-dory. I can record using Audacity as well, and save to
MP3 once I'd pointed it to the lame_enc.dll.

Ed
Thanks for the info. Now here's my question: can you help me remember
the above when it happens to me?

:)
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <ker2jc$u4k$1@dont-email.me>, Ed Cryer
It was fun, though, going through the Equalizer and Environment
settings. The ones I rejected were Colosseum, Sewer Pipe, Stone Room
and Padded Cell. Oh, and in the Recording Properties of Stereo Mix I
(Wasn't there a just plain "flat" or "off" option?)
have "DC Offset Cancellation" ticked. God alone knows what that is but
it sure makes a difference here.
[]
Sound files should have an average value of around zero - the speaker
cones move towards you from their rest position some of the time, and
away from you some of the time. If the sound file has a d. c. offset,
then the speaker is permanently offset away from its rest position. This
means that it has more movement available in one direction than the
other, which _can_ distort the sound (it certainly makes the maximum
movement available less); it also means, even in silence, that current
is flowing in the speaker coils, which can warm them and the amplifier
output stage up. This is assuming you have an amplifier whose response
goes down to DC; if not, a DC offset can still asymmetrically load
whatever it is (usually a capacitor) in the amplifier that blocks DC,
and this can still cause distortion (it shouldn't in a well-designed
one, but it can).
 
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