American English and British English


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I always love to compare these 2 languages.
Color- colour
Favorite- favourite
Theater- theatre
That's only a few. Please feel free to add more in this thread.
It's fascinating how 2 regions using the same language can use different words and spellings.
 
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Veedaz

~
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English - American English

kerb - curb
flavour - flavor
humour - humor
tyre - tire
neighbour - neighbor
judgement - judgment
analyse - analyze
catalogue - catalog
licence - license
customise - customize
 
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I know the Americans can't help it but the way they pronounce it is a bit odd too. And probably likewise for us.. for example...

Route

cant think of others, but when i do i will let u know? And to let you know, we dont all speak posh, and drink tea and eat scones for lunch.
 
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Well this thread is a big reality check for me...
 

davehc

Microsoft MVP
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I,ll post whilst munching a burger and drinking coffee. (I'm English.)

I am retired, but during the whole of my working life, I worked for a company who contracted to foreign governments. This involved two or three year stay, normally, in different countries.
As we all know, English comes in many varieties. <<the interesting thing, I found, was that English, (from England- that is not intended to be rude) was the easiest to understand, however remote from the original was the pronunciation. Oddly, I now, because of family circumstances, now live in Denmark. Danish is not exactly a worldwide language, as you would understand. It is, however, a very precise and old language. Of all the countries I have visited, I find it very difficult to make myself understood, if I stray even a little from the original.
Anyway, I think I am off thread. Like the OP, I also notice the difference in the two languages. But I do believe that, whilst very American expressions are creeping in to UK English - and all pop singers seem to think it is a requirement to sing with an American accent, at the same time, American is evolving.
My main contact with the American language is through TV. Probably a poor source. But I have noticed that invariably, for example, the flat "a" as in BAT has become "e" as in BET.
 
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draceena

That Crazy Amazon Chick!
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I find that many residents of the US tend to "drawl"...as in draw-out the sound of a word that makes it hard to understand what the speaker is saying, making such words like heart sound like haaat. But then some other words like popular get shortened to pop-lur.

But I agree with davehc, it seems no matter how "bad" english is spoken it is possible to eventually understand the speaker, where other languages are ver exacting and just the smallest mis-pronouncation can mean a different word.
 
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As a native US English speaker, believe me when I say that anyone who makes "heart" sound anything like "hat" is silly to us as well. Ditto for anyone who makes "bat" sound like bet, but I have not noticed that on TV, and I specifically went looking for it on several dozen TV shows.
 

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