eSata Not Seen


B

BeeJ

New Samsung P580 laptop.

Windows 7 Pro 64 bit

Plugged in a NexStar CX eSata box with a WD 2T drive.

Plugged in the eSata cable to the laptop.
Got the installing popup box. Successful!

Do not see drive in Win Explorer.

Unplugged the eSata cable and plugged in the USB cable.
Got the installing popup box. Successful!

Do not see the drive in Win Explorer.

Went to device manager for both connections and did see the WD drive there
as the second, as expected, drive. Show WD part number and as USB
connection or direct.

Attempted to update drivers thru device manager but said it had the latest.

Booted between each operation.

Went to NexStart website for drivers but found nothing useful.

How do I get my boat anchor working?
 
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B

BeeJ

Found that the drive is unallocated after going into Computer Management.
Sigh!

So now it wants to know if I want to
Convert To Dynamic
Convert To GPT

Create A Simple Partition

It looks like the sector size would be 8MBytes. Yikes! My small text
files would eat disk space.

Will format support compression?

I do not want a Dynamic part.
Will GPT be compatible with XP Pro?
What advantages of GPT?
Googled it but not understanding significance of GPT.

Multiple partitions would be OK but not necessary.

I plan to use this drive on Win 7 Pro via eSata and Win XP Pro via USB.

What is the best choice?
 
B

BeeJ

Went to Computer Management and found that the drive was not allocated.
Sigh!

Now it asks
Convert To Dynamic - no thank you
Convert To GPT - what is this. Googled but still confused.

Create A New Simple Volume

I plan to use the drive with Win 7 Pro 64 eSata and Win XP Pro USB
interfaces so it need to be compatible.

Looks like Simple Volume will have 8MByte sectors. My tiny text files
will eat disk space.

Which format is best?

What will support compression and be Win 7 and XP compatible?

Multiple partitions would be OK but not necessary.
 
T

Tim Slattery

BeeJ said:
Went to Computer Management and found that the drive was not allocated.
Sigh!

Now it asks
Convert To Dynamic - no thank you
Convert To GPT - what is this. Googled but still confused.

Create A New Simple Volume
How big is the disk? Disks larger than 2TB must use GUID partition
table (GPT), that's why it was invented. Otherwise use "simple
volume". That will probably create a traditional partition table.
I plan to use the drive with Win 7 Pro 64 eSata and Win XP Pro USB
interfaces so it need to be compatible.
Win7 should understand the GUID (although the BIOS might not). I have
a 3TB USB disk. Of course, it uses a GPT setup. When we plugged it in
the first time, it installed a driver so our XP and Vista machines
could use it. The odd thing is that the XP machine will boot with it
plugged in, but the Vista machine, which is newer, will not.
Apparently it sees the GUID table, can't figure it out, and stops
dead. Maybe the XP machine just ignores it when it can't figure it
out. Once into Windows, the driver is there and there's no problem.
Looks like Simple Volume will have 8MByte sectors. My tiny text files
will eat disk space.
That makes no sense to me. What do you see that's telling you that?
Post the exact message, please.

Once you finish this, you'll have to create partition.
 
P

Paul

BeeJ said:
Went to Computer Management and found that the drive was not allocated.
Sigh!

Now it asks
Convert To Dynamic - no thank you
Convert To GPT - what is this. Googled but still confused.

Create A New Simple Volume

I plan to use the drive with Win 7 Pro 64 eSata and Win XP Pro USB
interfaces so it need to be compatible.

Looks like Simple Volume will have 8MByte sectors. My tiny text files
will eat disk space.

Which format is best?

What will support compression and be Win 7 and XP compatible?

Multiple partitions would be OK but not necessary.
You say in your original post, it's a "2T" drive.

Up to "2.2T", you can treat the drive as an ordinary one.
"Create A New Simple Volume" sounds fine.

When you buy a 3T or 4T drive, come back and see us
for special instructions.

*******

GPT or GUID Partition Table, is a way to handle larger disks.

The support tables, about 2/3rds down the page, tell you which
OSes support that form of partitioning. Booting from GPT,
may require a motherboard with UEFI or EFI or something.
So it's not exactly easy to meet all the requirements, if
you're using a computer that's a few years old.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table

You don't have to use GPT with a 3T or 4T disk. The
disk companies offer a special driver, which converts
a large physical disk, into several "virtual" disks,
each disk being a fraction of the original size. So
a 3T physical disk, because 1T + 1T + 1T virtual
disks, each of which could have four partitions or
whatever on it. You would check the support page
for your purchased product, to see a listing of
options available for it. [ The special driver
is for internal disks, plugged into a motherboard
connector. Rather than for USB enclosure drives.
For USB, then GPT would be the option as far as
I know. ]

*******

Select Simple Volume.
Place a single partition on the disk and make it NTFS.
You can leave the cluster size at 4KB. You can
enable compression on the entire partition if you want,
but I'd only do that if you know you're going to need
the space that provides.

Say, for example, you use a backup tool which has its
own form of compression. If the NTFS also has compression
enabled, it's not going to help. It only slows things
down. Turning on NTFS compression makes sense, if
you know the content is compressible. If all the files
are text, then NTFS compression could give 2:1 or 3:1
lossless compression for you. If you had nothing but
Adobe Acrobat PDF documents (which are already partially
compressed), then the NTFS compression isn't going to
save very much.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTFS

"The following are a few limitations of NTFS:

Compression

The compression algorithms in NTFS are designed to
support cluster sizes of up to 4 kB. When the cluster
size is greater than 4 kB on an NTFS volume,
NTFS compression is not available.

Maximum cluster size
The maximum cluster size is 64 kB.
"

FAT32 is the one where the user is more likely to be
fooling around with cluster size.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat32#FAT32

"For the common sector size 512 /A:64K yields
128 sectors per cluster."

I think that's a 64K cluster.

If you wanted to make the 2T drive FAT32 for the whole
thing, you'd use this formatter. Since Disk Management
won't allow you to format it FAT32, you finish up with
Disk Management first (so you get a drive letter assigned),
then use this to actually format it (basically, a
"quick format").

http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm?fat32format.htm

It allows a user to adjust cluster size. But for a 2T
disk, I doubt there's any option there, if you were
to make the whole disk FAT32. Based on the example on
that web page, I think this would make 64K clusters
(128 sectors times 512 bytes per sector), on the disk.

fat32format -c128 f:

Don't use FAT32. The above information was only presented
for fun. Use NTFS.

While you have options on NTFS as well, for exotic cluster
sizes, generally all available features work with the default
4KB cluster size (perhaps compression and encryption, that
sort of thing). If you feel you'll be storing nothing but
big files, and a larger cluster is more efficient, then
forget about using the other features. As they'll be disabled.
My personal choice here, is to leave the default 4KB in
place. My new 2T, is one big NTFS with 4KB cluster.
One other poster here, has experimented with larger clusters.
I just don't want any headaches (since I have no where to
move the data off the disk, if it needs repair work).

HTH,
Paul
 
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B

BeeJ

2T stated.

When I partition the 2T drive as simple, the dialog says minimum is
8MBytes. But I realize now that it is telling me the minimum partition
size and not the sector size. If MS had captioned "Minimum Partition
Size" then I would not have been confused. Just me.
 
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