deleting update files


J

Jeff

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup files that
XP created after each windows critical update.

I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files in W 7?

Thanks, Jeff
 
V

Valorie *~

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup files that
XP created after each windows critical update.
Good for you, but you're not running XP anymore.
I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files in W 7?
Delete C:\Windows
 
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E

Ed Cryer

Good for you, but you're not running XP anymore.


Delete C:\Windows
Valorie, you are a devil.
In the Middle Ages people used to see things like you perching in the
rafters of churches and abbeys. While the faithful were offering their
hearts to the Lord and his beautiful creation, you were croaking your
impish scorn from above.
Later, of course, they saw aliens; and sometimes got abducted into
spaceships where the little slitty-eyed things performed operations on them.

They used to dip witches in the village pond with a ducking-stool;
sometimes they just burned them.

Ed
 
J

Jeff

Good for you, but you're not running XP anymore.


Delete C:\Windows
That is really not nice. Someone less knowledgeable would have followed
your advice and I cannot see what satisfaction that could possibly give
you.

Shame on you and grow up!
 
J

Jeff

Valorie, you are a devil.
In the Middle Ages people used to see things like you perching in the
rafters of churches and abbeys. While the faithful were offering their
hearts to the Lord and his beautiful creation, you were croaking your
impish scorn from above.
Later, of course, they saw aliens; and sometimes got abducted into
spaceships where the little slitty-eyed things performed operations on
them.

They used to dip witches in the village pond with a ducking-stool;
sometimes they just burned them.

Ed
I agree.

So where are these backup files kept in W7 after critical updates?
Jeff
 
R

relic

That is really not nice. Someone less knowledgeable would have followed
your advice and I cannot see what satisfaction that could possibly give
you.

Shame on you and grow up!
Her answer was correct.
 
C

Char Jackson

Her answer was correct.
1. That was the Valorie impersonator.**
2. The answer wasn't correct.

**The 'real' Valorie has been gone for awhile now. At some point, does
the impersonator take on 'real' status?
 
R

relic

Char Jackson said:
1. That was the Valorie impersonator.**
2. The answer wasn't correct.
If you delete C:\Windows, the update files are gone as the OP asked. What is
wrong about it?

It may not be your preferred method, but it will do the job.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

If you delete C:\Windows, the update files are gone as the OP asked. What is
wrong about it?

It may not be your preferred method, but it will do the job.
More precisely, it will do a job on the system. As in kill the system...

Is that what you wish to advise the OP?
 
J

Jeff

More precisely, it will do a job on the system. As in kill the system...

Is that what you wish to advise the OP?
Not to worry. I've been using computers since the Apple II days. I know
better. But it is juvenile and nasty. Both are on my blacklist.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Not to worry. I've been using computers since the Apple II days. I know
better. But it is juvenile and nasty. Both are on my blacklist.
But these people didn't necessarily know that "the OP" was
well-informed. Nor did I, come to think of it. So I criticize their
policy.

I'm glad you were unaffected, but I wish people wouldn't give advice
that could mess up a newbie. I see it as (metaphorical) vandalism.
 
T

Tester

Not to worry. I've been using computers since the Apple II days. I know
better. But it is juvenile and nasty. Both are on my blacklist.
But you should also know better that on these newsgroups you often get
nutters giving out flippant advice to make fun of users on these
newsgroups and of decent people like yourself.
 
R

relic

Gene E. Bloch said:
More precisely, it will do a job on the system. As in kill the system...

Is that what you wish to advise the OP?
You are aware that it won't allow anyone to do it, aren't you?
 
R

R. C. White

?Hi, Valorie - or whoever...

As relic finally points out, far down in this thread, this won't work.

No OS will obey the command to commit suicide - and that essentially is what
Delete C:\Windows would do - IF the command were obeyed. All of the
operating system files are in the Windows folder tree, so deletion of that
folder would delete the Windows installation on C:.

Even in MS-DOS days, if we wanted to delete the DOS installation that we
were running on the hard drive, we would need to reboot from another source,
such as a floppy disk to issue the command to Format C:. If we issued that
command while running DOS on C:, the command would be refused.

To delete the OS on C:, we must reboot from some other source, such as the
Win7 DVD, or boot into a different Windows installation on a multi-boot
system. Oh, and to remove a folder, we really should use the Remove
Directory (rd) command, rather than Delete.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-9/30/10)
Windows Live Mail Version 2011 (Build 15.4.3504.1109) in Win7 Ultimate x64
SP1 RC


"Valorie *~" wrote in message

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup files that
XP created after each windows critical update.
Good for you, but you're not running XP anymore.
I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files in W 7?
Delete C:\Windows
 
S

Stan Brown

More precisely, it will do a job on the system. As in kill the system...

Is that what you wish to advise the OP?
I am not willing to try it, but I suspect if you try to delete
C:\Windows, nothing will happen. Isn't that folder protected in
Windows 7?
 
C

Char Jackson

I am not willing to try it, but I suspect if you try to delete
C:\Windows, nothing will happen. Isn't that folder protected in
Windows 7?
Let us remember that the OP asked the following question:

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup
files that XP created after each windows critical update.
I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files
in W 7?

Assuming you CAN delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how does
that help the OP? It doesn't.

Assuming you CANNOT delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how
does that help the OP? It doesn't.

There's no way to spin relic's answer into a "correct" answer.
 
S

Stan Brown

Let us remember that the OP asked the following question:

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup
files that XP created after each windows critical update.
I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files
in W 7?

Assuming you CAN delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how does
that help the OP? It doesn't.

Assuming you CANNOT delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how
does that help the OP? It doesn't.

There's no way to spin relic's answer into a "correct" answer.
Well, of course it doesn't. I thought it was clear that I was
responding to the very specific point that I quoted, but I guess it
wasn't.

So, for the record: I do not advocate trying to delete C:\Windows,
not as a method of purging updates or for any other purpose.
 
E

Ed Cryer

?Hi, Valorie - or whoever...

As relic finally points out, far down in this thread, this won't work.

No OS will obey the command to commit suicide - and that essentially is
what Delete C:\Windows would do - IF the command were obeyed. All of the
operating system files are in the Windows folder tree, so deletion of
that folder would delete the Windows installation on C:.

Even in MS-DOS days, if we wanted to delete the DOS installation that we
were running on the hard drive, we would need to reboot from another
source, such as a floppy disk to issue the command to Format C:. If we
issued that command while running DOS on C:, the command would be refused.

To delete the OS on C:, we must reboot from some other source, such as
the Win7 DVD, or boot into a different Windows installation on a
multi-boot system. Oh, and to remove a folder, we really should use the
Remove Directory (rd) command, rather than Delete.

RC

Alright, so the OP tries to delete Windows and is told he can't do it.
He then asks a computer-literate friend of his "How do I delete
C:\Windows?". He says "Boot from a Linux live disc".
So, he gets a copy of Knoppix, boots from it, deletes the Windows
directory. It all works; he's feeling very proud of himself that he's
done all of that; and thankful for the advice of experts. And then he
tries to boot Windows....

Whom do you blame in that scenario? A naive computer-user? Or whom?

Ed
 
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C

chrisv

Char Jackson said:
Let us remember that the OP asked the following question:

When I used XP I used to intermittently delete all the backup
files that XP created after each windows critical update.
I would like to do the same in W 7 64 bit. Where are these files
in W 7?

Assuming you CAN delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how does
that help the OP? It doesn't.

Assuming you CANNOT delete the entire C:\Windows directory tree, how
does that help the OP? It doesn't.

There's no way to spin relic's answer into a "correct" answer.
In other words, you don't know. IF the updates are stored anywhere, the
would be removed by deleting the Windows directory. How does that make
Valorie *~'s answer incorrect (note, it was her, not relic, that gave that
reply).

Instead of troll posts like you made, why don't you attempt to answer the
OP's question?
 

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