Win7 Partition


J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Ken Springer said:
On 6/11/13 12:16 PM, Ken Blake wrote: []
See Paul's reply, and let me add the following: what do you mean by
"too large"? How big is it, what do you think is wrong with that size
and why do you think it would be better to be smaller?
[]
How about the following for a reason, copied from Windows 7 Inside and
Out, Microsoft Press...

**********************

Although the organizational scheme that Windows has adopted for
personal data folders— the 11 visible subfolders of %UserProfile%
(see Figure 8-5 on page 275)—is suitable for many users, the scheme
has one potential defect: it combines data and system files on the same
physical volume . For a variety of reasons, some users prefer to
separate their documents and other profile data . These reasons might
include the following:
? Large collections of data, particular digital media
files, have a way of overwhelming the available space on system
volumes, eventually necessitating their removal and relocation to a
separate, larger volume.
? Separating data from system files makes restoration
easier in the event of system corruption (for example, by malware).
? Separation reduces the size and time devoted to image
backups, encouraging their regular use.
? Separation can make it easier, when the time comes,
to upgrade the operating system.
In earlier versions of the operating system, we routinely recommended
that users accomplish this separation by relocating their user profile
subfolders . In Windows 7, an alternative makes equally good sense:
store personal data in folders on a separate volume, and then include
those folders in your libraries . (For information about using
libraries, see “Working with Libraries†on page 282 .) This
approach leaves you with a default set of profile folders, which you
can still use when it’s convenient to do so, but it keeps the bulk of
your personal information in a separate place .

***********************

Bullets #2 & 4 is why I do it.
They're all good points (I think I'd add #3 to my own reasons, though
even #1 is a good point too).

Given the above, even from Microsoft, I find it galling that the default
- mainly in the setup from Microsoft, but followed by many third parties
- is still to make one big partition, and to use somewhere on C: as the
default data location.
 
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R

Rob

How about the following for a reason, copied from Windows 7 Inside and
Out, Microsoft Press...

**********************

Although the organizational scheme that Windows has adopted for personal
data folders— the 11 visible subfolders of %UserProfile% (see Figure 8-5
on page 275)—is suitable for many users, the scheme has one potential
defect: it combines data and system files on the same physical volume .
For a variety of reasons, some users prefer to separate their documents
and other profile data . These reasons might include the following:
â— Large collections of data, particular digital media files,
have a way of overwhelming the available space on system volumes,
eventually necessitating their removal and relocation to a separate,
larger volume.
â— Separating data from system files makes restoration easier
in the event of system corruption (for example, by malware).
â— Separation reduces the size and time devoted to image
backups, encouraging their regular use.
â— Separation can make it easier, when the time comes, to
upgrade the operating system.
In earlier versions of the operating system, we routinely recommended
that users accomplish this separation by relocating their user profile
subfolders . In Windows 7, an alternative makes equally good sense:
store personal data in folders on a separate volume, and then include
those folders in your libraries . (For information about using
libraries, see “Working with Libraries†on page 282 .) This approach
leaves you with a default set of profile folders, which you can still
use when it’s convenient to do so, but it keeps the bulk of your
personal information in a separate place .

***********************

Bullets #2 & 4 is why I do it.
That quote is the first reasonable justification I've seen for the
introduction of libraries into Windows.
 
W

Wolf K

Ken Springer said:
On 6/11/13 12:16 PM, Ken Blake wrote: []
See Paul's reply, and let me add the following: what do you mean by
"too large"? How big is it, what do you think is wrong with that size
and why do you think it would be better to be smaller?
[]
How about the following for a reason, copied from Windows 7 Inside and
Out, Microsoft Press...

**********************

Although the organizational scheme that Windows has adopted for
personal data folders— the 11 visible subfolders of %UserProfile% (see
Figure 8-5 on page 275)—is suitable for many users, the schemehas one
potential defect: it combines data and system files on the same
physical volume . For a variety of reasons, some users prefer to
separate their documents and other profile data . These reasons might
include the following:
? Large collections of data, particular digital media
files, have a way of overwhelming the available space on system
volumes, eventually necessitating their removal and relocation to a
separate, larger volume.
? Separating data from system files makes restoration
easier in the event of system corruption (for example, by malware).
? Separation reduces the size and time devoted to image
backups, encouraging their regular use.
? Separation can make it easier, when the time comes,
to upgrade the operating system.
In earlier versions of the operating system, we routinely recommended
that users accomplish this separation by relocating their user profile
subfolders . In Windows 7, an alternative makes equally good sense:
store personal data in folders on a separate volume, and then include
those folders in your libraries . (For information about using
libraries, see “Working with Libraries†on page 282 .)This approach
leaves you with a default set of profile folders, which you can still
use when it’s convenient to do so, but it keeps the bulk of your
personal information in a separate place .

***********************

Bullets #2 & 4 is why I do it.
They're all good points (I think I'd add #3 to my own reasons, though
even #1 is a good point too).

Given the above, even from Microsoft, I find it galling that the default
- mainly in the setup from Microsoft, but followed by many third parties
- is still to make one big partition, and to use somewhere on C: as the
default data location.
Considering how cheap HDD have become, it's past time to for desktops to
have two by deafult, and for laptops to have an SSD for the system and a
HDD for data.

Have a good day,
 
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K

Ken Springer

That quote is the first reasonable justification I've seen for the
introduction of libraries into Windows.
I don't want to drag this thread off topic, but I don't see what I
posted as a justification for Libraries at all. Can you do a simple
explanation as how you see it? If you want to get somewhat detailed,
let's do it in a new thread.

FWIW, with a bit of work, you can duplicate the Libraries function in
any version of Windows, as far back and including Windows for Workgroups.

--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.4
Firefox 20.0
Thunderbird 17.0.5
LibreOffice 4.0.3.3
 

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