Copying email address list from WinXP to W7


M

Maurice Batey

Have been asked to help a neighbour migrate from WinXP (on a desktop
PC) to Windows 7 (on laptop).

She has been using Outlook Express for email, and does not want to lose
her email address list.

I am assuming installing Windows LiveMail on W7 would be the best fit
for an O.Express user, and wonder if anyone here could throw some light
on importing the WinXP OE email address list into WindowsLive on W7.

Would e.g. the File Transer Wizard take care of that?

Anyone here know where WinXP and W7 WindowsLive keep the email address
list, please?
 
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B

Bruce Hagen

Maurice Batey said:
Have been asked to help a neighbour migrate from WinXP (on a desktop
PC) to Windows 7 (on laptop).

She has been using Outlook Express for email, and does not want to lose
her email address list.

I am assuming installing Windows LiveMail on W7 would be the best fit
for an O.Express user, and wonder if anyone here could throw some light
on importing the WinXP OE email address list into WindowsLive on W7.

Would e.g. the File Transer Wizard take care of that?

Anyone here know where WinXP and W7 WindowsLive keep the email address
list, please?


This covers everything to go from OE to WLMail 2009. It is the same for
WLMail 2011, but navigating may be slightly different with the ribbon
toolbar design.

Transferring data from Outlook Express to Windows Live Mail:

For Messages:

Copy the *ENTIRE* OE message store folder to a flash drive. (Folders.dbx
must be included). Place this on the Desktop or other location on the
machine using WLMail. Open WLMail and: File | Import | Messages |
Microsoft Outlook Express 6 and point to where you saved it.

OE Message Store Location:

In OE: Tools | Options | Maintenance | Store Folder will reveal the
location of your Outlook Express files. Write the location down and
navigate to it in Windows Explorer or, copy and paste it into Start | Run.

In WinXP, Win2K & Win2K3, the OE user files (DBX and WAB) are by default
marked as hidden. To view these files in Windows Explorer, you must enable
Show Hidden Files and Folders under Start | Control Panel | Folder Options
Icon | View, or in Windows Explorer | Tools | Folder Options | View.

For Addresses:

Open the Address Book in OE and File | Export | Address Book (wab) and
save it to the Desktop. Copy to a flash drive. Place this on the Desktop
or other location on the machine using WLMail.

Open the Contacts list in WLMail, (Go | Contacts on the Menu Bar), and
File | Import | Windows Address Book (wab) and point to where you saved
it.

Note: If you use a CD or DVD instead of a flash drive, after placing on
the new machine you must remove the Read Only attribute in Properties
before you import.

For Account Settings:

In OE: Tools | Accounts, select the account and export it to the Desktop.
This will be a .iaf file. Copy it to the new machine's Desktop and in
WLMail: Tools | Accounts and import the settings from the location you
saved them.
 
J

James Silverton

Have been asked to help a neighbour migrate from WinXP (on a desktop
PC) to Windows 7 (on laptop).

She has been using Outlook Express for email, and does not want to lose
her email address list.

I am assuming installing Windows LiveMail on W7 would be the best fit
for an O.Express user, and wonder if anyone here could throw some light
on importing the WinXP OE email address list into WindowsLive on W7.

Would e.g. the File Transer Wizard take care of that?

Anyone here know where WinXP and W7 WindowsLive keep the email address
list, please?
I have somehow managed to delete Bruce's very helpful reply. I am still
very much a newbie with Mozilla Thunderbird. However, I had printed it,
thank heavens.

I am faced with the same problem myself and I really appreciate Bruce's
reply to the OP. Is it too dumb to ask Bruce a similar question about
macro files for MS Word? I did not even realize that to use macros I
have to become a "Developer"!

I know that I should have replied to *your* original post, Bruce.

TIA,
 
B

Bruce Hagen

James Silverton said:
I have somehow managed to delete Bruce's very helpful reply. I am still
very much a newbie with Mozilla Thunderbird. However, I had printed it,
thank heavens.

I am faced with the same problem myself and I really appreciate Bruce's
reply to the OP. Is it too dumb to ask Bruce a similar question about
macro files for MS Word? I did not even realize that to use macros I
have to become a "Developer"!

I know that I should have replied to *your* original post, Bruce.

TIA,

I have never used MS Word. I use Corel WordPerfect. I also have never
created macros, but I have not heard of needing to be a developer.

Microsoft Office Word Forum
http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/category/officeword
 
J

James Silverton

I have never used MS Word. I use Corel WordPerfect. I also have never
created macros, but I have not heard of needing to be a developer.

Microsoft Office Word Forum
http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/category/officeword
The "become a Developer" was intended to be jocular. It appears that all
tabs in the control bars are not the default and it is necessary to
display the "Developer" tab to get the macro commands. Unfortunately, I
have a small set of macros that I find very useful, including one that
copies changes made in one panel of a table to 9 others in a 2x5 table
in order to make business cards. I could type in the VBA code for the
macros but I am a lousy typist.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I have somehow managed to delete Bruce's very helpful reply. I am still
very much a newbie with Mozilla Thunderbird. However, I had printed it,
thank heavens.

I am faced with the same problem myself and I really appreciate Bruce's
reply to the OP. Is it too dumb to ask Bruce a similar question about
macro files for MS Word? I did not even realize that to use macros I
have to become a "Developer"!

I know that I should have replied to *your* original post, Bruce.

TIA,
At the very least youm can go to hte macros in your cdurrent verson of
Word and print them out or save them as files.

In Word 2003, this works:
Open a file with a macro you want to save.
Go to Tools - Macro - Macros, Edit a macro, and in the Edit window, and
choose File - Export. Ave them in a folder of your choice with a name of
your choice. You get a text file with extension .bas.

Actually, you can go to Tools - Macro - Visual Basic Editor. In the left
pane you can navigate sort of Explorer-like (but the pane is a pain to
navigate!) and expose some macros in the same window as above.

Some macros aren't editable, so I guess they're system macros.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

At the very least youm can go to hte macros in your cdurrent verson of
Word and print them out or save them as files.
"At the very least you can go to the macros in your current version of
Word and print them out or save them as files."

My news reader automatically marks misspelled words, so I have no excuse
for the above :)
 
K

Ken Blake

"At the very least you can go to the macros in your current version of
Word and print them out or save them as files."

My news reader automatically marks misspelled words, so I have no excuse
for the above :)

If you are interested, let me recommend a free program I use:
autohotkey. Like you, I am very likely to type "hte" instead of "the,"
but I have autohotkey set to automatically change "hte" to "the."

And that's true, not just in my newsreader, but anywhere I type.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

If you are interested, let me recommend a free program I use:
autohotkey. Like you, I am very likely to type "hte" instead of "the,"
but I have autohotkey set to automatically change "hte" to "the."

And that's true, not just in my newsreader, but anywhere I type.
You have no idea how bad a typist I am! I'd never be able to add all the
bad words (some of them four-letter words) to the list :)

I turned off the corresponding service on my phone - it drove me crazy.
But then, it wasn't automatic - it kept presenting several options and
interfering with my typing. Part of that was a bit of PEBCAK (actually
PEBFAP - "problem exists between finger and phone" - or PEBBAP - "brain"
instead of "finger").
 
C

choro

If you are interested, let me recommend a free program I use:
autohotkey. Like you, I am very likely to type "hte" instead of "the,"
but I have autohotkey set to automatically change "hte" to "the."

And that's true, not just in my newsreader, but anywhere I type.

I would have thought it would have been simpler to learn to key in "the"!
 
T

Tester

choro said:
I would have thought it would have been simpler to learn to key in "the"!
No if English is not your first language. Chinese have serious problems
getting grasp of this.
 
K

Ken Blake

I would have thought it would have been simpler to learn to key in "the"!

*Learning* to do it is easy. The. The. The.

But getting my fingers to do it reliably is hard for me. I'm a
two-finger typist, but a pretty fast one, and I miss lots of typos.
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

*Learning* to do it is easy. The. The. The.

But getting my fingers to do it reliably is hard for me. I'm a
two-finger typist, but a pretty fast one, and I miss lots of typos.
I'm a twelve-finger (I think that's the number) typist, but the real
problem is that the signals get out of sync, so the letter from the left
hand often gets ahead of the letter from the right hand or vice versa.
Thus "teh", "adn", and so on. Although some of my typing looks like I
dropped a random bunch of marbles onto the keyboard.

An oddity: my spell checker always underlines "teh", but I've never
managed to get it to notice "adn". I finally stopped trying.
 
B

Bob Henson

I'm a twelve-finger (I think that's the number) typist, but the real
problem is that the signals get out of sync, so the letter from the left
hand often gets ahead of the letter from the right hand or vice versa.
Thus "teh", "adn", and so on. Although some of my typing looks like I
dropped a random bunch of marbles onto the keyboard.

An oddity: my spell checker always underlines "teh", but I've never
managed to get it to notice "adn". I finally stopped trying.
Assuming there's not a silly mistake in Dialog's main spell checker, the
probability is that you have added "adn" to your personal dictionary by
mistake, so the answer is to remove it and then the speil chucker will
underline it. In Dialog it's well hidden, so in the unlikely event you
can't find it, you need to open the composition window, then it's - Spell
check > Settings > Dictionaries button > select you personal one > Edit and
then remove the offending word.

On the same topic, have you seen/used AutoHotKey? Its a remarkable free
program that lets you configure nearly anything in Windows. Amongst it's
many talents is the ability to autocorrect text as you type (like Word).
You have to add the text first, of course, but for any words that you
habitually type incorrectly (becuase instead of because is a favourite of
mine) it's a boon.
 
C

choro

*Learning* to do it is easy. The. The. The.

But getting my fingers to do it reliably is hard for me. I'm a
two-finger typist, but a pretty fast one, and I miss lots of typos.
Why don't you learn to touch-type and use all your fingers and leave the
two fingers to use in bed! But two fingers of the same hand, mind you!

But honestly I just cannot understand why people do not just practise
touch-typing for a couple or three months and rake in the benefits for a
whole lifetime. Achieving 30 wpm doesn't take long and is quite fast
enough for most people. Higher speeds follow naturally as one uses the
keyboard more and more.
 
K

Ken Blake

I'm a twelve-finger (I think that's the number) typist, but the real
problem is that the signals get out of sync, so the letter from the left
hand often gets ahead of the letter from the right hand or vice versa.
Thus "teh", "adn", and so on. Although some of my typing looks like I
dropped a random bunch of marbles onto the keyboard.


Same with me.


An oddity: my spell checker always underlines "teh", but I've never
managed to get it to notice "adn". I finally stopped trying.

I'll try recommending autohotkey once more. You're likely to find it
very helpful, both for correcting typos and for typing standard text
with just a few letters. For example, I have it set so that if I type
"pdy" I get "Ouch! Please don't yell at us. We can hear you if you
type normally, in mixed case."
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Assuming there's not a silly mistake in Dialog's main spell checker, the
probability is that you have added "adn" to your personal dictionary by
mistake, so the answer is to remove it and then the speil chucker will
underline it. In Dialog it's well hidden, so in the unlikely event you
can't find it, you need to open the composition window, then it's - Spell
check > Settings > Dictionaries button > select you personal one > Edit and
then remove the offending word.

On the same topic, have you seen/used AutoHotKey? Its a remarkable free
program that lets you configure nearly anything in Windows. Amongst it's
many talents is the ability to autocorrect text as you type (like Word).
You have to add the text first, of course, but for any words that you
habitually type incorrectly (becuase instead of because is a favourite of
mine) it's a boon.
When I said that I tried to get it to notice "adn", I meant that I
looked into the spell checker's settings and files.

In another post recently (I forget where), I mentioned my (probably
idiosyncratic) reaction to automatic correction. It drives me nuts, so I
turn it off wherever it occurs by default (MS Word, cell-phone, ...).

I found the post. It's in this thread.
Message-ID: <1df7aarzirof7$.hbk7u4oxspd8$.dlg@40tude.net>
 
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K

Ken Blake

Why don't you learn to touch-type and use all your fingers and leave the
two fingers to use in bed! But two fingers of the same hand, mind you!

But honestly I just cannot understand why people do not just practise
touch-typing for a couple or three months and rake in the benefits for a
whole lifetime. Achieving 30 wpm doesn't take long and is quite fast
enough for most people. Higher speeds follow naturally as one uses the
keyboard more and more.

I'm 73 years old, and went to high school back in the days when all
girls learned to touch type and all boys didn't.

I'm around 30 wpm even using just a few fingers (actually more like
five than two). Some 25 years or so ago, I started practicing touch
typing for a while. But I gave it up, for several reasons:

1. I'm pretty fast without it, and I really didn't expect it to add a
lot to my speed.

2. Practicing was a pain in the a** and I didn't enjoy it at all.

3. Practicing was taking a lot of time, and I didn't want to waste the
time doing it. I'd a lot rather use the time to practice my guitar and
banjo playing than practice my typing.

4. The real benefit of touch typing is for the professional typist who
needs to copy what her boss has written and type it (looking at the
handwritten text, not the keyboard). For me, my own boss, and having
nothing to copy, looking at the keyboard is not a problem.

I know the keyboard very well, and it doesn't take me any time to find
the keys I want. The only real difference between me and the average
professional typist is that I have to look at the keyboard and she
doesn't. I didn't want to waste my time to learn a skill (typing
without looking at the keyboard) that I didn't need.
 

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