SOLVED can you over clock a CPU with a locked multiplier


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i was just wondering if you could overclock a cpu with a locked multiplier?
 
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Overclocking a CPU is a dangerous job.You could end up with a fried CPU,sometimes the motherboard will also be fried.
Sometimes the BIOS itself may become corrupted which is more dangerous
If you are very confident that nothing could go wrong,do it your self.

I don't know about locked mutipliers and things because i stoped overclocking because i fried my CPU overclocking in 2009.I had to replace everything except the Hard disk and DVD drive
 

Digerati

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i was just wondering if you could overclock a cpu with a locked multiplier?
It depends on the specific CPU, but generally the answer is no, you cannot overclock the CPU directly. However, there are often other means to overclock the computer, such as increasing bus speeds.

That said, I am not a fan of overclocking either. It is typically done for bragging rights, not to increase a user's productivity. In the vast majority of the cases, any performance gains are noticed only by the benchmarking programs, not the user (except by placebo effect). Even with games. Remember, game makers know most gamers don't have overclocked screamers - so they code to provide good "game play" on lessor systems.

So I am not a fan for the reasons amaltom61 provided, but also because most overclockers do not do enough (if any) homework first. I say most - you, Pc Geek, are asking questions! :beer:

Typical failings seen in the shop include:
  • Failure to properly address the added cooling demands overclocking puts on the other motherboard devices, in addition to the CPU,
  • Failure to consider the added demands on the PSU,
  • Failure to monitor (in real-time) the inevitable increased temperatures,
  • Failure to keep the interior free of heat trapping dust (a common problem, but a greater issue with OC'ed systems),
  • Failure to learn the CPU warranty consequences of overclocking (or the use of alternative cooling),
  • Using a overclocked machine for work or school projects, personal business, email, banking, etc. (see next point),
  • Failure to have a viable backup plan in place, and a current backup on hand. Essential for when the overclocked system becomes unstable, hard crashes, and corrupts the drive and data on it. :(
Am I against, over clocking? No! Absolutely not! It can be fun and an excellent learning experience in how motherboards moves data about, cooling, power, and more.

Years ago, when self-built computers were still just for electronics enthusiasts, we used to "push" (as we called it then) our clock speeds but you had to set jumpers on the motherboard - by soldering a wire jumper to various points on the board! That was a bit nerve-racking - but fun. Thinking about that makes me feel even older than I am. :( Oh well, the good ol' days.

Anyway, understand, overclocking is a pretty much a marketing gimmick, not a design feature. Engineers design to the specifications in the design proposal using common practice design methods. Or (if they have lots of money) they design to the limits the raw materials, construction techniques, and the Laws of Physic allow. The engineers do not build in overclocking. Some "overhead" - always, if possible. But "overhead" is not meant to be eaten up by overclocking.

Overhead is there to compensate for aging electronics, power anomalies, and other "tolerance imperfections". And until Man can create perfection 100% of the time, there will always be tolerance imperfections that cause real-world and theory to never exactly mesh. Yet, marketing weenies market the overhead as OC capabilities. :( And, worse, IMO, often "dummy down" specs so they can market the OC capabilities even more. :mad:

BUT!!!! :mad: :mad: Regardless how easy makers (CPU and motherboards) make overclocking, any damage while overclocking is NOT covered under any warranty! In fact, both Intel and AMD warranties state the CPUs MUST be run at specified voltages - and, if a boxed retail CPU, with the "supplied" OEM cooling solution too! Or else the warranty is void.

So my advice, if you want more power, buy it. If you are intent on overclocking, do extensive homework. Ensure your case can provide the necessary cooling and your PSU is 80+ certified from a reputable maker, and with ample wattage for the task. Use a good motherboard from a major maker. It does not have to be their high-end stuff, but stay away from the budget models if OCing.

Gigabyte, my preferred brand, provides some preset overclocking options through their EasyTune6 program. Some of the other major board makers provide such utilities too. If overclocking is pursued, I think it better to use one of the provided presets (but no extremes) than dinking with timings yourself - unless you have a total understanding of CPU, motherboard and RAM timings, AND total understanding and control and of thermal management.

Sorry - didn't mean to rant. But as a hardware guy, I am tired of marketing weenies manipulating specs, and being so deeply involved in the final "tuning" of products.
 
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Thanks for all the info so ill stay away from overclocking and when ive done lots of homework on it i might do it to my old Intel pentium G620.

thanks for your help!
 

yodap

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Hey Digerati, look at this.
An unusual move for Intel to offer extended warranties to overclockers for the unlocked chips only. (for a price of course) This has been available for a few months now.
I'm not planning to invest in these plans because I'm a medium oc'er at best myself but I found it interesting.

http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/Terms.aspx

Exclusions to Coverage. This Plan does NOT cover:

  • Any costs associated with the removal of the Eligible Processor and/or installation of the replacement, including without limitation, labor, damages to the system, downtime, or any consequential costs incurred by you, and in particular, any costs related to the removal or replacement of any Eligible Processor that is soldered or otherwise permanently affixed to any printed circuit board; OR
  • Damage to the Eligible Processor due to external causes, including accident, problems with electrical power, abnormal electrical, mechanical or environmental conditions, usage not in accordance with product instructions, misuse, neglect, alteration, repair, improper installation, or improper testing; OR
  • Any Eligible Processor which has been modified or where the original proprietary markings (trademark, logo or serial number) have been removed, altered or obliterated from the Eligible Processor; OR
  • Damage to any other component(s) within the system housing the Eligible Processor or the replacement processor.
 

Digerati

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I saw that and noted it really does not change anything - except the length of coverage.

Note the following exclusion:

usage not in accordance with product instructions
That says it all because the product instructions say to use the "accompanying" thermal solution and to use the product with voltages specified in the product's published datasheets.

The "Plan" also stipulates "Intel's standard boxed processors" - and the vast majority of Intel "boxed" CPU come with supplied OEM coolers. So again, to avoid voiding the warranty, you still need to use the accompanying OEM cooler, and run the CPU at published (not overclocked) settings.
 

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