How to View Video file from an I-PAD on My Dell Studio XPS 9100 Computer with Windows 7 Pro (SP1)


S

Sam

My daughter is sending me a video file (made from an I-PAD) thru the
Internet (using an Apple computer), . Can I run this video on my Windows 7
Prof computer, and if not, how can I convert the video file so I can run it
on my computer?? Thanks for any help, Sam
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

My daughter is sending me a video file (made from an I-PAD) thru the
Internet (using an Apple computer), . Can I run this video on my Windows 7
Prof computer, and if not, how can I convert the video file so I can run it
on my computer?? Thanks for any help, Sam
Without more information, it can be rather hard to answer.

What is the filename extension? That is the three letters after the dot,
and it gives a clue about readability.

But in general, the answer is yes, although it might be necessary to
download some free application, such as VLC, or especially, QuickTime
from the Apple site, since it's an Apple movie.
 
P

Paul

Sam said:
My daughter is sending me a video file (made from an I-PAD) thru the
Internet (using an Apple computer), . Can I run this video on my
Windows 7 Prof computer, and if not, how can I convert the video file so
I can run it on my computer?? Thanks for any help, Sam
Once the movie is detached from the email, and is available
as a separate file, you can test it with this.

http://gspot.headbands.com/v26x/GSpot270a.zip

The stub article here on GSpot, mentions a second tool you can use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSpot

"See also

MediaInfo - alternative software under active development
that can identify newer video formats
"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MediaInfo

I have not tested this, and don't know a thing about it.

http://mediainfo.sourceforge.net/en

The actual download link, disguised as usual...
Click this, and select "Save as" to save it to your download folder.
It's an executable, and you'll want your AV to scan it first, before
using it. Don't just execute it directly...

http://mediaarea.net/download/binary/mediainfo-gui/0.7.63/MediaInfo_GUI_0.7.63_Windows.exe

An AV scan got one hit. This site hosts free AV scanning capability.

https://www.virustotal.com/en/file/9caa735a680d4c7cfb77587e61be00e11a399def5b5dc2df3f629556063276a1/analysis/

And what it's telling us, is there is potentially a
"toolbar" inside the MediaInfo installer.

http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/threat/encyclopedia/entry.aspx?Name=Adware:Win32/OpenCandy

I guess I'll have to construct a virtual machine for
testing for it. Just to be safe. (Puts item on queue
for later... Takes some screwing around.)

*******

The purpose of media identification utilities, is to figure out
what "CODEC" is needed. There are two solutions to the CODEC
problem - download a CODEC pack (not recommended), or, find
a video player with a decent range of formats. Some of those,
use libavcodec for rendering, which is a way of having all
the CODECs in a private file where they can't screw up the
rest of your media operations.

For example, VLC is a movie player.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VLC_media_player

More players are listed here, such as QuickTime Basic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_player_software

Video will always be, a pain to deal with. The industry
wants it that way.

The first step, is figuring out what CODEC is needed,
and whether a popular player might support the CODEC and
format.

Paul
 
T

Tim Slattery

Gene E. Bloch said:
But in general, the answer is yes, although it might be necessary to
download some free application, such as VLC, or especially, QuickTime
from the Apple site, since it's an Apple movie.
I think VLC runs QuickTime videos, and you won't be constantly nagged
to update your Apple software.
 
P

Paul in Houston TX

Sam said:
My daughter is sending me a video file (made from an I-PAD) thru the
Internet (using an Apple computer), . Can I run this video on my
Windows 7 Prof computer, and if not, how can I convert the video file so
I can run it on my computer?? Thanks for any help, Sam
Why not try it and find out?
 
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S

Sam

Many thanks for your kind replies. The extension was .mov. This morning I
did try to open/run the the file but received the following: (Windows Media
Player cannot play the file) Have a good weekend, Sam
 
P

Paul in Houston TX

Sam said:
Many thanks for your kind replies. The extension was .mov. This
morning I did try to open/run the the file but received the following:
(Windows Media Player cannot play the file) Have a good weekend, Sam
I use VLC to view mov's.
 
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P

Paul

Sam said:
Many thanks for your kind replies. The extension was .mov. This
morning I did try to open/run the the file but received the following:
(Windows Media Player cannot play the file) Have a good weekend, Sam
I expect there are other free players that will work with .mov .

The .mov is a "container". In the same sense as I think .avi and .mkv
are containers. More than one CODEC type can be used inside.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QuickTime_File_Format

A "natural" fit for .mov, is QuickTime from Apple. Seeing as it
was their native container format for the Apple operating system.
This would be the free Apple player for your .mov file.

http://www.apple.com/quicktime/

When you install that, don't let it steal all the file associations.
Player programs, generally try to steal the file associations
from each other. For example, clicking on an .avi, you'd want
Windows Media Player to run. The only file association you might
want QuickTime to have, is .mov, so you can play those IPad movies.
I can't find a picture now of the dialog box, but you might have
an opportunity to tune that, during the QuickTime installation.
You'll want to untick most of the boxes in the file association
dialog, leaving .mov associated with QuickTime.

Other free players will do that as well (steal the file associations).
They grab all the file associations away from Windows Media Player.

When I install free players, I generally untick *all* their file
association theft tricks. And then, run the player manually.
(Start the player program up, then drag and drop a file onto the window.)
That's how I do it here. But you can do whatever you want with it.

The reason I don't want QuickTime running all the time, is it puts up
movie previews and other junk, if started on its own, and I'm not
really interested in looking at that. Operating it manually,
with no file associations, it only gets run when I really need
to see a .mov.

HTH,
Paul
 

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