Externam Monitor


S

sothwalker

Looking for a 27 inch monitor and they are described as either

LCD
LED
LED Lit
LED LCD

Can someone shed some light on this.
 
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S

sothwalker

My typing is getting worse all the time...

External Monitor
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

Looking for a 27 inch monitor and they are described as either

LCD
LED
LED Lit
LED LCD

Can someone shed some light on this.
Good pun above :)

They are all LCD monitors.

The older ones were all backlit by fluorescent lighting; most of the
newer ones are backlit by LEDs.

LCD could mean either kind.

LED LCD and LED Lit are synonyms. To me, LED Lit is an unusual term.

LED is short for LED LCD.

LED displays are more robust and more energy efficient then fluorescent.

In some LED displays, the lights can be controlled in groups to give
some advantages in contrast.
 
S

sothwalker

Good pun above :)

They are all LCD monitors.

The older ones were all backlit by fluorescent lighting; most of the
newer ones are backlit by LEDs.

LCD could mean either kind.

LED LCD and LED Lit are synonyms. To me, LED Lit is an unusual term.

LED is short for LED LCD.

LED displays are more robust and more energy efficient then fluorescent.

In some LED displays, the lights can be controlled in groups to give
some advantages in contrast.
Thanks for your light! Think I will take the LED one.
 
C

Char Jackson

Good pun above :)

They are all LCD monitors.

The older ones were all backlit by fluorescent lighting; most of the
newer ones are backlit by LEDs.

LCD could mean either kind.
If it doesn't say LED it's *probably* lit by fluorescent lighting.
LED LCD and LED Lit are synonyms. To me, LED Lit is an unusual term.

LED is short for LED LCD.

LED displays are more robust and more energy efficient then fluorescent.
Some reviews also say that LED backlighting produces a more evenly lit
display, since fluorescent lighting is by design 'edge lighting'. I
have examples of both and I don't think I can tell a difference.
In some LED displays, the lights can be controlled in groups to give
some advantages in contrast.
Good summary, in spite of my extremely minor nits above.
 
R

richard

Good pun above :)

They are all LCD monitors.

The older ones were all backlit by fluorescent lighting; most of the
newer ones are backlit by LEDs.

LCD could mean either kind.

LED LCD and LED Lit are synonyms. To me, LED Lit is an unusual term.

LED is short for LED LCD.

LED displays are more robust and more energy efficient then fluorescent.

In some LED displays, the lights can be controlled in groups to give
some advantages in contrast.
LED=Light emitting diode.
LCD=Liquid crystal display.

You're behind in the times and technology.
The two used to mean the same thing.
Now they are different.
There are LED monitors which are not LCD.
An LED actually uses the Light emitting diodes as output.

A few years ago I had seen a video clip on the new technology.
The TV monitor was like 4ft across and was being built up in blocks.
Like stacking glass blocks. Even though it was incomplete, you were
watching it in action. Each block had it's own controller and when
conjoined with another block, the video expanded with it.

The huge monitors on the side of buildings are LED's.
 
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T

Tim Slattery

What???

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) monitors must use a backlight, since the
LCDs do not emit any light themselves. LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
*do* emit light, therefore they don't need a backlight. Therefore they
can be even thinner than LCD displays, and there is no backlight to
eventually fail and need replacement.
 
J

Jeff Layman

Good pun above :)

They are all LCD monitors.

The older ones were all backlit by fluorescent lighting; most of the
newer ones are backlit by LEDs.

LCD could mean either kind.

LED LCD and LED Lit are synonyms. To me, LED Lit is an unusual term.

LED is short for LED LCD.

LED displays are more robust and more energy efficient then fluorescent.

In some LED displays, the lights can be controlled in groups to give
some advantages in contrast.
Old technology. See:
http://www.oled-info.com/oled-tv
 
W

Wolf K

What???

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) monitors must use a backlight, since the
LCDs do not emit any light themselves. LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
*do* emit light, therefore they don't need a backlight. Therefore they
can be even thinner than LCD displays, and there is no backlight to
eventually fail and need replacement.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LED-backlit_LCD_television

It's instructive to follow the links on that page, too.
 
P

Paul

Tim said:
What???

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) monitors must use a backlight, since the
LCDs do not emit any light themselves. LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
*do* emit light, therefore they don't need a backlight. Therefore they
can be even thinner than LCD displays, and there is no backlight to
eventually fail and need replacement.
These are some examples of display devices.

CCFL_backlight ---> LCD ... (Viewer's eyeball)

LED_backlight ---> LCD ... (Viewer's eyeball)

OLED ... (Viewer's eyeball)
direct
emission

LED (billboard)... (Viewer's eyeball)
direct
emission

LEDs can be located behind an LCD panel, and the LED
functions as a light source, to replace the CCFL. The
advantage is, the LED needs no inverter and is
more reliable as a result.

Back in the old days, your TI calculator would have
a red LED display. That's an example of "direct emission",
where the light from the LED forms the displayed info.

Making large banks of LEDs, is difficult and expensive,
due to the sheer number of drivers, wires, power sources
and so on. They don't mind using stuff like that
in a football stadium, but for desktop usage, having
a million $0.20 LEDs shining into your eyeball, is a
non-starter.

Another kind of LED, which is only similar in name, is
the OLED. It's a direct emission device as well, and
as they make improvements in long term reliability, you're
going to see more of these. While some expensive, large
format display devices have been built with multiple of
these, they're not ready for prime time yet for that
kind of application. But some mobile devices could be
using one of these, as an alternative to LCD+backlight.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oled

The chemistry involved in that article is amazing.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c0/Ir(mppy)3.png

Paul
 
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G

Gene E. Bloch

LED=Light emitting diode.
LCD=Liquid crystal display.

You're behind in the times and technology.
The two used to mean the same thing.
Never.

Now they are different.
There are LED monitors which are not LCD.
An LED actually uses the Light emitting diodes as output.
Not so, since advertising copy often uses LED as an abbreviation for
LED-backlit LCD.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

At the 27" size, yes. (Are we ever going to get away from measuring
diagonally?)
If it doesn't say LED it's *probably* lit by fluorescent lighting.
Agreed.
Agreed.
Again, agreed. You _can_ get displays that are actually made of LEDs,
but only small ('phone type), which are probably organic LEDs (OLEDs),
or huge (stadium or advertising hoarding type).
True. (Though the efficiency isn't due to lack of inverter: LEDs still
need something other than ~12V or mains - it's just step-down rather
than step-up.)
Some reviews also say that LED backlighting produces a more evenly lit
display, since fluorescent lighting is by design 'edge lighting'. I
have examples of both and I don't think I can tell a difference.
I don't think so: I've seen displays dismantled, and the tubes are
squiggly behind the display, not just round the edge. They tend to be
_thicker_ though - LED ones are thin.
Yes, _some_ LED-backlit ones actually have a low-res. control of the
LEDs.
Good summary, in spite of my extremely minor nits above.
Agreed.
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

What???

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) monitors must use a backlight, since the
LCDs do not emit any light themselves. LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
*do* emit light, therefore they don't need a backlight. Therefore they
can be even thinner than LCD displays, and there is no backlight to
eventually fail and need replacement.[/QUOTE]

To put it succinctly, LED displays do not use LEDs to display the
pixels, rather they use LCD technology to display the pixels and LEDs
to backlight the display.

--
Zaphod

If I had two heads like you, Zaphod,
I could have hours of fun banging them against a wall.
-Ford Prefect
 
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Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

On Wed, 5 Dec 2012 08:09:18 -0500, "Zaphod Beeblebrox"
What???

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) monitors must use a backlight, since the
LCDs do not emit any light themselves. LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
*do* emit light, therefore they don't need a backlight. Therefore they
can be even thinner than LCD displays, and there is no backlight to
eventually fail and need replacement.
To put it succinctly, LED displays do not use LEDs to display the
pixels, rather they use LCD technology to display the pixels and LEDs
to backlight the display.[/QUOTE]

Lest anyone think I'm not aware of them, yes I know OLED displays
exist. However, unless your budget is in the thousands rather than
hundreds, we aren't talking about those displays here (unless while
I've been sleeping, someone has come out with consumer-grade OLED
displays of the desktop variety in with comparable pricing to LED
backlit LCD displays...)

--
Zaphod

"Yeah. Listen, I'm Zaphod Beeblebrox, my father was Zaphod Beeblebrox
the Second, my grandfather Zaphod Beeblebrox the Third..."

"What?"

"There was an accident with a contraceptive and a time machine. Now
concentrate!"
 
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J

Jeff Layman

OLED's still have the blue fade problem.
They are used in $400 cell phones and cameras because
people throw them away every year or two anyways.
I would hate to throw away my $10,000 oled monitor every two years.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=Sony+BVM-F170&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma&Top+Nav-Search=
Are you sure they haven't got around the blue fade issue? For example,
see "Lifespan" here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OLED. And that
refers to data from several years ago. Even if the 10000 - 14000 hour
life is still the norm (and I doubt that it is), that's still more than
5 years of viewing at an average of 5 hours a day, every day.

Still, I also wouldn't spend $10k on something that I could get in
another form for around a tenth of the price!
 

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