Getting windows to open in full screen


R

rfdjr1

I;m new to Windows 7 but I've figured out quite a bit already in less than a
week. But one thing that perplexes me is windows opening in less than full
screen. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't I would prefer they always do
and I could downsize them if need be. Is there a way to do this on Windows 7?
Thanks.
 
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G

Grenou

I;m new to Windows 7 but I've figured out quite a bit already in less than
a
week. But one thing that perplexes me is windows opening in less than full
screen. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't I would prefer they always
do
and I could downsize them if need be. Is there a way to do this on Windows
7?
Thanks.
Windows key + Up Arrow key will make the window full screen.
I haven't heard of any method that does it automatically, so if someone
knows, please tell me the secret.
Using the keyboard shortcuts works well.
Windows Key+Left Arrow key, to dock half a screen size window to the left,
the Right Arrow key docks it to the right.

Grenou
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Windows key + Up Arrow key will make the window full screen.
I haven't heard of any method that does it automatically, so if someone
knows, please tell me the secret.
Using the keyboard shortcuts works well.
Windows Key+Left Arrow key, to dock half a screen size window to the left,
the Right Arrow key docks it to the right.

Grenou
You can change the shortcut to always open in full screen.

Right click the shortcut, choose Properties, and choose Maximized in the
Run drop-down list (it's on the shortcut tab).
 
R

rfdjr1

You can change the shortcut to always open in full screen.

Right click the shortcut, choose Properties, and choose Maximized in the
Run drop-down list (it's on the shortcut tab).
Got it. Thanks.
 
G

Grenou

Gene E. Bloch said:
You can change the shortcut to always open in full screen.

Right click the shortcut, choose Properties, and choose Maximized in the
Run drop-down list (it's on the shortcut tab).
Thank you Stumbling Bloch :)

Grenou
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, jrfjr1.

To repeat what gets posted here pretty often (and what has not changed since
about Win9x):

There are 3 versions of "full screen". They may look nearly the same to us
humans, but Windows knows the difference.

1. Maximized: This is what we often mean when we say "full screen".
It fills most of the screen, but leaves the Title Bar and Taskbar exposed.
(This is also what you get with <Win><Up>.)

2. Full Screen: This is what we get when we toggle the <F11> key - in
most places, but some apps don't respond to this. This opens the screen
even wider than Maximized, covering even the "X" in the upper right corner.
Just press <F11> again to toggle it back to the previous window size.

3. Normal window, stretched to cover most of the screen. This is what
works best in many cases. Just use your mouse (or your keyboard arrow keys)
to stretch the screen to the size you like. Windows will remember this size
UNTIL you close some other window after you close this one; Windows
remembers the LAST window closed for each app, such as an IE window.

For most apps, we can right-click on the shortcut or .exe file and click
Properties. Set the Run box to Maximized. This works for MOST apps, but
sometimes it doesn't.

Then, of course, there is also Minimized, but we seldom want an app to open
this way; it just minimizes the window to an icon on the Taskbar.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(e-mail address removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2010 (15.3.2804.0607) in Win7 Ultimate x64)

wrote in message
I;m new to Windows 7 but I've figured out quite a bit already in less than a
week. But one thing that perplexes me is windows opening in less than full
screen. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't I would prefer they always
do
and I could downsize them if need be. Is there a way to do this on Windows
7?
Thanks.
 
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