No Mount Points -- what does that signify?


J

Juan Wei

Someone posted this on WIN-HOME but no one has answered:

**************

The mountvol command reveals three entries with no mount points:

1) \\?\Volume{0b3b6550-eba5-11e0-8319-806e6f6e6963}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***
2) \\?\Volume{0b3b654f-eba5-11e0-8319-806e6f6e6963}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***
3) \\?\Volume{a02616aa-1576-11e1-8779-d25a750d9fc3}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***

Can I safely remove these from the registry?

***********

Does anyone know the answer?
 
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J

JJ

Someone posted this on WIN-HOME but no one has answered:

**************

The mountvol command reveals three entries with no mount points:

1) \\?\Volume{0b3b6550-eba5-11e0-8319-806e6f6e6963}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***
2) \\?\Volume{0b3b654f-eba5-11e0-8319-806e6f6e6963}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***
3) \\?\Volume{a02616aa-1576-11e1-8779-d25a750d9fc3}\
*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***

Can I safely remove these from the registry?
Why do you want to delete them?
 
V

VanguardLH

Juan said:
Is there a reason not to?

1 and 2 are
duplicates anyway.
They define devices that were *previously* attached but aren't right
now, like USB-attached flash drives or external USB drives.

If you search on one of those Class GUIDs above (sans braces), what
entries do you find under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet?
Are any of those entries under the Enum\USB or Enum\USBSTOR subkeys
(the enumeration data compiled from the presentation info sent by a
USB device to record its identity and properties into the registry)?
Might one of those unmounted drives be for the CD burning software
included in Windows but not mounted until it's actually needed? When
I run the 'mountvol' console-mode command, it matches up with
"...\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\CD Burning"
with data item name "CD Recorder Drive".

Since you don't actually say you are having a problem (except perhaps
with compulsive triviality cleaning), what do you expect to gain by
deleting the associated registry entries? Are you having problems
when replugging in a drive to get it recognized correctly (which is
when you may have to delete its enumeration data from the registry)?
What's *broke* that you think you will fix with these deletions?

Since 1 and 2 are duplicates, could they be for the same USB device
that you have plugged into different USB ports at some time?
 
J

JJ

Is there a reason not to?
Hardware registry settings are not like software settings. They define a
detected device, either current or past ones. Manual deletion of hardware
registry settings should be avoided since it would break data
synchronization between registry and memory that are kept by the system,
which may cause system instability.
1 and 2 are duplicates anyway.
Which you should have mentioned in OP. -_-
There's no way to tell which one is the duplicate since volume GUID alone
can't be used to determine whether two volumes are physically identical.

But even though they're duplicate, from system's POV, they're not identical.
Device with different parent device (or with different greate/grandparent
device) are treated as different devices even though physically, there's
only one device that is simply plugged in different port. i.e.: different
device location means different device.

One will be the active device and the other(s) are inactive, where inactive
ones are treated as absent device. The system never deletes the registry for
inactive devices unless the driver include a custom software that automate
this task everytime a device is found inactive.

However, if the inactive one is deleted, the next time you plugged the
device onto that port again, the registry setting for that device will be
created again. So, there's no point for deleting an inactive device unless
that device will never be used again. e.g.: Device is broken and has been
replaced with a different model or manufacturer. Or formatted an FAT32
partition and replaced it with NTFS.

To properly delete(uninstall) a device from the registry, assuming it
doesn't require manufacturer's software to do it, use the Device Manager.
You'll need to set a special environment variable before running the Device
Manager in order to see inactive devices. First, open the Command Prompt as
Administrator. Then type in these two commands.

set DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1
mmc C:\WINDOWS\system32\devmgmt.msc

In the Device Manager, enable the "Show hidden device" menu item from the
"View" main menu (note: hidden devices are not same as inactive devices).
All inactive (non present) devices will have their icon dimmed
(semi-transparent). You may have to look very closely to identify if it's
inactive or not. Or you can simply look at the device property dialog where
the status will show as "Currently, this hardware device is not connected to
the computer".

When deleting, be sure to delete the child device (that depend on other
device) first.

For a floppy drive, e.g.: delete the floppy drive, then delete the floppy
controller.

For a HDD, e.g.: delete the volume shadow copy, then delete the volume, then
delete the HDD. HDDs with multiple partitions will have multipe volumes, and
each volume has its own shadow copy.

For a USB thumb drive, e.g.: perform HDD deletion above, then delete the USB
storage.
 
J

Juan Wei

VanguardLH has written on 7/19/2013 5:55 AM:
They define devices that were *previously* attached but aren't right
now, like USB-attached flash drives or external USB drives.

If you search on one of those Class GUIDs above (sans braces), what
entries do you find under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet?
Are any of those entries under the Enum\USB or Enum\USBSTOR subkeys
(the enumeration data compiled from the presentation info sent by a
USB device to record its identity and properties into the registry)?
Might one of those unmounted drives be for the CD burning software
included in Windows but not mounted until it's actually needed? When
I run the 'mountvol' console-mode command, it matches up with
"...\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\CD Burning"
with data item name "CD Recorder Drive".
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\MountPoints2\?\

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\MountPoints2\CPC\

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Dfrg\Statistics\

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current\Version\SPP\Clients\

HKLM\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\services\VSS\Diag\VolSnap

etc.

for 1 and 2

And it's duplicated many times.
Since you don't actually say you are having a problem (except perhaps
with compulsive triviality cleaning), what do you expect to gain by
deleting the associated registry entries? Are you having problems
when replugging in a drive to get it recognized correctly (which is
when you may have to delete its enumeration data from the registry)?
What's *broke* that you think you will fix with these deletions?
The "***" in "*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***" stood out.
 
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J

Juan Wei

Andy Burns has written on 7/19/2013 6:14 AM:
Why not ask the O/P to come and ask here themselves if they still have a
problem?
Hates USENET because of the childish postings that occur sometimes.
 
V

VanguardLH

Juan said:
VanguardLH has written on 7/19/2013 5:55 AM:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\MountPoints2\?\
HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\MountPoints2\CPC\
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Dfrg\Statistics\
Ever defrag an external drive?
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current\Version\SPP\Clients\
Um, you sure it was "Current\Version" and not "CurrentVersion"?

Do you have System Restore enabled?
http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/23147-how-turn-off-system-protection-registry-regedit.html
HKLM\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\services\VSS\Diag\VolSnap
Don't know if that is your current control config set (the one used on
login) or some old one. The registry keeps track of config sets and
why there's an option to use a prior config in the boot-time menu.

Old control config sets (ControlSet<index>) will have lots of remnant
definitions that you deleted through normal configuration methods in
your current config. When you tweak, configure, regedit, or access
drives, changes to registry settings are made in the current control
set, not old ones. To see which numerically indexed config set is the
current one, go look at:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Select

You could have a dozen old config sets lingering in the registry but
the only one you care about (unless you're trying to restore to a
prior config) is the current or default one. So either use the above
key to figure out which one is current when you are logged in or just
stick with settings under the CurrentControlSet key and ignore any
settings under the numerically indexed ones.

Since you are including the old control sets in your count of how many
of these ghost drives are referenced in the registry, a lot will
probably disappear from your count if you don't search or list those
you find in those old control sets.
The "***" in "*** NO MOUNT POINTS ***" stood out.
That's not an error message nor does it specify a problem with
hardware, software apps, or the OS. It does not announce a problem.
 
V

VanguardLH

Juan said:
Andy Burns has written on 7/19/2013 6:14 AM:

Hates USENET because of the childish postings that occur sometimes.
But trying to relay through you questions to the OP about *his* use of
his computer means delays or never getting the info. If he hates
Usenet because of posts that he doesn't want to see, he has declared
that he is too lazy to define kill filters.
 
J

Juan Wei

VanguardLH has written on 7/20/2013 4:40 AM:
Um, you sure it was "Current\Version" and not "CurrentVersion"?
Oops.

Do you have System Restore enabled?
http://www.sevenforums.com/performance-maintenance/23147-how-turn-off-system-protection-registry-regedit.html
Why would I want to turn off System Restore?
Don't know if that is your current control config set (the one used on
login) or some old one. The registry keeps track of config sets and
why there's an option to use a prior config in the boot-time menu.

Old control config sets (ControlSet<index>) will have lots of remnant
definitions that you deleted through normal configuration methods in
your current config. When you tweak, configure, regedit, or access
drives, changes to registry settings are made in the current control
set, not old ones. To see which numerically indexed config set is the
current one, go look at:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Select
Current 1
Default 1
Failed 0
LastKnownGood 2

Under HKLM\SYSTEM, I have ControlSet001, ControlSet002 and
CurrentControlSet.
That's not an error message nor does it specify a problem with
hardware, software apps, or the OS. It does not announce a problem.
Then why did they supply the triple stars? Certainly, they were meant to
get attention?

And, no, I'm not having a problem with "compulsive triviality cleaning",
as you so kindly put it. You can actually show your great knowledge and
experience without being condescending, you know. :)
 
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V

VanguardLH

Juan said:
VanguardLH has written on 7/20/2013 4:40 AM:


Why would I want to turn off System Restore?
Because you're fearful of mount points that aren't currently active.
Current 1
Default 1
Failed 0
LastKnownGood 2

Under HKLM\SYSTEM, I have ControlSet001, ControlSet002 and
CurrentControlSet.
So CurrentControlSet = CurrentControl001. No point in search in both
subkeys since they'll have the same settings (i.e., you'll see doubled
settings in 2 keys but they are both the same).
Then why did they supply the triple stars? Certainly, they were meant to
get attention?
Wouldn't matter if there were no stars and even if in lowercase. You
seeing "no mount points" would've still triggered your inquiry as it
would look, to you, like something was amiss.

Besides, maybe you were having a problem, like USB-attached drives
that don't properly issue their presentation data or it is non-unique
which results in enumeration problems in the registry (Enum key). It
is something you might want to look at. Most times not. If there had
been a problem then running mountvol might've been a troubleshooting
step; else, why did you run that command? If you're going to play
around with the mountvol command, it's possible you create a
definition that you forgot to remove later.

You could backup your registry (export it, for example) and use
mountvol to remove those definitions. Then see if something doesn't
run correctly; however, it could be days, weeks, or months before
those registry entries were needed again. For enumeration, and if the
device issue valid and complete presentation data for enumeration, it
would simply get reentered and you wouldn't have a problem later.

I've already mentioned what my "no mount points" definition pointed
to, and obviously it wasn't a critical problem or even one needing to
be addressed. Now it's up to you to figure it out (since what you've
offered is too little data to determine what's defined in your
registry for those class GUIDs).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS_volume_mount_point

Possible some of your mount points are junction points, something more
used since Vista.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc753321.aspx
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc938934.aspx

Junctions have been around since probably Windows 2000. Just because
Microsoft didn't include any enduser tools to manage them didn't
obviate the feature from NTFS. You might have junction points defined
by some software you installed. For example, I create "References"
junction point in My Documents to point a C:\References so I can see
my ref docs under my docs without having to know where they are
actually located, and can do the same in every user profile's My Docs
so all users would be sharing the same ref docs folder.

http://windowsitpro.com/systems-management/using-mount-points-imy-documentsi

There are lots of reasons to create mount points. You saw someone
else ask about them, took up and waved their banner, but the cause is
not yours (i.e., you're not having real problems, just imagined ones).
Since you decided to take up someone else's question of:

Can I safely remove these from the registry?

Yes, they can be safely removed *if* you know what they are for and
are willing to track all the dependencies in the registry to get as
much a complete picture of their definitions as possible, or you're
willing to risk later problems but backed up those entries to restore
them later if needed.

Remove them if you want. See what happens, if anything (that you
notice since re-enumeration will be hidden to you for re-inserted USB
devices). If they are mount points used for redirection in folders,
well, it's still safe to delete the mount points but then you lose the
redirection (but not the target folder and files).
 

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