C: drive full

My c: drive is to small I need to move operating system to d: drive can I do this without rebuild

  • The drives are partitioned

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  • Updates take up most of storage

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Hello Billy, you don't have to move OS to D drive. This may lead to system crash. Instead, as long as there's enough free space on other drives, you can use them to extend C drive easily. But with Windows built-in Disk Management, if you want to increase the size of C drive, you can only use the unallocated space next to it and just on the right side. So try some third-party software like AOMEI Partition Assistant, etc. It's soooo handy to extend partition in Windows 7 without data loss and reboot.
 
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There is one more way you can try to save some space on C Drive, by turning off Hibernation. Follow the steps this can help you.

Click Start, and then type cmd in the Start Search box.
In the search results list, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as Administrator.
When you are prompted by User Account Control, click Continue.
At the command prompt, type powercfg.exe /hibernate off, and then press Enter.
Type exit, and then press Enter to close the Command Prompt window.
 
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Hello Billy
Could you post a screenshot of your Disk Management for us to know more of your issue? Actually, there is no need to migrate OS to another partition in most cases, just extend C drive.
 
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First thing you need to do is connect both hard drives to the computer. Make sure you have enough a spare power connector and SATA data cable as you need those to connect the new hard drive.

If you don't, you may use existing cables instead, for instance by disconnecting an optical drive temporarily (works only if you don't plan to use the old drive as well).

Install and run Macrium Reflect afterwards.

Macrium Reflect Free displays all drives in its interface on start. If that is not the case for you, make sure the Disk Image tab is activated.

Select the hard drive that you want to clone. The main hard drive with Windows is listed with a small Windows-icon in front of its name and drive letter.

You find the "clone this disk" option below the drive once it has been selected. This copies all contents of that drive to the destination drive.

Click on "select a disk to clone to" on the next screen, and pick the new drive. You need to make sure you don't pick a drive that is already in use as all contents of it will be overwritten during the process.

Make sure you adjust the size of the cloned partition in the next step. This is especially important if the destination is larger than the source. If you don't do that, you end up with a single partition that contains the cloned data of the source drive, and unused disk space that you need to partition and format. One easy way of making the right adjustment here is to click on the "maximum size" button.

Macrium Reflect will then start the cloning process which it does while Windows is running. This process will take around 20 to 30 minutes to clone the old HDD to the new Hard Drive.

One easy way to check that the operation completed successfully is to restart the PC and change the boot order in BIOS/UEFI.

Select the new drive as the first boot device and check if Windows loads fine.

If that is the case you may disconnect the old drive or use it for storage purposes.
 

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