USB Wireless Keyboard stopped working until full boot.


A

Allen Drake

For some reason still unknown to me my MS USB wireless keyboard no
longer works until by system is fully loaded. I used to be able to use
it to select which OS in dual boot. I have made no changes and done
nothing but spend moments each morning reading email now out of the
blue this occurs. I replaced batteries but only when I use my old
wired KB am I able to get action.

Anyone have any ideas on this one?

Thanks.

Al.
 
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S

Sunny Bard

Allen said:
my MS USB wireless keyboard no
longer works until by system is fully loaded. I used to be able to use
it to select which OS in dual boot. I have made no changes
Sure you haven't changed the "Legacy USB/PS2 Emlation" setting (or
similar name) in the BIOS?
 
A

Allen Drake

Sure you haven't changed the "Legacy USB/PS2 Emlation" setting (or
similar name) in the BIOS?
I am sure I have not done that. I would remember entering BIOS over
anything else but I have only a few minutes each day during the week
to get off for my 12 hour day in the workforce. I will check if I know
what exactly to look for.

Thanks for the tip.

Al.
 
P

Paul

Allen said:
I am sure I have not done that. I would remember entering BIOS over
anything else but I have only a few minutes each day during the week
to get off for my 12 hour day in the workforce. I will check if I know
what exactly to look for.

Thanks for the tip.

Al.
If the CR2032 BIOS battery expired lately, your clock lost time
while the computer was shut off, and you installed a new battery,
that can reset previous BIOS changes. In which case, reviewing the
BIOS settings and correcting them, would be necessary.

There are only a few motherboards, that support "profiles". On
those motherboards, you can enter the BIOS and "reload from stored
profile" after changing a battery, and then all the settings are
put back. (For all of my motherboards, writing down the
settings on paper, or taking digital camera pictures of the
BIOS settings, are the only "profile" provided :-( )

There are even Asus motherboards, that when they report "overclocking
failure" at POST, it causes the BIOS settings to be reset. And the
older motherboards, reset way more settings than they should. Modern
motherboards only correct CPU or memory clock, to make the system
stable enough to start, and then there isn't as much collateral damage.
And a declaration of "overclocking failure" can occur, even on
systems running at stock speed. All it really means is, the system
crashed at some point in time, the BIOS detected this lack of stability,
and reset the BIOS settings in the hopes of making the computer
more stable.

So there are ways, for a BIOS setting to change.

Paul
 
E

Ed Cryer

If the CR2032 BIOS battery expired lately, your clock lost time
while the computer was shut off, and you installed a new battery,
that can reset previous BIOS changes. In which case, reviewing the
BIOS settings and correcting them, would be necessary.

There are only a few motherboards, that support "profiles". On
those motherboards, you can enter the BIOS and "reload from stored
profile" after changing a battery, and then all the settings are
put back. (For all of my motherboards, writing down the
settings on paper, or taking digital camera pictures of the
BIOS settings, are the only "profile" provided :-( )

There are even Asus motherboards, that when they report "overclocking
failure" at POST, it causes the BIOS settings to be reset. And the
older motherboards, reset way more settings than they should. Modern
motherboards only correct CPU or memory clock, to make the system
stable enough to start, and then there isn't as much collateral damage.
And a declaration of "overclocking failure" can occur, even on
systems running at stock speed. All it really means is, the system
crashed at some point in time, the BIOS detected this lack of stability,
and reset the BIOS settings in the hopes of making the computer
more stable.

So there are ways, for a BIOS setting to change.

Paul
I've seen things like that happen. You don't get a warning about the
CMOS battery, but you can check its charge value usually from within
BIOS itself.
The way most people find out that it's on the blink is after the sytem
time goes awry two or three times.

Ed
 
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A

Allen Drake

If the CR2032 BIOS battery expired lately, your clock lost time
while the computer was shut off, and you installed a new battery,
that can reset previous BIOS changes. In which case, reviewing the
BIOS settings and correcting them, would be necessary.

There are only a few motherboards, that support "profiles". On
those motherboards, you can enter the BIOS and "reload from stored
profile" after changing a battery, and then all the settings are
put back. (For all of my motherboards, writing down the
settings on paper, or taking digital camera pictures of the
BIOS settings, are the only "profile" provided :-( )

There are even Asus motherboards, that when they report "overclocking
failure" at POST, it causes the BIOS settings to be reset. And the
older motherboards, reset way more settings than they should. Modern
motherboards only correct CPU or memory clock, to make the system
stable enough to start, and then there isn't as much collateral damage.
And a declaration of "overclocking failure" can occur, even on
systems running at stock speed. All it really means is, the system
crashed at some point in time, the BIOS detected this lack of stability,
and reset the BIOS settings in the hopes of making the computer
more stable.

So there are ways, for a BIOS setting to change.

Paul

Ok, I just discovered that the wireless keyboard must work because I
was able to get into BOLS by hitting the delete key. I didn't check
anything this time. It seems that the dual boot application will not
take any input from these wireless keyboards. If I connect the wired
KB everything seems normal. I tried other wireless KBs and all act
defective when it comes to BCDedit. Maybe I have to reinstall BCDedit.
 
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