printing across a wireless network


B

badgolferman

My work laptop is Windows 7 Enterprise and logs into a domain. When I
take it home and attach to the wireless network in my house I would
like to use the shared printer on another computer on my network. How
can I do this without unjoining from the domain and joining the local
workgroup?
 
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S

Seth

badgolferman said:
My work laptop is Windows 7 Enterprise and logs into a domain. When I
take it home and attach to the wireless network in my house I would
like to use the shared printer on another computer on my network. How
can I do this without unjoining from the domain and joining the local
workgroup?
A) Don't unjoin from the work domain, you will probably create more problems
than you solve

B) you don't specify what the printer is, or what it is shared by (is it
direct connected to a host machine? Does it per chance have it's own network
interface so it can sit directly on the network? Is it a multi-function
printer or just a printer?)
 
B

badgolferman

Seth said:
A) Don't unjoin from the work domain, you will probably create more
problems than you solve

B) you don't specify what the printer is, or what it is shared by (is
it direct connected to a host machine? Does it per chance have it's
own network interface so it can sit directly on the network? Is it a
multi-function printer or just a printer?)
The printer is a multi-function printer connected via USB to another
computer on the wireless network. It has a wired NIC adapter which is
not used due to it's location.
 
S

Seth

badgolferman said:
The printer is a multi-function printer connected via USB to another
computer on the wireless network. It has a wired NIC adapter which is
not used due to it's location.
Well your easiest (depending on how far it is to wire) would be to put it on
the wired network and then any network client (wired or wireless) can print
directly with no security restrictions.

To print through the existing machine that is hosting it will require you to
authenticate against it (see help for use on the net use /user:username)
commands. Once authenticated you should be able to see all shared resources.

I would go the easy route however and get a wire to it form the home router.
Either direct wired if possible or get a wireless bridge (makes a wired
device wireless by the bridge being a client on the wireless network and
then providing a wired port for the non-wireless device).

Once the printer is wired (direct or through the bridge) the installation
software supplied by the printer manufacturer would do the rest (I know this
is true for HP and Brother printers, your unnamed printer could vary).
 
V

VanguardLH

badgolferman said:
My work laptop is Windows 7 Enterprise and logs into a domain. When I
take it home and attach to the wireless network in my house I would
like to use the shared printer on another computer on my network. How
can I do this without unjoining from the domain and joining the local
workgroup?
At home, you are NOT "joining a domain" to then unjoin from it. Don't
you have a separate login (not a domain login but a *local* account)?
If not and if you don't have admin privileges to create a new local
admin-level account then it's likely your employer expects you to
connect their property (the laptop they gave you to do remote work for
them) to their network (probably via VPN to secure the communications
along with validating your host has access to resources in their
network). The laptop is their property so contact their IT folks on how
to create a *local* Windows account that you can log into if you are
permitted to use their property for your personal use.
 
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S

SC Tom

VanguardLH said:
At home, you are NOT "joining a domain" to then unjoin from it. Don't
you have a separate login (not a domain login but a *local* account)?
If not and if you don't have admin privileges to create a new local
admin-level account then it's likely your employer expects you to
connect their property (the laptop they gave you to do remote work for
them) to their network (probably via VPN to secure the communications
along with validating your host has access to resources in their
network). The laptop is their property so contact their IT folks on how
to create a *local* Windows account that you can log into if you are
permitted to use their property for your personal use.
+1
 
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