Readyboost


spearace

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Does anyone actually use readyboost on their computer, and have you noticed a difference in performance when using a fast USB drive as extra cache?

I have lots of USB drives around my room, but I don't bother using them in readyboost mode. Do you think I'd notice an improvement in performance if I used one?
 
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Ian

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I did use it with Vista for quite some time, but only because I use my USB drive as one of my backup devices and leave it plugged in a lot. I didn't notice a huge difference with my 2GB of main memory, but on my other halfs older PC with 1GB of ram there was a small improvement :)
 
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Does anyone actually use readyboost on their computer, and have you noticed a difference in performance when using a fast USB drive as extra cache?

I have lots of USB drives around my room, but I don't bother using them in readyboost mode. Do you think I'd notice an improvement in performance if I used one?
I do actually, I know it has been said that past 2GB of RAM you don't see a big improvement, but that's a lie for obvious reasons. Your RAM doesn't write your HD's cache, your HD does... therefore the extra boost from the FlashDrive improves no matter what RAM you have.

I have 8GB of RAM, and I only just put a 2GB FlashDrive in for ReadyBoost, and It cut my load time for Photoshop CS3 from 4 seconds down to 2 seconds. Browsers and folders open literally instantly. Even google earth opened in half the time (from 5 seconds down to 2.5 seconds) And this is just a measly 2GB FD plugged into my keyboard lol. I wanted a few bigger ones for work anyways, so I am definately going to use a larger one for ReadyBoost.
 

clifford_cooley

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Quick question - Is ReadyBoost still limited to 4GB because of the Fat32 File size limitation?

And if 2GB readyboost helps a 8GB memory system - Whats all the talk about readyboost being 1.5 times your system memory?
 
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Readyboost can help a computer run Vista with 512mb RAM, but considering 7 has so much less overhead I'd think there would be no need for it to even exist in 7.

After 1gb of RAM or so, ReadyBoost will only decrease performance.

^^ Clifford: Just reformat your flash drive in NTFS. I believe XP and on would only format in NTFS but in 2000 you could pick FAT32 or NTFS, but I might be getting this backwards. I know that I had some flash drives that I first formatted in NTFS -- on a Windows 2000 machine and had no trouble.

If you can't get it to format in NTFS from the window, try using the command prompt, I bet that would do it.

But I do believe FAT32 goes up to something like 64gb, where FAT16 goes up to 2gb, if memory serves me right.
 

clifford_cooley

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But I do believe FAT32 goes up to something like 64gb, where FAT16 goes up to 2gb, if memory serves me right.
Thanks fps_dean for the post but thats not the problem - The problem is the max file size under fat32 - The max file size is 4GB - ReadyBoost uses a file much like the pagefile on C:\ - The only way around this is for readyboost to use more than one file or use a NTFS file system on the USB stick. I was wondering if someone has already looked this up to see if the limitation still exist under Windows 7
 
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Thanks fps_dean for the post but thats not the problem - The problem is the max file size under fat32 - The max file size is 4GB - ReadyBoost uses a file much like the pagefile on C:\ - The only way around this is for readyboost to use more than one file or use a NTFS file system on the USB stick. I was wondering if someone has already looked this up to see if the limitation still exist under Windows 7
Oh yeah I completely forgot about that. However, if you format FAT32, then that will always be a problem regardless of what OS that you use. In this day in age, with more and more NT based Windows (98 is pretty much dead), Microsoft can assume everyone can read NTFS, so I would not see them finding a way around it -- it's just not worth the time spent.

The easiest way to tell is throw a flash drive in there and see if it tries to create multiple files on the flash drive.

Another reason I would guess not would be writing 2 files in parallel to a USB flash drive is most often much slower than writing them sequentially...
 

clifford_cooley

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Hi guys:ciao: I found my answer and wanted to share it with you

The updated Readyboost in Windows 7 will see several advancements. The 4 Gigabyte restriction will be lifted which essentially means that flash drives with larger capacities can then be used as additional cache. The limit to one Readyboost device has also been removed which gives users the possibility to use multiple flash drives as additional caches in Windows 7

This post was found here http://geeks.pirillo.com/forum/topics/windows-7-to-extend-readyboost
 
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While I really don't see the point of doing all those changes for no benefit (remember how slow usb drive access is, and how long it would take to write over 4gb), that is interesting to know.
 

Kougar

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Readyboost should help some of those poorly equipped netbooks and laptops, but that'd be the only time I'd ever recommend it. As many have said it can generally have a negative performance impact on a moderate to high-end desktop that has 2GB or more of RAM.

USB 2.0 flash drives are limited to 35MB/s read speeds at best, but most do not even come close to this best case scenario. By comparison any modern off-the-shelf desktop hard drive will reach 80-100MB/s or still more by using the outer edges of the disc (ie mostly empty). Either way, the speeds of RAM can typically be anywhere from 7,000 to 20,000MB/s to put those numbers into perspective.
 
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Readyboost should help some of those poorly equipped netbooks and laptops, but that'd be the only time I'd ever recommend it. As many have said it can generally have a negative performance impact on a moderate to high-end desktop that has 2GB or more of RAM.

USB 2.0 flash drives are limited to 35MB/s read speeds at best, but most do not even come close to this best case scenario. By comparison any modern off-the-shelf desktop hard drive will reach 80-100MB/s or still more by using the outer edges of the disc (ie mostly empty). Either way, the speeds of RAM can typically be anywhere from 7,000 to 20,000MB/s to put those numbers into perspective.
That's why you need Vista and 512mb of RAM to see some extremely small performance boost with ReadyBoost... now in Windows 7, because it uses less RAM, I would not be surprised if Readyboost only improves performance with 256mb RAM, if you can boot the OS on that -- I think you can.
 
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clifford_cooley

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If I am not mistaken - Its not about what the system requires - Its about how much memory you need - For example which progams do you use - Every program uses different amounts of memory - Next would be how many programs you use at one time - The more programs you have open at one time the more memory you need

The question here is whether ReadyBoost will help performance after all your apps are loaded. I think some will see a difference and some will not. It depends on the load that you put on the system.
 
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If I am not mistaken - Its not about what the system requires - Its about how much memory you need - For example which progams do you use - Every program uses different amounts of memory - Next would be how many programs you use at one time - The more programs you have open at one time the more memory you need

The question here is whether ReadyBoost will help performance after all your apps are loaded. I think some will see a difference and some will not. It depends on the load that you put on the system.
That is correct to some extent, but keep in mind that for Readyboost to be effective, you need a very small amount of RAM available after swapping out whatever is swappable in memory. Eventually there comes a point where you have enough RAM that due to the incredibly slow sustained (and even burst) speed of USB2 flash drives (even USB2 in general), it will actually decrease performance.

You're better off getting more RAM or turning off superfetch if you have 1.5gb or more of memory in Vista or probably 1gb in Windows 7, because 7 wastes a whole lot less memory than Vista does and from my experience, 7 also doesn't have any memory leaks.
 

BetaMan

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I always thought the thought of using a flash drive for RAM was awesome, but of course, nothing's like real, hard, RAM...



200TH POST!!! WOOT WOOT!
 
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Is there any way to convert a portable Pata laptop Hdd to ready boost? or even a old pata hdd to ready boost form a external enclosure???


If so what kind of performance would that bring? considering I have 3 gigs ram I could put a 20G laptop or 20G desktop in ?

and form what I understand is that ready boost is like virtual memory, so all it really will do is free up the search speed on Hdd's and use the usb drive as virtual memory correct?
I feel if the USB ports could be better then 100Mbs transfer it would be usefull.


so what about firewaire connection ?? a constant speed of data transfer that is only limited by the device you are using?
 

clifford_cooley

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Is there any way to convert a portable Pata laptop Hdd to ready boost? or even a old pata hdd to ready boost form a external enclosure???
No there is not - It would be defeating the purpose using media with the same speed of your primary HD

If so what kind of performance would that bring? considering I have 3 gigs ram I could put a 20G laptop or 20G desktop in?
Chances are with 3GB of ram you wouldnt notice any performance gain unless you have a really slow primary HD

and form what I understand is that ready boost is like virtual memory, so all it really will do is free up the search speed on Hdd's and use the usb drive as virtual memory correct?
First the only performance gain a usb stick has over HD is seek time
Second even all the usb sticks dont qualify for ReadyBoost
Third the only way you will have a performance gain is to use a media faster than your primary HD


I feel if the USB ports could be better then 100Mbs transfer it would be usefull.
They are working on a USB3.0 standard

so what about firewaire connection ?? a constant speed of data transfer that is only limited by the device you are using?
Firewire does have a max speed just like USB - In fact its fairly close to the same speed - Hence the term "Firewire 400" or "Firewire 800"
 
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No there is not - It would be defeating the purpose using media with the same speed of your primary HD


Chances are with 3GB of ram you wouldnt notice any performance gain unless you have a really slow primary HD


First the only performance gain a usb stick has over HD is seek time
Second even all the usb sticks dont qualify for ReadyBoost
Third the only way you will have a performance gain is to use a media faster than your primary HD



They are working on a USB3.0 standard


Firewire does have a max speed just like USB - In fact its fairly close to the same speed - Hence the term "Firewire 400" or "Firewire 800"
Thanks for the info, I used a 2g pny flash that the case fell off of and I have seen a great performance with W7. my UI is responcive and cuts load times in half to even 3/4 and I already have 3G 667 ddr2 Cosair gamming ram installed. also I noticed while playing wow on my machine that using ram heavy ad-ons that the latency and drag on my ram is relived?

Personally I am thinking of getting a 6G stick if I do go get one which would be best to get a regular flash drive or a u3 flash drive ?
 

clifford_cooley

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Personally I am thinking of getting a 6G stick if I do go get one which would be best to get a regular flash drive or a u3 flash drive ?
There should not be a difference in the sticks for ReadyBoost as far as U3 complience. - When buying for ReadyBoost there is speed differences in the USB sticks - You should research which USB sticks transfer the quickest - The slowest will not be ReadyBoost capable


PS - The greater advantage would be to increase your memory - I only suggest this if you cannot upgrade your memory
SSD drives would be the better option - Install your OS to a (32GB or larger) SSD and use another drive for storage then you wouldnt have a need in ReasdyBoost as it would probably slow your computer
 
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more memory in readyboost

I formated my 8 gb usg ntfs and readyboost alows the full 8 bg
 
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