Saving flash video?


K

Kenny Cargill

I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save Flash
and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with MP4
extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
 
S

Sjouke Burry

I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads
with MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
If your graphics card has a TV out, use that one with a videorecorder.
 
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1

123Jim

I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
Try this: http://camstudio.org/

It will not save the original file but it allows you to record the video.

One tip .. choose maximum quality recording ,, the default setting is
something like 75% which does not make for a quality recording
 
P

Paul

Kenny said:
I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
I don't have Flash in Firefox (as Firefox is my main
surfing browser).

I do have Flash in Seamonkey (same idea as Firefox), and
yes, the flash content does download. I got a total of
around 197MB in my cache folder. (If your cache was
artificially limited to hold some smaller amount of
files, you might want to change the setting first.)

I cleared the cache on the browser, then watched that 24 minute show.

The video downloads as around 368 separate files. Each file
is around 500KB or so. The format is called AdobeHDS. A
marketing monkey describes it here.

http://blog.limelight.com/2012/06/adobe-hds-in-the-limelight/

"The growth of chunked, HTTP streaming
has been getting a lot of press lately"

Inside the _CACHE_001_ file, I can see some details.
The file when probed, claims to be "binary". But if
I run a "strings" program, I can extract text out of it.
Then I can use Notepad or Wordpad to read it.

Cache-Control: max-age=1814400
Expires: Sat, 09 Feb 2013 11:34:44 GMT
Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 19:49:53 GMT
Content-Type: video/f4f
Content-Length: 531445
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2013 16:48:30 GMT
X-Varnish: 2624022829 2621393358
Age: 18827
X-Varnish-Stream: Edge HIT, 6, sqc.rte.ie: MidTier HIT, 3, va1mam.rte.ie: Origin fms1mam

Each file should have an entry like that. I found
368 instances of

Content-Type: video/f4f

in the _CACHE_001_ file. So that's where your
movie went.

Each file individually, is not recognized in GSpot.
File.exe says the file is "data". Each file does
have 4CC codes in it. And from those, we can kinda
guess what the underlying format is. Not that it
helps.

I expect the idea is, you concatenate those files
in strict order, and you get a movie out of it.
Nope, I haven't done that yet. There are likely
smarter ways to do it, than manually.

*******

The file AdobeHDS.php here, is a tool for handling such.

https://github.com/K-S-V/Scripts

How to use it, is partially described here.

http://web.archive.org/web/20120608071914/http://stream-recorder.com/forum/adobe-hds-downloader-t12074.html

I found the reference to it, here.

http://forum.applian.com/showthread.php?8184-Unable-to-capture-video-f4f

I think what you'd probably prefer, is something with
a nice GUI, that can handle all the details for you.
Installing PHP just to run that script, sounds like
a lot of work.

So what you're looking for, is any download tool which
can handle AdobeHDS. AdobeHDS has a number of DRM
options, and I'm guessing in this case, not a lot of
DRM is involved. Otherwise, I probably wouldn't have
been able to see the 4CC codes in the file, if the
thing was encrypted. And if they used an in-memory
technique, they didn't even have to leave all
those files in the cache.

So just research AdobeHDS, and find a better answer
than I did :)

Paul
 
P

pjp

I don't have Flash in Firefox (as Firefox is my main
surfing browser).

I do have Flash in Seamonkey (same idea as Firefox), and
yes, the flash content does download. I got a total of
around 197MB in my cache folder. (If your cache was
artificially limited to hold some smaller amount of
files, you might want to change the setting first.)

I cleared the cache on the browser, then watched that 24 minute show.

The video downloads as around 368 separate files. Each file
is around 500KB or so. The format is called AdobeHDS. A
marketing monkey describes it here.

http://blog.limelight.com/2012/06/adobe-hds-in-the-limelight/

"The growth of chunked, HTTP streaming
has been getting a lot of press lately"

Inside the _CACHE_001_ file, I can see some details.
The file when probed, claims to be "binary". But if
I run a "strings" program, I can extract text out of it.
Then I can use Notepad or Wordpad to read it.

Cache-Control: max-age=1814400
Expires: Sat, 09 Feb 2013 11:34:44 GMT
Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 19:49:53 GMT
Content-Type: video/f4f
Content-Length: 531445
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2013 16:48:30 GMT
X-Varnish: 2624022829 2621393358
Age: 18827
X-Varnish-Stream: Edge HIT, 6, sqc.rte.ie: MidTier HIT, 3, va1mam.rte.ie: Origin fms1mam

Each file should have an entry like that. I found
I've noticed the odd time viewing uTube video and when I can't seem to
get anything else to capture it that using IE the video gets saved
locally in a large tmp file that IE locks so one can't copy it etc. It
also gets deleted when IE terminates.

If I REALLY REALLY want the video I simply physically turn off the power
to the pc just at the end of the video. This leaves the large tmp file
orphaned and one can copy, move and rename it same as any other once pc
has rebooted. I rename it to an swf file and then run it thru Any Video
Converter to change it's format. Has always worked when I've resorted to
this desparate measure :)
 
K

Kenny Cargill

In Firefox temp I have a number of files shown as type mp4Seg1-Frag361 File
(289KB), (number and size varies). I'm assuming these are segments of the
whole file in MP4 format but don't know which are the correct ones or how to
combine into a viewable file.
This is the actual entry for one of them, without all the binary info:

"Cache entry information
key:
http://vod.hds.rasset.ie/hds-vod/2013/0114/adaptive/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260_/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260__512k.mp4Seg1-Frag358
fetch count: 3
last fetched: 2013-01-19 19:44:01
last modified: 2013-01-18 22:11:54
expires: 2013-02-08 21:56:20
Data size: 276769
file on disk:
C:\Users\Kenny\AppData\Local\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\mmgy7oka.default\Cache\5\2B\A1980d01
Security: This document does not have any security info associated with
it.
Client: HTTP
request-method: GET
response-head: HTTP/1.1 200 OK Cache-Control: max-age=1814400 Expires:
Fri, 08 Feb 2013 21:56:44 GMT Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 19:49:38 GMT
Content-Type: video/f4f Content-Length: 276769 Accept-Ranges: bytes Date:
Fri, 18 Jan 2013 22:12:18 GMT X-Varnish: 2101736606 Age: 934
X-Varnish-Stream: Edge MISS, sqb.rte.ie: MidTier HIT, 1,
va1matrix.rasset.ie: Origin fms1mam"

"Paul" wrote in message
Kenny said:
I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
I don't have Flash in Firefox (as Firefox is my main
surfing browser).

I do have Flash in Seamonkey (same idea as Firefox), and
yes, the flash content does download. I got a total of
around 197MB in my cache folder. (If your cache was
artificially limited to hold some smaller amount of
files, you might want to change the setting first.)

I cleared the cache on the browser, then watched that 24 minute show.

The video downloads as around 368 separate files. Each file
is around 500KB or so. The format is called AdobeHDS. A
marketing monkey describes it here.

http://blog.limelight.com/2012/06/adobe-hds-in-the-limelight/

"The growth of chunked, HTTP streaming
has been getting a lot of press lately"

Inside the _CACHE_001_ file, I can see some details.
The file when probed, claims to be "binary". But if
I run a "strings" program, I can extract text out of it.
Then I can use Notepad or Wordpad to read it.

Cache-Control: max-age=1814400
Expires: Sat, 09 Feb 2013 11:34:44 GMT
Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 19:49:53 GMT
Content-Type: video/f4f
Content-Length: 531445
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2013 16:48:30 GMT
X-Varnish: 2624022829 2621393358
Age: 18827
X-Varnish-Stream: Edge HIT, 6, sqc.rte.ie: MidTier HIT, 3,
va1mam.rte.ie: Origin fms1mam

Each file should have an entry like that. I found
368 instances of

Content-Type: video/f4f

in the _CACHE_001_ file. So that's where your
movie went.

Each file individually, is not recognized in GSpot.
File.exe says the file is "data". Each file does
have 4CC codes in it. And from those, we can kinda
guess what the underlying format is. Not that it
helps.

I expect the idea is, you concatenate those files
in strict order, and you get a movie out of it.
Nope, I haven't done that yet. There are likely
smarter ways to do it, than manually.

*******

The file AdobeHDS.php here, is a tool for handling such.

https://github.com/K-S-V/Scripts

How to use it, is partially described here.

http://web.archive.org/web/20120608071914/http://stream-recorder.com/forum/adobe-hds-downloader-t12074.html

I found the reference to it, here.

http://forum.applian.com/showthread.php?8184-Unable-to-capture-video-f4f

I think what you'd probably prefer, is something with
a nice GUI, that can handle all the details for you.
Installing PHP just to run that script, sounds like
a lot of work.

So what you're looking for, is any download tool which
can handle AdobeHDS. AdobeHDS has a number of DRM
options, and I'm guessing in this case, not a lot of
DRM is involved. Otherwise, I probably wouldn't have
been able to see the 4CC codes in the file, if the
thing was encrypted. And if they used an in-memory
technique, they didn't even have to leave all
those files in the cache.

So just research AdobeHDS, and find a better answer
than I did :)

Paul
 
P

Paul

Kenny said:
In Firefox temp I have a number of files shown as type mp4Seg1-Frag361
File (289KB), (number and size varies). I'm assuming these are segments
of the whole file in MP4 format but don't know which are the correct
ones or how to combine into a viewable file.
This is the actual entry for one of them, without all the binary info:

"Cache entry information
key:
http://vod.hds.rasset.ie/hds-vod/2013/0114/adaptive/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260_/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260__512k.mp4Seg1-Frag358

fetch count: 3
last fetched: 2013-01-19 19:44:01
last modified: 2013-01-18 22:11:54
expires: 2013-02-08 21:56:20
Data size: 276769
file on disk:
C:\Users\Kenny\AppData\Local\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\mmgy7oka.default\Cache\5\2B\A1980d01

Security: This document does not have any security info associated
with it.
Client: HTTP
request-method: GET
response-head: HTTP/1.1 200 OK Cache-Control: max-age=1814400
Expires: Fri, 08 Feb 2013 21:56:44 GMT Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013
19:49:38 GMT Content-Type: video/f4f Content-Length: 276769
Accept-Ranges: bytes Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2013 22:12:18 GMT X-Varnish:
2101736606 Age: 934 X-Varnish-Stream: Edge MISS, sqb.rte.ie: MidTier
HIT, 1, va1matrix.rasset.ie: Origin fms1mam"

"Paul" wrote in message
I played around with the files a bit more.

The problem seems to be, the first file in the
collection, doesn't have a header. The "chunks"
all seem to have about the same kind of content.

This implies something coordinates what happens.
I see mention of a "manifest", but couldn't find
anything of that description.

It's looking like you'll need a tool of some
sort to do it. I glued all the files together,
but nothing good happened.

It's really a question of whether there's something
better than that PHP thing.

*******

There are hardware ways to capture a screen.
But the details leave a lot to be desired.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100098

This is the company that started this idea, of making
affordable screen capture. The idea was, they had to
skate pretty close to violating DMCA, and the 1080i60
limitation is part of that. Their first card, one of
the issues was something to do with the compression
choices for the video output. It may have been MJPEG
done on an FPGA. Without that, you need a pretty decent
RAID0 array to keep up with the data rate. (When they
first started, there weren't a lot of good SSDs available.
Now there are some SSDs that could keep up.)

http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity/

Paul
 
K

Kenny Cargill

Thanks for trying, I played around a bit with a screen capture programme but
results weren't good. Have tried various flash saver apps and extensions
with IE, Chrome and Firefox to no avail. Hoping it makes it's way onto You
Tube somehow, then I can save it.


Kenny

"Paul" wrote in message
Kenny said:
In Firefox temp I have a number of files shown as type mp4Seg1-Frag361
File (289KB), (number and size varies). I'm assuming these are segments
of the whole file in MP4 format but don't know which are the correct ones
or how to combine into a viewable file.
This is the actual entry for one of them, without all the binary info:

"Cache entry information
key:
http://vod.hds.rasset.ie/hds-vod/2013/0114/adaptive/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260_/20130114_rteone-nationwide-nationwide_cl10102433_10102437_260__512k.mp4Seg1-Frag358
fetch count: 3
last fetched: 2013-01-19 19:44:01
last modified: 2013-01-18 22:11:54
expires: 2013-02-08 21:56:20
Data size: 276769
file on disk:
C:\Users\Kenny\AppData\Local\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\mmgy7oka.default\Cache\5\2B\A1980d01
Security: This document does not have any security info associated
with it.
Client: HTTP
request-method: GET
response-head: HTTP/1.1 200 OK Cache-Control: max-age=1814400 Expires:
Fri, 08 Feb 2013 21:56:44 GMT Last-Modified: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 19:49:38 GMT
Content-Type: video/f4f Content-Length: 276769 Accept-Ranges: bytes Date:
Fri, 18 Jan 2013 22:12:18 GMT X-Varnish: 2101736606 Age: 934
X-Varnish-Stream: Edge MISS, sqb.rte.ie: MidTier HIT, 1,
va1matrix.rasset.ie: Origin fms1mam"

"Paul" wrote in message
I played around with the files a bit more.

The problem seems to be, the first file in the
collection, doesn't have a header. The "chunks"
all seem to have about the same kind of content.

This implies something coordinates what happens.
I see mention of a "manifest", but couldn't find
anything of that description.

It's looking like you'll need a tool of some
sort to do it. I glued all the files together,
but nothing good happened.

It's really a question of whether there's something
better than that PHP thing.

*******

There are hardware ways to capture a screen.
But the details leave a lot to be desired.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100098

This is the company that started this idea, of making
affordable screen capture. The idea was, they had to
skate pretty close to violating DMCA, and the 1080i60
limitation is part of that. Their first card, one of
the issues was something to do with the compression
choices for the video output. It may have been MJPEG
done on an FPGA. Without that, you need a pretty decent
RAID0 array to keep up with the data rate. (When they
first started, there weren't a lot of good SSDs available.
Now there are some SSDs that could keep up.)

http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity/

Paul
 
D

Desk Rabbit

I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
You or your friends could just contact the TV station and ask for a copy.
 
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V

VanguardLH

Kenny Cargill said:
I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save Flash
and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with MP4
extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.
You're assuming the video stream is encoded using a standard protocol,
like RTMP[E]. Nothing stops a site from delivering a Javascripted
player in the page you load from them or them delivering a Java applet
to use as the player. Their player knows what proprietary format the
site has encoded the video stream. Nothing else will.

If the RTMPE protocol is used, extremely few stream capture programs
will capture it. Despite Adobe documenting RTMPE as a substitute to use
RTMP over an SSL transport and declaring that it is not a DRM scheme,
and that a encrypted token needs to be sent to provide DRM protection,
Adobe has backtracked and now claims RTMPE is for content protection.
That is due mostly to the lazy users of RTMPE who don't want to bother
with generating an SWF security token.

Even commercial video stream capture programs were scared off by Adobe's
threat. Adobe didn't have to take anyone to court. They simply sent a
letter of intent to any software vendor that continue to permit capture
of RTMPE streams. Applian Replay Media Catcher used to capture RTMPE
streams until Adobe sent them a letter of intent. Jaksta continued
capturing RTMPE for awhile until Adobe scared them, too.

http://www.jaksta.com/support/jaksta-for-windows-faq/what-is-rtmpe/
http://www.jaksta.com/support/jaksta-for-windows-faq/what-is-swf-verification/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_Streaming
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/adobe-media-server/articles/swf-verification-protected-http-dynamic-streaming.html

I have yet to find a source using RTMPE that actually implements SWF
verification so technically they are merely encrypting their content and
not protecting it (against copying). Although RTMPE was not supposed to
protect content (after delivery), it became used for that purpose
because of all the lazy or ignorant users that don't both with
implementing SWF verification. This is akin to Firefox not blocking all
non-secure content on an HTTPS site because, gee, it might break a
poorly designed site (and there are lots of them). There was how it was
designed versus how it got used.

For the specially coded Java[script] client delivered to you that
decodes a sites streamed content, you won't find a stream capture
program that will work. For RTMPE, you could try using rtmpdump which
is a command-line program. It's supposed to work for RTMPE but not for
RTMPE+SWFverification (since the latter is protected content). I think
there is some companion URL<something> program you can use to capture
the links on a page that you feed via parameters to the rtmpdump
program. Otherwise, look at using a screen capture program. Not a
screen snapshot program that takes static pictures of what is displayed
on the screen. I'm talking about recording a section of the screen.
These don't rely on any streaming protocol to capture. They just grab
what's shown on the screen. The Video Downloader add-on for Firefox has
this as a beta feature (it uses Camstudio libs which often fails for
snagging the audio so all you get is a silent video). Whatever you see
on the screen is what gets recorded. If there is jitter, hangs, or
pauses in the video then those are also recorded. It is capturing a
specific area of the screen, so if you move the app's window wherein the
video is displayed, you overlap that window with another one, or you
minimize that window then you end up recording something else. The area
being captured doesn't tag along with the moved window or compensate for
the window disappearing or getting overlapped by another window. I
never found Camstudio to be very good and tried using BB Flashback
screen recorder (free) for awhile but eventually gave up on that, too (I
think it was because playback of the recorded screen was jerky, audio
was poor or out of sync, or the stream video became jerky when the
BBFlashback recorder was loaded since the combo resulted in spiking CPU
usage to 100%).

The web browsers could obvious include their own stream capture mode but
they won't because they, too, are afraid of what Adobe would do. The
web browser makers aren't prepared to combat Adobe in court to prove
RTMPE is *not* a copy protection scheme but only provides secure
transport and that SWF verification *must* be used to provide copy
protection. Anyone that wins that battle would immediately force all
those lazy users of RTMPE to start implementing SWF verification. That
won't resolve where a site delivers their own Java[script] player that
understands the encoding used by that site. Since Java[script] is local
code (ran by your client), I suppose you could attempt to reverse
engineer their code and add your own to save the stream; however, all
they'd have to do is slightly change the encoding and your new decoder
and capturer would fail.

The streamed video at the site you mention is EXTREMELY jerky. A screen
recording would be just as crappy.
 
K

Kenny Cargill

I'm afraid most of that went over my head but thanks for taking the time to
explain. Will try Desk Rabbit's suggestion of actually contacting RTE
Television.

Kenny Cargill

"VanguardLH" wrote in message
Kenny Cargill said:
I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash
and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4
extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.
You're assuming the video stream is encoded using a standard protocol,
like RTMP[E]. Nothing stops a site from delivering a Javascripted
player in the page you load from them or them delivering a Java applet
to use as the player. Their player knows what proprietary format the
site has encoded the video stream. Nothing else will.

If the RTMPE protocol is used, extremely few stream capture programs
will capture it. Despite Adobe documenting RTMPE as a substitute to use
RTMP over an SSL transport and declaring that it is not a DRM scheme,
and that a encrypted token needs to be sent to provide DRM protection,
Adobe has backtracked and now claims RTMPE is for content protection.
That is due mostly to the lazy users of RTMPE who don't want to bother
with generating an SWF security token.

Even commercial video stream capture programs were scared off by Adobe's
threat. Adobe didn't have to take anyone to court. They simply sent a
letter of intent to any software vendor that continue to permit capture
of RTMPE streams. Applian Replay Media Catcher used to capture RTMPE
streams until Adobe sent them a letter of intent. Jaksta continued
capturing RTMPE for awhile until Adobe scared them, too.

http://www.jaksta.com/support/jaksta-for-windows-faq/what-is-rtmpe/
http://www.jaksta.com/support/jaksta-for-windows-faq/what-is-swf-verification/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_Streaming
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/adobe-media-server/articles/swf-verification-protected-http-dynamic-streaming.html

I have yet to find a source using RTMPE that actually implements SWF
verification so technically they are merely encrypting their content and
not protecting it (against copying). Although RTMPE was not supposed to
protect content (after delivery), it became used for that purpose
because of all the lazy or ignorant users that don't both with
implementing SWF verification. This is akin to Firefox not blocking all
non-secure content on an HTTPS site because, gee, it might break a
poorly designed site (and there are lots of them). There was how it was
designed versus how it got used.

For the specially coded Java[script] client delivered to you that
decodes a sites streamed content, you won't find a stream capture
program that will work. For RTMPE, you could try using rtmpdump which
is a command-line program. It's supposed to work for RTMPE but not for
RTMPE+SWFverification (since the latter is protected content). I think
there is some companion URL<something> program you can use to capture
the links on a page that you feed via parameters to the rtmpdump
program. Otherwise, look at using a screen capture program. Not a
screen snapshot program that takes static pictures of what is displayed
on the screen. I'm talking about recording a section of the screen.
These don't rely on any streaming protocol to capture. They just grab
what's shown on the screen. The Video Downloader add-on for Firefox has
this as a beta feature (it uses Camstudio libs which often fails for
snagging the audio so all you get is a silent video). Whatever you see
on the screen is what gets recorded. If there is jitter, hangs, or
pauses in the video then those are also recorded. It is capturing a
specific area of the screen, so if you move the app's window wherein the
video is displayed, you overlap that window with another one, or you
minimize that window then you end up recording something else. The area
being captured doesn't tag along with the moved window or compensate for
the window disappearing or getting overlapped by another window. I
never found Camstudio to be very good and tried using BB Flashback
screen recorder (free) for awhile but eventually gave up on that, too (I
think it was because playback of the recorded screen was jerky, audio
was poor or out of sync, or the stream video became jerky when the
BBFlashback recorder was loaded since the combo resulted in spiking CPU
usage to 100%).

The web browsers could obvious include their own stream capture mode but
they won't because they, too, are afraid of what Adobe would do. The
web browser makers aren't prepared to combat Adobe in court to prove
RTMPE is *not* a copy protection scheme but only provides secure
transport and that SWF verification *must* be used to provide copy
protection. Anyone that wins that battle would immediately force all
those lazy users of RTMPE to start implementing SWF verification. That
won't resolve where a site delivers their own Java[script] player that
understands the encoding used by that site. Since Java[script] is local
code (ran by your client), I suppose you could attempt to reverse
engineer their code and add your own to save the stream; however, all
they'd have to do is slightly change the encoding and your new decoder
and capturer would fail.

The streamed video at the site you mention is EXTREMELY jerky. A screen
recording would be just as crappy.
 
P

Paul

Kenny said:
I'm afraid most of that went over my head but thanks for taking the time
to explain. Will try Desk Rabbit's suggestion of actually contacting
RTE Television.

Kenny Cargill
I tried the "php AdobeHDS.php" method, figured out the
manifest URL OK, it started to transfer but stopped
with an error after about 8 segments out of 368.

Paul
 
Y

Yousuf Khan

I am trying to save the TV programme here:
http://www.rte.ie/player/gb/show/10102433/
because a couple of my friends appear in it,
Have tried the Firefox save flash extension, YouTube Downloader, Save
Flash and none will save this.
Tried looking in Firefox temp internet files and i can see the ads with
MP4 extension but not the main part of the programme.
Any suggestions welcome.

Kenny Cargill
Try using web-based site like this:

http://keepvid.com/

Or try some of the other sites listed in here:

http://mashable.com/2007/05/05/download-youtube-video/

Yousuf Khan
 
H

Henry

Try CamStudio. Works on everything I've tried. Google for it. It's free.

Henry
 
P

Paul

Henry said:
Try CamStudio. Works on everything I've tried. Google for it. It's free.

Henry
What kind of frame rate do you get ?

Not the "fake frame rate" in the Preferences.

Going by memory here, I think when I tested that program,
it said "200 FPS" in the preferences. That kinda put a smile
on my face (more of a smirk than a smile).

Then, I did a desktop capture, followed by post-analysis
of the content. I converted the movie gathered, into
individual images. I would find on average, maybe 35 images
in a row, in the "200 FPS movie" contained the same pixel
data. (I detected that, by just running MD5SUM on the
directory full of thousands of pictures, and noting the
MD5SUM of 35 files in a row, had the same value.)

And that means, the "real capture rate" on my puny computer
(E8400 dual core 3GHz) was only 7FPS or so. Some low
number like that. That's too low to snag a copy of a
Flash movie playing on the screen.

For that idea to work, you'd need a much more powerful
computer than I've got. I have no idea what would
make it run faster - whether more cores would help
would depend on whether CamStudio can break the
screen into pieces, and assign a core to each piece.

*******

I'm testing a capture idea in Linux right now,
but it's not going well... not well at all. Took
about four hours of fiddling to build the
stupid thing (package was removed from the
distro I selected, UbuntuStudio), so I had to
build it by hand. And audio capture on the
program is still busted (thank you, PulseAudio!).
Oh, well. You see, the introduction of PulseAudio
in distros of the Ubuntu variety, has just
ruined sound. Half the stuff I try (like
a TV tuner app I used to like), the audio
never got updated to use the new flavor of
audio, and so you get to listen to the sounds
of silence instead. Very nice. I'm sure the
developer of ALSA (which stands for "audio that works")
must cry when he sees what they've done to
Linux audio. All his work down the toilet!

Paul
 
H

Henry

Paul said:
What kind of frame rate do you get ?

Not the "fake frame rate" in the Preferences.

Going by memory here, I think when I tested that program,
it said "200 FPS" in the preferences. That kinda put a smile
on my face (more of a smirk than a smile).
You are right it's 200 FPS. I must not be looking for professional quality
because the video's I download look OK to me.

Henry
 
P

Paul

Henry said:
You are right it's 200 FPS. I must not be looking for professional
quality because the video's I download look OK to me.

Henry

Well, that "200" is a fake frame rate, and you can figure out
the real frame rate with a little work (not that I remember
all the details now). I used some tool, perhaps
avidemux or the like, to break the captured movie down
into individual pictures. And from that, I figured out
what it had done. Took a fair bit of disk space for
the unraveling.

Paul
 
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P

Paul

Henry said:
Try CamStudio. Works on everything I've tried. Google for it. It's free.

Henry
Just discovered CamStudio is written to AVI 1.0 standard,
which causes a 4GB upper limit to file size. (Note - this is
not a FAT32 limit, AVI 1.0 also has a 2GB or 4GB limit. As other
people have noted, the AVI is corrupted from CamStudio, if
the file goes above 4GB.)

Apparently FRAPs, another screen recorder, has a 4GB file
size limit as well. I don't know what output options
FRAPs has got.

I had high hopes for the Linux XVIDCAP, but after a number
of tests, Linux is too broken, for all the broken bits
to work at the same time. I've had audio device failures
(no sound at all). DRM failure on Flash (error 2203, and
HAL was present and accounted for). PulseAudio based
OSes causing XVIDCAP to have no sound. I suspect XVIDCAP
can break the 4GB barrier, but at the moment, there
is a 99% probability that you won't be able to
record sound. A separate development for XVIDCAP-Pulseaudio
was started, but never finished. Development appears dead
in the water. There's no point recording audio separately,
because the odds of there being sync between a separately
recorded video and separately recorded audio, are zero.
You may think you can just throw them on the timeline of
a movie editor, and it'll all work, but it doesn't work that
way. If there's any frame loss in the recorded video, then
the timing between video and audio will have drifted off.

Phoning the TV station, by comparison, is a better option.
Or, using recording technology "external" to the PC.

I'd suggest one of the web-based flash recording schemes,
if I thought it could break the AdobeHDS scheme.

Paul
 
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