Mouse question


G

Gene E. Bloch

I've been away, so I'm replying late to this thread, but let me add
the following to the other replies you've gotten:

Why do you particularly want a wireless mouse? I can see the value of
a wireless mouse for a laptop, but for a desktop, there's no value at
all, as far as I'm concerned. I've tried a wireless mouse a couple of
times, but have always given up and gone back to wireless mice: they
are just as convenient, and much more reliable.
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
 
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V

VanguardLH

Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
Wasn't there a "wireless" mouse where the pad was the transmitter
instead of the mouse? The mouse was uncorded and had no battery. Being
uncorded meant no torque on the mouse from a cord bending around stuff
on the desk or dragging on the desk. No battery meant it was
lightweight hence less finger fatigue. There was no transmitter in the
mouse. The pad had the transmitter. The pad would capacitively detect
the position of the mouse. The pad was the active device. The pad was
connected to the PC, not the mouse. So you had the advantages of a
wireless mouse (no cord) without its disadvantages (battery weight and
depleting battery power).

This had a passive mouse (no cord) whose position was detected by an
active pad (with cord or wireless). This would be akin to a stylus used
on a screen.

As for a corded mouse getting slightly repositioned when released due to
torque from the cord, I've found that happens with corded mice that have
thick stiff cords. Some are oversized and use overly stiff vinyl to
cover the wires. I get corded mice with skinny and flexible cords. Of
course, being skinny and flexy means more likely to break; however, in
my experience, the buttons on the mouse go flakey long before there is a
connection problem at the point where the cord enters the mouse casing
(i.e., where is the flex stress on the cord). As with keyboard where
you select them based on what you like for feel, do the same for mice.
The stiffness of the cord is part of the feel of the mouse.
 
C

choro

What a hullabaloo about nothing! I've got a wired mouse with no drag,
not any that I can feel anyway. And it is devoid of any problems or
potential problems that can and do exist with wireless mice.

Just allow an S loop in the cable behind the mouse for heaven's sake.
You can then move the mouse with absolutely no drag. Simple and effective.

This is a general response rather than a response to the last posting on
this thread.

Let's start a discussion on whether you prepare the french dressing for
salad in advance, or not and whether you apply the salt, pepper,lemon or
vinegar, and olive oil in that order or in a different order. It
certainly makes more difference to the end product than whether the cat
has bitten off the tail of the mouse or not!
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
Wasn't there a "wireless" mouse where the pad was the transmitter
instead of the mouse? The mouse was uncorded and had no battery. Being
uncorded meant no torque on the mouse from a cord bending around stuff
on the desk or dragging on the desk. No battery meant it was
lightweight hence less finger fatigue. There was no transmitter in the
mouse. The pad had the transmitter.
I think I recall a Wacom drawing tablet which could use both a mouse
that worked as you describe and a stylus for drawing. The stylus was
unpowered as well, IIRC. But it was 5 or 10 years ago, so I might be
remembering wrong.

But before that memory crept into my brain, as I read your description
of that mouse, I thought it was a great idea that I hadn't heard of
before...
 
K

Ken Blake

I've been away, so I'm replying late to this thread, but let me add
the following to the other replies you've gotten:

Why do you particularly want a wireless mouse? I can see the value of
a wireless mouse for a laptop, but for a desktop, there's no value at
all, as far as I'm concerned. I've tried a wireless mouse a couple of
times, but have always given up and gone back to wireless mice: they
are just as convenient, and much more reliable.
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.

It might have been me. I vaguely remember a discussion like this
before. I don't have that problem at all. Whether the cord moves
depends on how it and the mouse are located, and possible even whether
it's a mouse that's very light in weight.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
It might have been me. I vaguely remember a discussion like this
before. I don't have that problem at all. Whether the cord moves
depends on how it and the mouse are located, and possible even whether
it's a mouse that's very light in weight.
It might have included you :)

There were a couple of others as well, IIRC.

And one of those has even responded in this thread with a suggestion to
try things that I have already tried many times :)
 
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G

Gene Wirchenko

On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 13:58:18 -0700, "Gene E. Bloch"

[snip]
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...
I used to have your problem.

Position the cord so that it can move without running into
something. On my desk, the mouse cord can move in an area extending
to about 8" back of the mousepad. I have nothing there so the cord
does not get any spring in it.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
P

Paul

Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
It might have been me. I vaguely remember a discussion like this
before. I don't have that problem at all. Whether the cord moves
depends on how it and the mouse are located, and possible even whether
it's a mouse that's very light in weight.
It might have included you :)

There were a couple of others as well, IIRC.

And one of those has even responded in this thread with a suggestion to
try things that I have already tried many times :)
I keep the cord on my wired mouse suspended, so less of it
drags on the table.

And the reason I did that, is in the middle of a game, the cord
used to snag at the worst possible moment, in some clutter
on the desktop. To stop that, I elevated the cord (lifted
the middle of it), so most of the time it drifts over
things on the table without getting caught. The amount of
slack cord is adjustable, and it's set "exactly right"
now, after many "trials and errors".

Now, this one is kooky, and my scheme doesn't
look anything like this.

http://www.pc-look.com/boutik/images/Plus2/700966-005_p001.jpg

This is someone's home brew solution to mouse wire, and
mine is along these lines. I.e. Find the highest object
in the vicinity, that won't fall over, and put a C clamp
on it to hold the wire. The wire passes through the C clamp,
so there is some play there. (The clamp doesn't
pinch the wire or anything, just provides a loop
to hold the wire up.)

http://i.imgur.com/YcL06l.jpg

Paul
 
J

James Silverton

Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did
not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
It might have been me. I vaguely remember a discussion like this
before. I don't have that problem at all. Whether the cord moves
depends on how it and the mouse are located, and possible even whether
it's a mouse that's very light in weight.
It might have included you :)

There were a couple of others as well, IIRC.

And one of those has even responded in this thread with a suggestion to
try things that I have already tried many times :)
I keep the cord on my wired mouse suspended, so less of it
drags on the table.

And the reason I did that, is in the middle of a game, the cord
used to snag at the worst possible moment, in some clutter
on the desktop. To stop that, I elevated the cord (lifted
the middle of it), so most of the time it drifts over
things on the table without getting caught. The amount of
slack cord is adjustable, and it's set "exactly right"
now, after many "trials and errors".

Now, this one is kooky, and my scheme doesn't
look anything like this.

http://www.pc-look.com/boutik/images/Plus2/700966-005_p001.jpg

This is someone's home brew solution to mouse wire, and
mine is along these lines. I.e. Find the highest object
in the vicinity, that won't fall over, and put a C clamp
on it to hold the wire. The wire passes through the C clamp,
so there is some play there. (The clamp doesn't
pinch the wire or anything, just provides a loop
to hold the wire up.)

http://i.imgur.com/YcL06l.jpg
I use a Logitech cordless keyboard and mouse (K520 and M310). I like
them but the only disconcerting thing is the low battery warning for the
mouse does not give much time to do anything about it.
 
B

Bob I

Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
Wasn't there a "wireless" mouse where the pad was the transmitter
instead of the mouse? The mouse was uncorded and had no battery.
Yep, we call them touchpads.
 
V

VanguardLH

Bob said:
Gene said:
I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.
Wasn't there a "wireless" mouse where the pad was the transmitter
instead of the mouse? The mouse was uncorded and had no battery.
Yep, we call them touchpads.
You thought "mouse" meant finger? I've heard of people being called
Mouse but never them naming one of their fingers as Mouse.
 
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B

Bob I

Bob said:
Gene E. Bloch wrote:

I can only speak for myself[1], but I find that a corded mouse is hard
to control in certain circumstances. When one removes one's hand from
the mouse, the cord can move it a bit...

[1] In an earlier thread (somewhere), some people said that they did not
have my problem, and so of course they did not agree with me.

Wasn't there a "wireless" mouse where the pad was the transmitter
instead of the mouse? The mouse was uncorded and had no battery.
Yep, we call them touchpads.
You thought "mouse" meant finger? I've heard of people being called
Mouse but never them naming one of their fingers as Mouse.
Did this mouse have buttons and/or a scroll wheel?
 

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