Reasons why 128bit might flop


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Core

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I'm just relieved we're finally doing away with floppy drives.
 
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It will be awhile before we see many devices that will transfer at USB 3.0 max transfer rates.

USB 2.0 is a specification not an absolute rate. Different devices will transfer at different rates. USB 3.0 is now a specification because devices was exceeding Max transfer for the USB 2.0 specification rates.

XP does support a floppy drive. The introduction to USB was why systems was shipped without floppy drives. If you need a floppy drive, purchase one and install it.
XP does support floppy drives. You just have to put it on a machine that has a floppy in it which would be an older machine. I have had XP installed on IBM Thinkpads T21,T23, Dell C640 all with Floppy Disk and even a Gateway Solo 9550 with Super Floppy...Not a problem.

I also disagree that USB was the reason that they stopped putting Floppy drives on machines. The initial USB 1.0 machines could not boot from USB. It was more so the fact that CD roms became bootable and vendors began to create bootable media and did not need to boot from floppy.

Eunix
 
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Q: what exactly do you mean by 128 bit processor or for GP use? This could mean a lot of things and in many cases an advertized 128-bit processor (Sony Playstation 3) on really works in a 64-bit address range.

Please clarify a bit.

Thanks,
 
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The USB stick (Thumb drive) is equally significant when it comes to floppies dying. Bootable media was a small percentage compared to data storage. However they both held a part in killing the floppy drive. And in your defense, as long as we continue needing a floppy boot image to make a CD/DVD boot, the floppy will never die.
 
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Nibiru2012

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I still use a floppy drive, very limited, but I still use one. I know that's sounds archaic, but I could never get a damn CD to burn as a bootable DOS disk, regardless of what method, procedure or program I used.

I figured I was either jinxed on this or the alien implant was causing issues.
 

Veedaz

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There are occasion's when i do need to use a Floppy Drive so i have one of these just plug it in :) >

 

catilley1092

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There are occasion's when i do need to use a Floppy Drive so i have one of these just plug it in :) >

They make DVD ROM's that plugs in like that, too. I've had a computer (Optiplex 280) with a floppy drive, but never used it.
 

catilley1092

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Yes, one of those. I came close to buying one last year when my DVD player acted up on me. It was a codec issue. I still may buy one, because you never know when you may need it.
 
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Veedaz

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I do have one but its old now so this may well be my next purchase as there are quite a few Note Books etc that don't have an Optical Drive.
 
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The USB stick (Thumb drive) is equally significant when it comes to floppies dying. Bootable media was a small percentage compared to data storage. However they both held a part in killing the floppy drive. And in your defense, as long as we continue needing a floppy boot image to make a CD/DVD boot, the floppy will never die.
I agree that capacity was a big part of it and the reliability of the media.

That is why I keep my old Apple II floppy disk and Apple IIe computers in a hermetically sealed box until I someone creates a CDROM or USB interface for that old great stuff!

Eunix
 
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The USB stick (Thumb drive) is equally significant when it comes to floppies dying. Bootable media was a small percentage compared to data storage. However they both held a part in killing the floppy drive. And in your defense, as long as we continue needing a floppy boot image to make a CD/DVD boot, the floppy will never die.
Remember USB Drives are soon to be 126 MB whereas Floppy was 1.44MB
 
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Coco I wouldn't purchase a 128MB thumb drive. They are too small. I know what you meant to say. And yes I know that the thumb drives are close to being 128GB in size. The floppy has been dying for many years, so the 128GB drives really do not have anything to do with the topic.

Any other thought's on the 128-Bit OS?
 
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As soon as Windows 8 comes out it will flop. See this:

Windows ME (Rubbish)
Windows XP (Great)
Windows Vista (Rubbish)
Windows 7 (Great)
Windows 8 = (Rubbish)
 
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Nibiru2012

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As soon as Windows 8 comes out it will flop. See this:

Windows ME (Rubbish)
Windows XP (Great)
Windows Vista (Rubbish)
Windows 7 (Great)
Windows 8 = (Rubbish)
You're making a crass generalization here.

I don't believe it's M$ plan to alternate OS releases in the manner you have laid out. It just happened that way.

Microsoft learned some extremely valuable lessons with the much belated release of Vista and decided to change all of that with the development and release of Windows 7.

  • Release the "betas" to the general public and garner as much feedback as possible.
  • Release the "beta" versions to the hardware and software developers as early as possible so that drivers and programs may be tweaked to the Windows 7 OS.
  • Offer extreme discounts on pre-orders to the "early adopters" back in late winter and early spring of 2009.
  • Be more low key and continue to tweak and improve the coding in the OS, as noted by the numerous releases there were over the space of less than a year.
I personally think that Windows 8 will be another milestone for M$. We can only wait and see at this time. I do sincerely believe that x86 hardware will no longer be supported though. (Psst.... that's 32 bit.)
 

Core

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As soon as Windows 8 comes out it will flop. See this:

Windows ME (Rubbish)
Windows XP (Great)
Windows Vista (Rubbish)
Windows 7 (Great)
Windows 8 = (Rubbish)
You conveniently left out Windows 2000, which was terrific
 

catilley1092

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You conveniently left out Windows 2000, which was terrific
Win 2K Pro was the best OS that I had, prior to Windows 7. I still run it on my laptop. It is a bit of a RAM hog, but otherwise a near perfect OS in it's time. I wished they would drop XP this August instead of Win 2K, and keep it going until 2014. A simple to use OS, yet a coveted OS for business professionals. In fact, that group is who it was developed for.
 
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catilley1092

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As soon as Windows 8 comes out it will flop. See this:

Windows ME (Rubbish)
Windows XP (Great)
Windows Vista (Rubbish)
Windows 7 (Great)
Windows 8 = (Rubbish)
I wouldn't be too concerned about the past when it comes to Microsoft's OS development. They have learned from their past mistakes, and are not going to rush one through, like with Me and Vista. We are on a stable platform now, there's no need to rush anything through. Any further releases will be throughly tested prior to release. PS: As Core said, you left out Win 2K Pro.
 
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