Install 64-bit Windows 7 cleanly with OEM and hardware upgrades'reactivations?


J

Joe Morris

The first machine I worked on had a cycle time of one microsecond. The
later model upped the speed to a cycle time of half a microsecond. Like
Turbo, man!

(IBM 7090 & 7094, if you're wondering.)
IIRC the 7090 I programmed had a memory cycle of 2.4 usec; this was the time
to read or write one 36-bit word. I never used a 7094.

First machine that I actually operated had a 5 usec memory cycle for 18
bits: a DEC PDP-1.

Joe
 
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E

Ed Cryer

IIRC the 7090 I programmed had a memory cycle of 2.4 usec; this was the time
to read or write one 36-bit word. I never used a 7094.

First machine that I actually operated had a 5 usec memory cycle for 18
bits: a DEC PDP-1.

Joe
I worked as a programmer on second-generation ICL-1900 mainframes; clock
speed about 1MHtz. The others in the office had moved up from first-gen
1300 machines in which one woman told me she regularly used to hide from
her boss in the cupboard that held all the memory valves.

Ed
 
C

charlie

I worked as a programmer on second-generation ICL-1900 mainframes; clock
speed about 1MHtz. The others in the office had moved up from first-gen
1300 machines in which one woman told me she regularly used to hide from
her boss in the cupboard that held all the memory valves.

Ed
"she regularly used to hide from her boss in the cupboard that held all
the memory valves."

Sounds like an old Univac system that I encountered in the 60's at
Franklin Life. It used hundreds of 4146 or 6146 ?? tubes as flip flops,
and had hexagonal equipment bays with room to hide inside. (The amateurs
used the tube for 50Mhz? transmitters as well.) There usually was a big
Tektronix oscilloscope on a card parked inside. (Those were the days!)
I have no idea what a PDP-1 was. My earliest recollection was a PDP-8.
There was a PDP-11 that was the successor to the PDP-8.

I guess the decades are showing!
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

IIRC the 7090 I programmed had a memory cycle of 2.4 usec; this was the time
to read or write one 36-bit word. I never used a 7094.

First machine that I actually operated had a 5 usec memory cycle for 18
bits: a DEC PDP-1.

Joe
I initially had typed 2 and 1 microseconds, then corrected it before
hitting Send. Maybe I changed it from right to wrong :)

I no longer have a copy of the IBM 7090 Principles of Operation, oddly
enough, so I can't check. Well, I could Google - another new-fangled
thing that didn't exist back then.
 
E

Ed Cryer

"she regularly used to hide from her boss in the cupboard that held all
the memory valves."

Sounds like an old Univac system that I encountered in the 60's at
Franklin Life. It used hundreds of 4146 or 6146 ?? tubes as flip flops,
and had hexagonal equipment bays with room to hide inside. (The amateurs
used the tube for 50Mhz? transmitters as well.) There usually was a big
Tektronix oscilloscope on a card parked inside. (Those were the days!)
I have no idea what a PDP-1 was. My earliest recollection was a PDP-8.
There was a PDP-11 that was the successor to the PDP-8.

I guess the decades are showing!
Let 'em show. I guess we've been living through one of the most
speeded-up technological revolutions that the world has ever known.
And what else can you demand from life, apart maybe from having had a
one-to-one with God?

Ed
 
P

Philip Herlihy

I worked as a programmer on second-generation ICL-1900 mainframes; clock
speed about 1MHtz. The others in the office had moved up from first-gen
1300 machines in which one woman told me she regularly used to hide from
her boss in the cupboard that held all the memory valves.

Ed
My first programming was done on an ICL 1906a - I'd love to have some
idea what the spec was in terms of processor speed, memory, and storage
capacity.

I had the knack (common at the time) of holding a card up to the light
to see if a punching error was correctable with a single-hole punch.

These kids today...

Humph.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

My first programming was done on an ICL 1906a - I'd love to have some
idea what the spec was in terms of processor speed, memory, and storage
capacity.

I had the knack (common at the time) of holding a card up to the light
to see if a punching error was correctable with a single-hole punch.

These kids today...

Humph.
I once patched a binary deck that way. The results were so bad that I
never tried it again :)

I miscounted holes, or something, and concluded that the compiler had a
steadier hand than I did.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Gene E. Bloch said:
Even a cell phone does that :)
There was a trailer on BBC recently (I didn't watch the program trailed)
about the space programme - the trail concluded with words something
like "the really amazing thing is that they did this with technology
that had less power than a mobile 'phone", at the same time panning out
to show that the trail (shots of spacecraft etc.) had actually been on
the screen of a smartphone. Of course, being the vintage I am (51), I
thought "silly - it was FAR less powerful than that" - IIRR, the Apollo
computer had something like 64K of memory, several orders of magnitude
less than a smartphone! However, it occurs to me that the person making
the trail might have been too young to know that.
The first machine I worked on had a cycle time of one microsecond. The
later model upped the speed to a cycle time of half a microsecond. Like
Turbo, man!

(IBM 7090 & 7094, if you're wondering.)
about 100 kHz max. (could also run at about 10 Hz and 1 Hz, for
demonstration/debugging purposes) in my case. Also a memory of 16 (no,
not 16k).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you like making stuff there's always somebody ready to say that its
ridiculous. But, actually, I don't think it is. In fact, enthusiasms are good.
Hobbies are healthy. They don't harm anybody. - James May in RT, 6-12
November 2010.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

R. C. said:
Hi, Ant.


No.

With the full retail license, you can install on "the same computer" an
unlimited number of times. (See other discussions for definitions of
"the same computer".) And you can reinstall on any number of different
computers, so long as you UNinstall all previous installations
beforehand. (They even allow a slight overlap in time, so that you can
install on the new computer before you remove it from the old machine,
giving you time to migrate apps and data.) Also, of course, there is
the 120-day major loophole: You can activate online if it has been
more than 120 days since your last activation of the same Product Key.
[]
Surely that 120-day thing has some limitation? I can't imagine them
letting multiple computers with the same key continue to operate
indefinitely, just because they were activated four months apart;
otherwise I could see builders buying a limited number of licences (the
number being 4 months divided by their machine build frequency, plus a
bit for margin), then using them in rotation indefinitely, to sell lots
of machines.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)[email protected]+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you like making stuff there's always somebody ready to say that its
ridiculous. But, actually, I don't think it is. In fact, enthusiasms are good.
Hobbies are healthy. They don't harm anybody. - James May in RT, 6-12
November 2010.
 
E

Ed Cryer

My first programming was done on an ICL 1906a - I'd love to have some
idea what the spec was in terms of processor speed, memory, and storage
capacity.

I had the knack (common at the time) of holding a card up to the light
to see if a punching error was correctable with a single-hole punch.

These kids today...

Humph.
Well met, Philip. You and I might have bumped into each other around the
UK. I worked all over; including Manchester, London, Hastings and Edinburgh.

Ed
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Well met, Philip. You and I might have bumped into each other around the
UK. I worked all over; including Manchester, London, Hastings and
Edinburgh.

Ed
This'll interest you;
http://www.fcs.eu.com/icl1900/index.html

The fastest was the 1906s with a 1MHz CPU.
The amount of memory actually used is quite staggeringly low; 512KB for
the biggest. No wonder we all became so expert at modular programming
and overlaying techniques.

Ed
 
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