Finally got a Bluescreen in Windows 7


Y

Yousuf Khan

Well you might find this strange, but I'm excited by this, in a geeky
way. One thing that I have not seen in a long time since installing
Windows 7 was a BSOD. Used to get them occasionally under XP. Actually
with XP, when I used to get them, then I'd get them regularly, maybe
once a day until the driver (or whatever) creating the chaos was
replaced. So far in W7, it's only one BSOD, no signs of it repeating.

When I had XP and used to get BSOD's, I was particularly fond of a
freeware tool called BlueScreenView from NirSoft. Super useful, and
automated a manual debugging job down to a second that which would've
taken minutes if you had to do it by hand using the Microsoft debugging
tools.

Blue screen of death (STOP error) information in dump files.
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html

I haven't really had a chance to use Bluescreenview on a Windows 7
computer yet. So here's my first opportunity. BSV produced the following
saved report:

==================================================
Dump File : 070112-14586-01.dmp
Crash Time : 01/07/2012 12:06:55 PM
Bug Check String : DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug Check Code : 0x0000009f
Parameter 1 : 00000000`00000003
Parameter 2 : fffffa80`082464f0
Parameter 3 : fffff800`00b9c518
Parameter 4 : fffffa80`06c8eca0
Caused By Driver : ntoskrnl.exe
Caused By Address : ntoskrnl.exe+7f1c0
File Description : NT Kernel & System
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 6.1.7601.17835 (win7sp1_gdr.120503-2030)
Processor : x64
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\Windows\minidump\070112-14586-01.dmp
Processors Count : 6
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 7601
==================================================

So it turned out the culprit is the Windows kernel itself, and it's due
to a power state problem. And as usual, there is no fix to the problem
yet. Oh well, at least I got a chance to use it on Windows 7 finally. :)

Yousuf Khan
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Yousuf said:
Well you might find this strange, but I'm excited by this, in a geeky
way. One thing that I have not seen in a long time since installing
Windows 7 was a BSOD. Used to get them occasionally under XP. Actually
with XP, when I used to get them, then I'd get them regularly, maybe
once a day until the driver (or whatever) creating the chaos was
replaced. So far in W7, it's only one BSOD, no signs of it repeating.

When I had XP and used to get BSOD's, I was particularly fond of a
freeware tool called BlueScreenView from NirSoft. Super useful, and
automated a manual debugging job down to a second that which would've
taken minutes if you had to do it by hand using the Microsoft debugging
tools.

Blue screen of death (STOP error) information in dump files.
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html

I haven't really had a chance to use Bluescreenview on a Windows 7
computer yet. So here's my first opportunity. BSV produced the following
saved report:

==================================================
Dump File : 070112-14586-01.dmp
Crash Time : 01/07/2012 12:06:55 PM
Bug Check String : DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug Check Code : 0x0000009f
Parameter 1 : 00000000`00000003
Parameter 2 : fffffa80`082464f0
Parameter 3 : fffff800`00b9c518
Parameter 4 : fffffa80`06c8eca0
Caused By Driver : ntoskrnl.exe
Caused By Address : ntoskrnl.exe+7f1c0
File Description : NT Kernel & System
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 6.1.7601.17835 (win7sp1_gdr.120503-2030)
Processor : x64
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\Windows\minidump\070112-14586-01.dmp
Processors Count : 6
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 7601
==================================================

So it turned out the culprit is the Windows kernel itself, and it's due
to a power state problem. And as usual, there is no fix to the problem
yet. Oh well, at least I got a chance to use it on Windows 7 finally. :)

Yousuf Khan
Have you sent the report + info to MS?
They should certainly have that.

Ed
 
C

charlie

Well you might find this strange, but I'm excited by this, in a geeky
way. One thing that I have not seen in a long time since installing
Windows 7 was a BSOD. Used to get them occasionally under XP. Actually
with XP, when I used to get them, then I'd get them regularly, maybe
once a day until the driver (or whatever) creating the chaos was
replaced. So far in W7, it's only one BSOD, no signs of it repeating.

When I had XP and used to get BSOD's, I was particularly fond of a
freeware tool called BlueScreenView from NirSoft. Super useful, and
automated a manual debugging job down to a second that which would've
taken minutes if you had to do it by hand using the Microsoft debugging
tools.

Blue screen of death (STOP error) information in dump files.
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html

I haven't really had a chance to use Bluescreenview on a Windows 7
computer yet. So here's my first opportunity. BSV produced the following
saved report:

==================================================
Dump File : 070112-14586-01.dmp
Crash Time : 01/07/2012 12:06:55 PM
Bug Check String : DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug Check Code : 0x0000009f
Parameter 1 : 00000000`00000003
Parameter 2 : fffffa80`082464f0
Parameter 3 : fffff800`00b9c518
Parameter 4 : fffffa80`06c8eca0
Caused By Driver : ntoskrnl.exe
Caused By Address : ntoskrnl.exe+7f1c0
File Description : NT Kernel & System
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 6.1.7601.17835 (win7sp1_gdr.120503-2030)
Processor : x64
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\Windows\minidump\070112-14586-01.dmp
Processors Count : 6
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 7601
==================================================

So it turned out the culprit is the Windows kernel itself, and it's due
to a power state problem. And as usual, there is no fix to the problem
yet. Oh well, at least I got a chance to use it on Windows 7 finally. :)

Yousuf Khan
Power state problems can be hardware and/or BIOS related. Not to mention
the usual driver problems. As to blue screens, and one of my P/Cs,
AMD/ATI has improved video drivers to the point that blue screens due to
video hardware occur, rather than video timeouts. ????
The video cards show signs of overheat, even though the on card sensors
show temps well within specs.
 
D

Dave-UK

Yousuf Khan said:
Well you might find this strange, but I'm excited by this, in a geeky
way. One thing that I have not seen in a long time since installing
Windows 7 was a BSOD. Used to get them occasionally under XP. Actually
with XP, when I used to get them, then I'd get them regularly, maybe
once a day until the driver (or whatever) creating the chaos was
replaced. So far in W7, it's only one BSOD, no signs of it repeating.

When I had XP and used to get BSOD's, I was particularly fond of a
freeware tool called BlueScreenView from NirSoft. Super useful, and
automated a manual debugging job down to a second that which would've
taken minutes if you had to do it by hand using the Microsoft debugging
tools.

Blue screen of death (STOP error) information in dump files.
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html

I haven't really had a chance to use Bluescreenview on a Windows 7
computer yet. So here's my first opportunity.
As well as BlueScreenView there's also Who Crashed?
I've no idea if it's any good but as you've had a BSOD
you might want to try it. There's a free home edition:
http://www.resplendence.com/whocrashed
 
V

VanguardLH

Dave-UK said:
Yousuf Khan wrote ...


As well as BlueScreenView there's also Who Crashed? I've no idea if
it's any good but as you've had a BSOD you might want to try it.
There's a free home edition: http://www.resplendence.com/whocrashed
Their Who Crashed product page (linked above) says version 3.05;
however, their download page says version 3.04. The download files
themselves don't include a version number so you won't know which one
you got until after the installation and you run the program to go look
at its Help -> About menu.

As an aside on Resplendence, I found their Hook Analyzer a great tool to
find out which multiple process had all hooked into the same system
call. This was valuable to determine when multiple security products
were hooking into the same system call but wouldn't work together when
hooked together this way or had to be in a specific stack order in the
hooking. Alas, they dropped that product (hasn't been available as a
download from their web site for a long time) and I don't know of a good
equivalent. Luckily I still have it saved in a downloads archive.

By doing a Google site search for Hook Analyzer:

http://www.google.com/search?q="hook+analyzer"+resplendence

I found their hidden product description web page at:

http://www.resplendence.com/hookanalyzer/

I found their hidden web page. It's hidden because there are no
navigational links to it from their other web pages. The problem is
that their download link doesn't grab the file from that hidden web page
but goes to their download web page where Hook Analyzer isn't listed.

Hmm, maybe their Sanity Check product replaced Hook Analyzer. My
recollection of their Sanity Check program was that it prompted to make
registry changes for "better" use of Sanity Check but those changes
caused problems elsewhere. I did a quick check of Sanity Check in a
virtual machine. No handy at all for seeing which system routines or
calls have multiple handlers hooked into them.
 
V

VanguardLH

Yousuf said:
I haven't really had a chance to use Bluescreenview on a Windows 7
computer yet. So here's my first opportunity. BSV produced the
following saved report:

==================================================
Dump File : 070112-14586-01.dmp
Crash Time : 01/07/2012 12:06:55 PM
Bug Check String : DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE
Bug Check Code : 0x0000009f
...
==================================================

So it turned out the culprit is the Windows kernel itself, and it's
due to a power state problem. And as usual, there is no fix to the
problem yet.
You sure? I don't have a minidump around to test with BSV but, as I
recall, the "report" was based on which events you selected from the
table listed in their GUI app. You might've only had the top process
pre-selected and that's what you see in the report. Often I noticed the
culprit was lower in the stack, like a driver, so its crashed filtered
up through the others. As I recall, I had to select 3 or 4 of the
events listed by BSV and then do a report.

There is no "Report" selection in the toolbar menus. You select which
events to save (one, or more) and then store them as text into an output
file. There is a "File -> Save Selected Items" menu but there is no
"Report" menu anywhere. I suspect you only had one event selected in
BSV so that's what you copied here.

http://resplendence.com/whocrashed
"In case of a kernel error, most computers running Windows do not show a
blue screen unless they are configured to do so. Instead these systems
suddenly reboot without any notice."
 
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Y

Yousuf Khan

Have you sent the report + info to MS?
They should certainly have that.
Yup, they get sent up through the Windows reporting utility or whatever
it's called. They didn't have a fix for it on their site, just some
similar problems that I found on a separate search. They promised to get
back to me when they have a fix. ;)

Yousuf Khan
 
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Y

Yousuf Khan

You sure? I don't have a minidump around to test with BSV but, as I
recall, the "report" was based on which events you selected from the
table listed in their GUI app. You might've only had the top process
pre-selected and that's what you see in the report. Often I noticed the
culprit was lower in the stack, like a driver, so its crashed filtered
up through the others. As I recall, I had to select 3 or 4 of the
events listed by BSV and then do a report.
Yes, I'm sure, all of the previous stack pointers all point to
Microsoft-created DLL's too. The whole stack belongs to Microsoft for
the most part.

Yousuf Khan
 

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