Delayed Reboot?

  • Thread starter (PeteCresswell)
  • Start date

P

(PeteCresswell)

I have a Windows 7 box acting as a server for some IP cams about 100
miles away.

Every so often, one of the cams gets goofy and has to be re-booted by
having it's power (POE) cut off and then re-applied.

Given that there are power strips (I have a couple of Bellkin's) that
will cut the power to whatever else is connected to them once the PC
that is connected on a dedicated receptacle shuts down; it seems like I
could re-boot the camera by having the POE switch on that power strip,
shutting down the PC remotely (via TeamViewer) and then having it come
back up again after maybe 10 seconds.


The Question:

Is there any way to do this under Windows 7? Seems like some PC's BIOS
allow for scheduled shutdowns/startups.... but that's not quite what I'm
looking for.

I'm looking for the ability to tell Windows 7 to shut the PC down
completely (so it does not draw any power) and then have it re-start
after a few seconds/minutes/hours....

Seems theoretically possible if a Windows 7 app could push a start time
into the BIOS and then shut down the PC.


FWIW, my fallback position will be to add a Windows Schedule item to
shut down sometime in the wee hours of the morning and set BIOS for the
PC to automatically start up sometime soon after...so a cam lockup would
have a chance of being remedied by the next day.

I do not want to get into mechanical timers mainly because the ones I've
used make a perceptible noise.... and the person who is being nice
enough to let us run that server in her home office doesn't need the
noise.

Suggestions?
 
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G

GlowingBlueMist

I have a Windows 7 box acting as a server for some IP cams about 100
miles away.

Every so often, one of the cams gets goofy and has to be re-booted by
having it's power (POE) cut off and then re-applied.

Given that there are power strips (I have a couple of Bellkin's) that
will cut the power to whatever else is connected to them once the PC
that is connected on a dedicated receptacle shuts down; it seems like I
could re-boot the camera by having the POE switch on that power strip,
shutting down the PC remotely (via TeamViewer) and then having it come
back up again after maybe 10 seconds.


The Question:

Is there any way to do this under Windows 7? Seems like some PC's BIOS
allow for scheduled shutdowns/startups.... but that's not quite what I'm
looking for.

I'm looking for the ability to tell Windows 7 to shut the PC down
completely (so it does not draw any power) and then have it re-start
after a few seconds/minutes/hours....

Seems theoretically possible if a Windows 7 app could push a start time
into the BIOS and then shut down the PC.


FWIW, my fallback position will be to add a Windows Schedule item to
shut down sometime in the wee hours of the morning and set BIOS for the
PC to automatically start up sometime soon after...so a cam lockup would
have a chance of being remedied by the next day.

I do not want to get into mechanical timers mainly because the ones I've
used make a perceptible noise.... and the person who is being nice
enough to let us run that server in her home office doesn't need the
noise.

Suggestions?
Check your BIOS again and look for something that reads like "What to do
after a power failure, remain off or power on or go back to the last
state on/off."

With that set to power on after a power failure you can then remotely
connect to the pc and use the same shutdown you would as if you were in
front of it. Then it will shut down at your command and the motherboard
will power it back on for you.
 
A

Andy Burns

GlowingBlueMist said:
Check your BIOS again and look for something that reads like "What to do
after a power failure, remain off or power on or go back to the last
state on/off."

With that set to power on after a power failure you can then remotely
connect to the pc and use the same shutdown you would as if you were in
front of it. Then it will shut down at your command and
Stay shut off.
the motherboard will power it back on for you.
No it won't because there hasn't been a power failure, so that setting
doesn't apply.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Stay shut off.


No it won't because there hasn't been a power failure, so that setting
doesn't apply.
But if there's a genuine power failure later, it will start up.

OK, I probably should have said "I agree" in a more direct manner :)
 
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B

Bob I

I have a Windows 7 box acting as a server for some IP cams about 100
miles away.

Every so often, one of the cams gets goofy and has to be re-booted by
having it's power (POE) cut off and then re-applied.

Given that there are power strips (I have a couple of Bellkin's) that
will cut the power to whatever else is connected to them once the PC
that is connected on a dedicated receptacle shuts down; it seems like I
could re-boot the camera by having the POE switch on that power strip,
shutting down the PC remotely (via TeamViewer) and then having it come
back up again after maybe 10 seconds.


The Question:

Is there any way to do this under Windows 7? Seems like some PC's BIOS
allow for scheduled shutdowns/startups.... but that's not quite what I'm
looking for.

I'm looking for the ability to tell Windows 7 to shut the PC down
completely (so it does not draw any power) and then have it re-start
after a few seconds/minutes/hours....

Seems theoretically possible if a Windows 7 app could push a start time
into the BIOS and then shut down the PC.


FWIW, my fallback position will be to add a Windows Schedule item to
shut down sometime in the wee hours of the morning and set BIOS for the
PC to automatically start up sometime soon after...so a cam lockup would
have a chance of being remedied by the next day.

I do not want to get into mechanical timers mainly because the ones I've
used make a perceptible noise.... and the person who is being nice
enough to let us run that server in her home office doesn't need the
noise.

Suggestions?
20 bucks, electronic timer, no noise.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/203638...051&N=5yc1vZc334Zb2v&R=203638976#.UWN02Fd4-Pw
 
S

Seth

(PeteCresswell) said:
I have a Windows 7 box acting as a server for some IP cams about 100
miles away.

Every so often, one of the cams gets goofy and has to be re-booted by
having it's power (POE) cut off and then re-applied.

Given that there are power strips (I have a couple of Bellkin's) that
will cut the power to whatever else is connected to them once the PC
that is connected on a dedicated receptacle shuts down; it seems like I
could re-boot the camera by having the POE switch on that power strip,
shutting down the PC remotely (via TeamViewer) and then having it come
back up again after maybe 10 seconds.


The Question:

Is there any way to do this under Windows 7? Seems like some PC's BIOS
allow for scheduled shutdowns/startups.... but that's not quite what I'm
looking for.

I'm looking for the ability to tell Windows 7 to shut the PC down
completely (so it does not draw any power) and then have it re-start
after a few seconds/minutes/hours....

Seems theoretically possible if a Windows 7 app could push a start time
into the BIOS and then shut down the PC.


FWIW, my fallback position will be to add a Windows Schedule item to
shut down sometime in the wee hours of the morning and set BIOS for the
PC to automatically start up sometime soon after...so a cam lockup would
have a chance of being remedied by the next day.

I do not want to get into mechanical timers mainly because the ones I've
used make a perceptible noise.... and the person who is being nice
enough to let us run that server in her home office doesn't need the
noise.
Not quite the same direction of where you were going with your questions
above but will do what is needed and works well. I use these for a number
of PCs at my office along with an IP-KVM so I can work remotely, even when I
have to rebuild a test PC. You won't need the KVM for your application
though.

http://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CSW8RU-CyberSwitch-Management-Warranty/dp/B000E99VR0

8 port power strip with a web interface to flip power on\off per outlet.
 
G

GlowingBlueMist

But if there's a genuine power failure later, it will start up.

OK, I probably should have said "I agree" in a more direct manner :)
Right you both were, my bad.
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

Right you both were, my bad.
Not so bad, just a slip.

Nice thing about the newsgroups is that those things get corrected
quickly enough.

Maybe a not so nice thing is that true statements can also get corrected
:)
 

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