Is there eyeglass substitutes for Windows7?


P

Peter Jason

I wear glasses.

I'd rather not do so when using the computer, so I ask: has anyone
designed software to adjust the optical characteristics of the screen,
via software, to make the wearing of glasses unnecessary?

This would be a great boon for those always in front of a screen.
There would be two fields for a mag & astimatism adjustment.

Peter
 
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S

SC Tom

Peter Jason said:
I wear glasses.

I'd rather not do so when using the computer, so I ask: has anyone
designed software to adjust the optical characteristics of the screen,
via software, to make the wearing of glasses unnecessary?

This would be a great boon for those always in front of a screen.
There would be two fields for a mag & astimatism adjustment.

Peter
As one who can relate, I'd love to see prescription windshields, too :)

I don't think it could be done with software, aside from the fact you'd have to be almost exactly the same distance from
the screen and at the same angle. IOW, your eyes would have to be a constant 30" (+/- an inch or two, depending on your
prescription) and almost dead nut center. Then the screen would have to be curved so that the top, bottom, and side
edges were the same distance as the center from your eyes.

Nice idea, but I don't see it being economically feasible for anyone to be working on it. But, if you'd care to invest.
.. . ;-)
 
E

Evan Platt

P

Peter Jason

As one who can relate, I'd love to see prescription windshields, too :)

I don't think it could be done with software, aside from the fact you'd have to be almost exactly the same distance from
the screen and at the same angle. IOW, your eyes would have to be a constant 30" (+/- an inch or two, depending on your
prescription) and almost dead nut center. Then the screen would have to be curved so that the top, bottom, and side
edges were the same distance as the center from your eyes.

Nice idea, but I don't see it being economically feasible for anyone to be working on it. But, if you'd care to invest.
. . ;-)
Thanks, I remember the story about the vilely rich Las Vegasian who
did just this to his windshield. I need TV glasses, computer glasses,
driving glasses; & bifocals the rest of the time! Ah well!
 
J

John Williamson

Peter said:
Thanks, I remember the story about the vilely rich Las Vegasian who
did just this to his windshield. I need TV glasses, computer glasses,
driving glasses; & bifocals the rest of the time! Ah well!
One way might be to put two thin layers of plastic in front of the
screen, seperated by a fluid which could be pumped in and out. It's a
method already used as a way to make very cheap glasses in Africa. The
plastic sheets may need to have fresnel lenses moulded into them to make
the whole assembly a sort of zoom lens.

Then automate the pump to adjust for different users as they log on?
 
G

Gordon

I need TV glasses, computer glasses,
driving glasses;& bifocals the rest of the time! Ah well!
Have you tried Varifocals instead of Bifocals? You should find that one
pair will do all those.....
 
T

Ted

Peter Jason said:
I wear glasses.

I'd rather not do so when using the computer, so I ask: has anyone
designed software to adjust the optical characteristics of the screen,
via software, to make the wearing of glasses unnecessary?

This would be a great boon for those always in front of a screen.
There would be two fields for a mag & astimatism adjustment.

Peter
I used to use a pair of reading glasses from the Dollar Store for the
computer. Now I have trifocals and they work fine.
Ted
 
B

Bob Henson

Have you tried Varifocals instead of Bifocals? You should find that one
pair will do all those.....
The compromise required to do that has some snags. My varifocals are
well made and quite expensive, but whilst they work fine at distance and
close up, the field of view at computer screen distance is to small to
be practical - certainly on today's wide screens. I use them very
happily for all purposes except computer use - where I have a second
pair of what are called "interview" lenses. These are another varifocal
but with a range only from close to medium distance - the focus and the
field of view is fine for everything from reading small print to about
six feet away.

--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK


I went for a medical and asked the doctor, "How do I stand?" He said,
"That's what puzzles me too!"
 
G

Gordon

The compromise required to do that has some snags. My varifocals are
well made and quite expensive, but whilst they work fine at distance and
close up, the field of view at computer screen distance is to small to
be practical - certainly on today's wide screens. I use them very
happily for all purposes except computer use - where I have a second
pair of what are called "interview" lenses. These are another varifocal
but with a range only from close to medium distance - the focus and the
field of view is fine for everything from reading small print to about
six feet away.
My optician actually tested both reading and computer monitor distances
with mine and they're fine, even on a wide-screen laptop....
 
B

Bob Henson

My optician actually tested both reading and computer monitor distances
with mine and they're fine, even on a wide-screen laptop....
Hmm, maybe my corrections are outside the range that it works well - or
I need a new optician.


--
Bob
Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK


Middle names are so you know when you're in trouble!
 
S

Shoe

Hmm, maybe my corrections are outside the range that it works well - or
I need a new optician.
I find that my variable lenses are very poor for working on the
computer. Reading glasses from Costco (about $20 for 4 pairs) are much
better, so I keep a pair by the computer and wear them. Actually, I
find the reading glasses preferable for reading also and keep a pair
at various places in the house, so only wear the prescription glasses
when going out of the house. I recently had cataract surgery and no
longer need glasses for distance, only for reading.
 
S

SC Tom

Bob Henson said:
Hmm, maybe my corrections are outside the range that it works well - or
I need a new optician.
I have two sets of variable lens glasses- one for everyday use, and one for sports (both playing and viewing). The
everyday ones (33mm high) work well with everything from reading to driving, and are ok for computer work at my desktop.
For a laptop on my lap, they work great since that falls into that "just about reading" range.
The other pair (39mm high) I use for playing tennis and for watching live sports- the lenses are a little larger than my
others, so the field of adjustment is wider than my others. They work ok for computer work, but the field is wide enough
that I find myself tilting my head back more to adjust the range. <sigh> Just can't seem to win for loosing on that
deal.

When I was working, I had a pair of computer glasses like yours, 6 feet or so down to real close. Unfortunately, as the
company got smaller, my job field got larger, so along with my IS/IT duties, I also had to drive a forklift daily. I
could drive a car and the forklift well enough with my computer glasses, but taking pallets off a 25 feet high rack was
a little unnerving :-( I ended up switching glasses so often during the day that I got used to wearing my everyday ones
all the time. I have some nice frames in the drawer for future use, if I need them :)
 
R

Ray

I wear glasses.

I'd rather not do so when using the computer, so I ask: has anyone
designed software to adjust the optical characteristics of the screen,
via software, to make the wearing of glasses unnecessary?

This would be a great boon for those always in front of a screen.
There would be two fields for a mag & astimatism adjustment.

Peter
Software would not work. There is a simple solution. Have
appropriate lenses implanted in your eye balls. I had it done. I am
71 and rarely have to wear eye glasses any more. It is called
cataract surgery.

Ray
 
S

Satanic Mechanic ©

Software would not work. There is a simple solution. Have
appropriate lenses implanted in your eye balls. I had it done. I am
71 and rarely have to wear eye glasses any more. It is called
cataract surgery.

Ray
i have a better idea. dont turn your computer on again and the
problem will be aleviated. what a stoooopid question to even ask.
even stooopider, the people who responded with answers
 
P

Peter Jason

Have you tried Varifocals instead of Bifocals? You should find that one
pair will do all those.....
I have a quality pair of varifocals bifocals for normal use, but for
driving long distances I use distance glasses with John Lennon frames
from here:
https://www.zennioptical.com/
The large round frames allow maximum eye coverage and manual rotation
of the lenses for fine tuning of astigmatism (if necessary). These
are very cheap and therefore useful for backups. I have a pair for
TV, for bedtime reading, driving, computer etc.
 
P

Peter Jason

i have a better idea. dont turn your computer on again and the
problem will be aleviated. what a stoooopid question to even ask.
even stooopider, the people who responded with answers
Your spell checker ain't makin' it!
 
P

Peter Jason

I used to use a pair of reading glasses from the Dollar Store for the
computer. Now I have trifocals and they work fine.
Ted
I have been looking for these, mainly for scanning book titles on the
top shelves of libraries. Where can these trifocals be found?
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

I wear glasses.
I'd rather not do so when using the computer, so I ask: has anyone
designed software to adjust the optical characteristics of the screen,
via software, to make the wearing of glasses unnecessary?
This would be a great boon for those always in front of a screen.
There would be two fields for a mag & astimatism adjustment.
This whole thread reminds of the early days of TV in the home.

The screens were small, but you could buy a magnifying lens that fit in
front of your TV to make the screen look bigger.

Some of them were actually plastic shells of the right shape, filled
with water. They were much cheaper and much lighter than a solid glass
lens would be.

I never got to see one in action, but I suspect watching a TV with such
a lens wouldn't be much fun :)
 
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Z

Zaidy036

This whole thread reminds of the early days of TV in the home.

The screens were small, but you could buy a magnifying lens that fit in
front of your TV to make the screen look bigger.

Some of them were actually plastic shells of the right shape, filled
with water. They were much cheaper and much lighter than a solid glass
lens would be.

I never got to see one in action, but I suspect watching a TV with such
a lens wouldn't be much fun :)
It was not that bad - the screens were very small b&w only so was an
improvement
 

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