Can I do an upgrade with using the full Windows 7 Ultimate retail package?

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Mark F, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Mark F

    Mark F Guest

    My system is currently running:
    Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit

    I'd like to move to Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit.

    I'd also like to be able to install Windows 7 Ultimate
    from scratch at an unknown time in the future.

    I don't have the OEM (Dell) version of Windows XP (32-bit) that was
    originally, but I do have the media and keys from the
    Vista Upgrade media that was used to upgrade from Windows XP to
    Vista Ultimate 64-bit.

    Can I do the upgrade with a full Windows 7 Ultimate package?

    This is what I want to use:
    GLC-00182 Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (32- or 64-bit)

    This is what would normally be used for the upgrade:
    GLC-00184 Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (32- or 64-bit)
    (Upgrade from XP or Vista),
    but Microsoft has assured me that I won't be able to
    do the installation to a new disk more than 5 years from
    now because the OEM key, etc., from the original Windows XP
    will not be supported.

    I have to do an Upgrade, not an install from scratch at
    this time. I don't feel like buying a GLC-00182 that
    won't be able to "activate", or whatever now, and won't
    be able to "activate" in the future when I might need to
    use it.

    (I can spend the US$100 extra for the full version with no
    problem, but I don't feel like paying US$280 extra for
    a full version that I won't be able to use on off
    chance that I need to use.)
     
    Mark F, Aug 4, 2011
    #1
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  2. Mark F

    G. Morgan Guest

    Upgrading a system to Windows 7 is problematic and is not recommended.
    It's much better to do a from-scratch "new" installation.

    It will let you install w/o a product key for 30 days. You can
    dual-boot in that time and transfer your settings and programs while
    you're digging up the $$ for a legit key.
     
    G. Morgan, Aug 4, 2011
    #2
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  3. Mark F

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Mark.

    The "full retail" and the "upgrade" packages for Win7 Ultimate are identical
    EXCEPT that the upgrade disk will look for an already-installed version of
    Windows. Once over that hurdle, you can do either a new or an upgrade
    installation with either product disk.

    As I'm sure you know, you cannot install 64-bit while running a 32-bit
    Windows - and vice versa. Hardware differences require that you BOOT from
    64-bit media to install Win x64. You can boot into Win x64 or Vista x64 or
    Win7 x64, then insert the Win7 x64 DVD and run its Setup.exe. Or you can
    boot from the Win7 x64 DVD and let Setup.exe run automatically. Either way,
    you will be booted into the 64-bit environment.

    But I'm glossing over the OEM aspect because I've never had a computer with
    Windows pre-installed. I've upgraded only a few times; I usually prefer to
    do a clean install,

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-2010)
    Windows Live Mail 2011 (Build 15.4.3538.0513) in Win7 Ultimate x64 SP1


    "Mark F" wrote in message

    My system is currently running:
    Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit

    I'd like to move to Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit.

    I'd also like to be able to install Windows 7 Ultimate
    from scratch at an unknown time in the future.

    I don't have the OEM (Dell) version of Windows XP (32-bit) that was
    originally, but I do have the media and keys from the
    Vista Upgrade media that was used to upgrade from Windows XP to
    Vista Ultimate 64-bit.

    Can I do the upgrade with a full Windows 7 Ultimate package?

    This is what I want to use:
    GLC-00182 Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (32- or 64-bit)

    This is what would normally be used for the upgrade:
    GLC-00184 Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (32- or 64-bit)
    (Upgrade from XP or Vista),
    but Microsoft has assured me that I won't be able to
    do the installation to a new disk more than 5 years from
    now because the OEM key, etc., from the original Windows XP
    will not be supported.

    I have to do an Upgrade, not an install from scratch at
    this time. I don't feel like buying a GLC-00182 that
    won't be able to "activate", or whatever now, and won't
    be able to "activate" in the future when I might need to
    use it.

    (I can spend the US$100 extra for the full version with no
    problem, but I don't feel like paying US$280 extra for
    a full version that I won't be able to use on off
    chance that I need to use.)
     
    R. C. White, Aug 4, 2011
    #3
  4. Mark F

    SC Tom Guest

    Not necessarily true. I've done a number of upgrades, and have had no
    problems accomplishing it, nor with the finished product.
     
    SC Tom, Aug 5, 2011
    #4
  5. Mark F

    G. Morgan Guest

    YMMV, but best practice dictates a clean installation.
     
    G. Morgan, Aug 5, 2011
    #5
  6. Mark F

    Bob I Guest

    NOT, upgrading was only problematic going from a "DOS based Windows" to
    a "NT based Windows". And of course you can't do a direct upgrade from
    before Vista to Windows 7.
     
    Bob I, Aug 5, 2011
    #6
  7. Same here (but only two upgrades).

    A bit of work, but not hard and no oddities.
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Aug 5, 2011
    #7
  8. Mark F

    G. Morgan Guest

    Upgrading from XP to 7 is a nightmare. Not only does it take forever,
    but you're left with a bloated and outdated/error filled registry.

    It is so much easier and safer just to repartition ahead of time (I like
    http://www.extend-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html ).


    Windows 7 setup will setup dual-boot by itself, then use EasyBCD to
    tweak.

    From there, grab your licence keys and re-install programs. All your
    documents/installers should be on a separate partition/disk anyway. And
    using the "Windows Easy Transfer", you won't have to re-do your
    customized settings.
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/windows-easy-transfer

    Nice and clean.. :)
     
    G. Morgan, Aug 5, 2011
    #8
  9. Indeed, it does. So, no more of a "nightmare" than a from-scratch
    install of Windows 7 since, really, that's what it is.
     
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Aug 5, 2011
    #9
  10. Mark F

    Ken Blake Guest



    That's correct. An upgrade from XP to Windows 7 is not possible.
     
    Ken Blake, Aug 5, 2011
    #10
  11. Mark F

    Ken Blake Guest


    Although many people will tell you that formatting and installing
    cleanly is the best way to go, I disagree. Unlike with previous
    versions of Windows, when doing an upgrade was often a mistake, an
    upgrade to Windows XP or later replaces almost everything, and usually
    works very well. The only real exception is when you are having
    problems; in that situation, an upgrade often worsens problems, rather
    than solving them.

    My recommendation is to at least try the upgrade, since it's much
    easier than a clean installation. You can always change your mind and
    reinstall cleanly if problems develop.

    However, don't assume that doing an upgrade relieves you of the need
    to backup your data, etc. before beginning. Before starting to
    upgrade, it's always prudent to recognize that things like a sudden
    power loss can occur in the middle of it and cause the loss of
    everything. For that reason you should make sure you have backups and
    anything else you need to reinstall if the worst happens.

    Let me add that I've even upgraded from XP to Windows 7. Yes, I know
    that's not possible, but I did it on my netbook in two steps--first XP
    to Vista, then Vista to Windows 7. I don't normally recommend it,
    since it doubles the risk of problems, but I gave it a try, being
    fully prepared to do it over cleanly if problems developed. I've been
    running the result successfully for many months now, with no problems
    at all.
     
    Ken Blake, Aug 5, 2011
    #11
  12. Mark F

    Bob I Guest

    Not really sure what Morgan is blathering on about, it's plain he didn't
    read/comprehend what I wrote.
     
    Bob I, Aug 5, 2011
    #12
  13. Mark F

    SC Tom Guest

    *** Reply inline

    *** Anyone who does an upgrade from OS1 to OS2 while having problems with
    OS1 is either a masochist or just likes trying to solve nearly unsolvable
    problems :)
     
    SC Tom, Aug 5, 2011
    #13
  14. Aren't those two choices synonyms? :)
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Aug 5, 2011
    #14
  15. Mark F

    SC Tom Guest

    I guess they (loosely) could be, but not necessarily. A masochist isn't
    always a problem solver, but a problem solver could be a masochist (ask
    anyone in IT LOL).
     
    SC Tom, Aug 6, 2011
    #15
  16. You have a point. A masochist might be a problem creator :)

    Or at least a seeker...

    In support of your theory: my last job before retiring was customer
    support - solving software problems in large and complicated machines
    used in wafer processing. It did seem to qualify as masochism as much as
    IT does.
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Aug 6, 2011
    #16
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