Good idea.


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J

James Silverton

I avoid "mouse fatigue" by using a track ball mouse.
If your wrist hurts you should be careful because I think you are on the
edge of carpal tunnel syndrome. Why don't you use a mouse pad with a
wrist support? I use a cordless mouse too but I find the support useful,
it doesn't roll away and I don't move the mouse enough to be restricted
by the pad.
 
W

Wolf K

If your wrist hurts you should be careful because I think you are on the
edge of carpal tunnel syndrome.

If it hurts, the damage is already done.

Wolf K.
 
A

Asger Joergensen

Hi Wolf

Wolf said:
If it hurts, the damage is already done.
No, no... thats not true..
If that was true, pain would not be a very smart thing, but
fortunately pain is a very smart thing, it warns us that we are
doing something wrong, so we can stop doing it and find another way.


Best regards
Asger-P
http://Asger-P.dk/software
Quick Launch is a must try.
 
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C

charlie

I avoid "mouse fatigue" by using a track ball mouse.

I've used track balls since the mini computer days,
and don't care much for "mice".
HP used to build them in in some of the terminals
and test station consoles. A full size billiard ball
was close to the original size of the HP track balls.
 
J

Jeff Layman

Hi Wolf



No, no... thats not true..
If that was true, pain would not be a very smart thing, but
fortunately pain is a very smart thing, it warns us that we are
doing something wrong, so we can stop doing it and find another way.
Pain is neither smart nor not smart - it only tells us there is
something wrong; we are free to ignore it if we want to, and can stand it.

Perhaps the strangest thing is with the most extreme pain that we can do
nothing about (this is often said to be that associated with kidney
stones). In fact, internal pain is sometimes "referred" to somewhere
else which can be very misleading. The pain of angina is often felt in
the upper arm, rather than the chest. No point in rubbing your arm to
make the pain better...
 
W

Wolf K

Pain is neither smart nor not smart - it only tells us there is
something wrong; we are free to ignore it if we want to, and can stand it.

Perhaps the strangest thing is with the most extreme pain that we can do
nothing about (this is often said to be that associated with kidney
stones). In fact, internal pain is sometimes "referred" to somewhere
else which can be very misleading. The pain of angina is often felt in
the upper arm, rather than the chest. No point in rubbing your arm to
make the pain better...
The pain of carpal tunnel damage is insidious. By the time you feel
pain, the tunnel is already inflamed, and the ligaments are tightening
up. At this stage, the damage is mostly reversible. If you take the
appropriate steps, you can live with the residual damage. Paradoxically,
at a later stage, the wrist goes numb. At this stage, much of the damage
is permanent. Operation to loosen the tunnel is about the only cure. -
Based on my wife's experience, BTW.

HTH,
Wolf K.
 
R

Robert Sudbury

If your wrist hurts you should be careful because I think you are on the
edge of carpal tunnel syndrome. Why don't you use a mouse pad with a
wrist support? I use a cordless mouse too but I find the support useful,
it doesn't roll away and I don't move the mouse enough to be restricted
by the pad.
Be careful about that. Most Keyboard wrist "rests" and mousepad wrist
"rests" are meant to be used when "resting", NOT while actually using
the keyboard or mouse.

The ergonomics of typing and mousing are such that your hand is supposed
to be effortlessly lifted slightly off the keyboard or table top. If
you ever took a typing class you should have been taught to type with
your hands off the desk top. This also leads into proper height
positioning of the desktop/keyboard so you aren't lifting your shoulders
to lift your arms to lift your hands.

Having said that, if you secure a rest that is soft enough, pliable
enough that supports without compression of the nerves or reducing the
blood flow in your wrist or hand, give it a shot, but don't use it as a
replacement for good posture.

RSI aren't to be sneezed at. I blew out my upper body muscles 17 years
ago after working as an electronic artist for 8 years. I had to give up
computers, driving and opening my own doors for over a year before my
physiotherapy had rebuilt enough of my endurance to be able to function
again. I have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Cubital Tunnel Syndrome and
Chronic Bilateral Tendinitis. I've lost about 20% of the feeling in my
left hand's pinky and ring fingers (Cubital/Ulnar nerve) and into my
forearm on a good day, and I'm in constant pain or tingling.

To this day I cannot endure placing my arms or hands flat against any
hard surface for anymore than a couple of seconds.

Something I used to keep my wrists warm and support them, that actually
helped in times of need were:

http://www.mousemitt.com/

Strangely, don't also rule out light, reflections, noise, monitor tilt,
distance from monitor to your eyes, monitor height compared to your
natural resting position of your head, seat height, seat angles, back
support... so many things, and they all add up.

Track balls can have their own set of problems too. It's up to the
individual to find what works for them. Pain IS an indicator that
you're doing something that your body doesn't like, so don't ignore it.
 
P

Percival P. Cassidy

Don't you then get 'thumb fatigue'?
I use a Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman. The ball is larger than on a
typical trackball and is operated with my index and and finger, not with
my thumb. It doesn't suit my wife, because of dexterity problems
resulting from an accident.

Perce
 
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T

The Seabat

I'm with you, Dave. How anyone can use a regular mouse with a monitor
larger than 24" is beyond me. You have to pick and move the mouse from
one side of the mouse pad to the other just to get across the screen!
Some times you have to do this more than twice. With a trackball you
just flip your fingers and, Bam!, there it is on the other side. And
the mouse never moves from the original position!
 
K

Ken Springer

I'm with you, Dave. How anyone can use a regular mouse with a monitor
larger than 24" is beyond me. You have to pick and move the mouse from
one side of the mouse pad to the other just to get across the screen!
Some times you have to do this more than twice. With a trackball you
just flip your fingers and, Bam!, there it is on the other side. And
the mouse never moves from the original position!
A user might find a happy medium with the scrolling and tracking speeds
of a mouse. Including the option of different mice.

I tried using trackballs one time, never could seem to get them under
control. But, I'm not a gamer, either, and that experience will
undoubtedly help in using a trackball on a computer.


--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.6.8
Firefox 11.0
Thunderbird 11.0.1
LibreOffice 3.5.0 rc3
 
A

Andy Burns

The said:
How anyone can use a regular mouse with a monitor
larger than 24" is beyond me. You have to pick and move the mouse from
one side of the mouse pad to the other just to get across the screen!
Some times you have to do this more than twice.
Rubbish, just make sure you get a high DPI mouse and leave it set with
pointer acceleration enabled, I don't need to move more than a couple of
inches.
 
A

Asger Joergensen

Hi The

The said:
I'm with you, Dave. How anyone can use a regular mouse with a monitor
larger than 24" is beyond me. You have to pick and move the mouse from
one side of the mouse pad to the other just to get across the screen!
Some times you have to do this more than twice.
Windows have an accelerator feature that make the pointer move even faster
if You move faster. I can make my pointer get across 2 x 24" screens with
a move of just 4 cm.



Best regards
Asger-P
http://Asger-P.dk/software
Quick Launch is a must try.
 
J

James Silverton

I'm with you, Dave. How anyone can use a regular mouse with a monitor
larger than 24" is beyond me. You have to pick and move the mouse from
one side of the mouse pad to the other just to get across the screen!
Some times you have to do this more than twice. With a trackball you
just flip your fingers and, Bam!, there it is on the other side. And
the mouse never moves from the original position!
Not if you set acceleration a bit higher in Windows 7.
 
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B

BillW50

Robert Sudbury said:
Be careful about that. Most Keyboard wrist "rests" and mousepad
wrist "rests" are meant to be used when "resting", NOT while actually
using the keyboard or mouse.

The ergonomics of typing and mousing are such that your hand is
supposed to be effortlessly lifted slightly off the keyboard or table
top. If you ever took a typing class you should have been taught to
type with your hands off the desk top. This also leads into proper
height positioning of the desktop/keyboard so you aren't lifting your
shoulders to lift your arms to lift your hands.

Having said that, if you secure a rest that is soft enough, pliable
enough that supports without compression of the nerves or reducing the
blood flow in your wrist or hand, give it a shot, but don't use it as
a replacement for good posture.
I have a mouse pad with a rest and I flip it 180 degrees so it is out of
the way. I don't know why, but that pad annoys me. I never had carpal
tunnel syndrome per se, but my chair has adjustable arm rests and are
adjusted just a tad higher than my mouse. And I can work virtually
forever this way.
RSI aren't to be sneezed at. I blew out my upper body muscles 17
years ago after working as an electronic artist for 8 years. I had to
give up computers, driving and opening my own doors for over a year
before my physiotherapy had rebuilt enough of my endurance to be able
to function again. I have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Cubital Tunnel
Syndrome and Chronic Bilateral Tendinitis. I've lost about 20% of the
feeling in my left hand's pinky and ring fingers (Cubital/Ulnar nerve)
and into my forearm on a good day, and I'm in constant pain or
tingling.
I don't know anything about that. But being a diabetic, I have nerve
damage called diabetic neuropathy. Which I am well aware of the pain,
tingling, and numbness feeling (usually just one or two of them at the
same time). Mostly feet and lower legs. Not too often in my hands. And
what is RSI anyway?
To this day I cannot endure placing my arms or hands flat against any
hard surface for anymore than a couple of seconds.

Something I used to keep my wrists warm and support them, that
actually helped in times of need were:

http://www.mousemitt.com/

Strangely, don't also rule out light, reflections, noise, monitor
tilt, distance from monitor to your eyes, monitor height compared to
your natural resting position of your head, seat height, seat angles,
back support... so many things, and they all add up.
Sounds like great advice to me.
Track balls can have their own set of problems too. It's up to the
individual to find what works for them. Pain IS an indicator that
you're doing something that your body doesn't like, so don't ignore
it.
I used trackballs about 20 years ago and I loved them. I don't know why
I ever stopped. Although I only liked the billiard size trackballs that
if you gave it a quick spin, would spin 20 or more times around.
 
P

Peter Jason

The pain of carpal tunnel damage is insidious. By the time you feel
pain, the tunnel is already inflamed, and the ligaments are tightening
up. At this stage, the damage is mostly reversible. If you take the
appropriate steps, you can live with the residual damage. Paradoxically,
at a later stage, the wrist goes numb. At this stage, much of the damage
is permanent. Operation to loosen the tunnel is about the only cure. -
Based on my wife's experience, BTW.

HTH,
Wolf K.
I had to change hands to the right because of CTD and it took only two
days to become proficient with this. As a schoolboy I took piano
lessons (now long forgotten) but I started practicing scales (slowly)
to excercise the hands in a different way. After two months all signs
of CTD pain disappeared.
 
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I

Irwell

A user might find a happy medium with the scrolling and tracking speeds
of a mouse. Including the option of different mice.

I tried using trackballs one time, never could seem to get them under
control. But, I'm not a gamer, either, and that experience will
undoubtedly help in using a trackball on a computer.
Just changing the 'Right Click" to 'Left Click" is easy to do
any saves any strain on the index finger.
 

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