Windows 7 64 bit driver for Epson Stylus Photo

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EPSON STYLUS 1270 PRINTER WORKING IN WINDOWS 8.1 should work in earlier versions of windows.

Wonderful News. I dragged out this amazing printer after despairing that I wouldn't be able to use it anymore due to the newer operating systems. As a last ditch attempt I plugged it in and entirely on its own it began downloading the most relevant driver for itself. I couldn't believe my eyes. No outdated software disks necessary. I had spent days reading other people's despair at not being able to get this old trooper running. I tried downloading the archaic software on the Epson site but that just got rejected by the OS of which I am using 8.1. To have it relegated in the basement when it was made to go on and on is just so wrong. I did download the EasyPrint module that is listed with the 1280 model of this series, as it's compatible with a few Epson models. I don't think this made any real difference. Just plug the printer into your computer's usb drive and wait. I was connected to the internet whilst it was connected, but again, not entirely sure that this was relevant or not - perhaps it may be. I am just so thrilled that this computer can again serve me with the newer operating systems. It's done so since Windows ME . That's embarrassing to say but it's true. - never failed me. It weighs a tone and is mega heavy. It makes a loud screechy sound as it prints May I say it's music to my ears to hear that sound again. The software it will download is called Epson Stylus Photo 1270 ESC/P 2. I do hope other users get this baby going, He is superb and shouldn't have his life determined by an OS when there is nothing wrong with him. I am also using a 64 Bit version of the OS
 
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The original post was 4 1/2 years ago and time has a way of "solving" some of these problems for us. I also had the original Epson Stylus Photo and loved it and similarly had a lifetime ink supply. Those cartridges could be refilled almost forever and I'm still trying to get multi-colored inks off my hands to prove it. Just wish I had known about this forum back when I was trying to keep the thing running when new fangled Win XP came out. You get subtle hints that it might be time to move on when they stop putting parallel ports on computers and stop using floppy disks so you can't load the drivers. And when you overcome those issues, you find that your favorite software, which you bought the printer to use with, won't run under any recent version of Windows. Kudos to those who stuck with it and kept those great old work horses running despite all odds. If you are one of those dedicated few, print as much as possible on the old printer. Even if it was designed as a photo printer (which in those days, meant photo only), it's important to keep ink moving through the nozzles by printing something, especially if you are using up an ancient ink supply (it may last a century once you get it on paper, well a few years if it's the original ink, but it has a shelf life while it is still liquid). Use it as a general purpose printer to keep the nozzles from clogging up and to use up your ink supply before the mechanical parts die of old age.
 
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The original post was 4 1/2 years ago and time has a way of "solving" some of these problems for us. I also had the original Epson Stylus Photo and loved it and similarly had a lifetime ink supply. Those cartridges could be refilled almost forever and I'm still trying to get multi-colored inks off my hands to prove it. Just wish I had known about this forum back when I was trying to keep the thing running when new fangled Win XP came out. You get subtle hints that it might be time to move on when they stop putting parallel ports on computers and stop using floppy disks so you can't load the drivers. And when you overcome those issues, you find that your favorite software, which you bought the printer to use with, won't run under any recent version of Windows. Kudos to those who stuck with it and kept those great old work horses running despite all odds. If you are one of those dedicated few, print as much as possible on the old printer. Even if it was designed as a photo printer (which in those days, meant photo only), it's important to keep ink moving through the nozzles by printing something, especially if you are using up an ancient ink supply (it may last a century once you get it on paper, well a few years if it's the original ink, but it has a shelf life while it is still liquid). Use it as a general purpose printer to keep the nozzles from clogging up and to use up your ink supply before the mechanical parts die of old age.
Thank you Fixer for your response. I had no intention of getting rid of Epson stylus photo 1270. if it had to occupy a space in the basement - so be it. I guess I could have set up a Vista OS as a virtual pc on a partitioned part of the drive, as I know some users of this printer and similar have done so. If you have a computer that still has an older OS that you know it used to work on you can always transfer your files to a usb drive and print from there. There are ways no matter how fiddly and time-consuming. I do have a newer printer with an added scanner (which was the only reason I purchased it) but it can't compare to the quality of print that the 1270 provides. Its cartridges are also somewhat expensive (not a great deal) and I just don't enjoy using the newer one - much too inferior. I use the 1270 for all printing needs, photo and print. It is never neglected. I didn't realize it didn't work on a newer version of XP. I never used XP. I always had Vista and it worked great with that - no hassles in setting it up on that. I know a lot of folk bagged Vista but I loved it. Served all my requirements. Long live the 1270!
 
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I bought my Epson Stylus Photo I believe when Windows 3.1 was the latest and greatest and kept it working on an old XP machine that I kept around just so I could use the printer and some old software that wouldn't run on anything else. I finally gave up the fight when it was time to replace XP because it stopped being supported. In the meantime, photo quality printers and all-in-ones could be had at falling prices, recently as low as $100. I went through five of those (HP and Canon), that each died within a few years and used ink that has become increasingly hard to replace with generic. The early consumer printers were designed to be the best printers that could be produced at a consumer price. At some point, the manufacturers figured out that the printers are disposable mechanisms for selling proprietary ink.
 
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