DHCP Enabled No


B

Bob H

I am trying to get DHCP going on my windows 7 machines, and although in
services it is shown as started, when I do ipconfig/all, it is not running.
I do get an IP address for each machine (when I run the said cmd on each).

It is enabled on my router, but I can't get it enabled on my 3 win7
computers.

Any ideas as to the problem may be?
Thanks
 
S

Seth

Bob H said:
I am trying to get DHCP going on my windows 7 machines, and although in
services it is shown as started, when I do ipconfig/all, it is not
running.
I do get an IP address for each machine (when I run the said cmd on each).

It is enabled on my router, but I can't get it enabled on my 3 win7
computers.
You talking about enabling a DHCP server on your Windows 7 computers? No
need to. There should only be 1 DHCP server on your network (unless you are
getting in Enterprise type failover scenarios, advanced config, etc...).

The service you see enabled on your computer is "DHCP Client". under
IPCONFIG /ALL you probably see numerous adapters and many of them are indeed
not DHCP enabled when idle. But for the specific sections on active network
adapters (Ethernet and\or wireless) it is probably showing as YES.
 
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B

Bob H

You talking about enabling a DHCP server on your Windows 7 computers? No
need to. There should only be 1 DHCP server on your network (unless you
are getting in Enterprise type failover scenarios, advanced config,
etc...).

The service you see enabled on your computer is "DHCP Client". under
IPCONFIG /ALL you probably see numerous adapters and many of them are
indeed not DHCP enabled when idle. But for the specific sections on
active network adapters (Ethernet and\or wireless) it is probably
showing as YES.
Thanks for the reply, and yes under Ethernet adapter Local Area
Connection DHCP is indeed enabled.

I was obviously looking at the wrong section.
 
S

stones

You talking about enabling a DHCP server on your Windows 7 computers? No
need to. There should only be 1 DHCP server on your network (unless you
are getting in Enterprise type failover scenarios, advanced config,
etc...).
There's only one DHCP *client* on mine. The router. The PCs behind it
have static addresses in the 192.168.*.* range, like the router itself.
That's not the default but setting it up that way is very convenient when
using software that opens listen ports on one of the machines. That way
the router can be configured to forward that port to a particular IP, and
it will always be forwarded to the correct PC. With the default settings,
the PCs got local addresses from the router's built-in DHCP server and
sometimes, depending on the order things rebooted in I guess, one got
192.168.0.100 and the other 192.168.0.101, and other times the other way
around. Rather than check the machines' IPs after every reboot, and then
go into the router config and change the target of all forwarded ports
every time they switched places, I decided I preferred the "set it and
forget it" solution of switching off the router's DHCP server and setting
the Windows boxes' TCP settings to manually assign their IP addresses.
They have the same two IPs now, but each one always has the same local
address now, and port forwarding to them Just Works.

Now I just need to remember to switch the TCP stack to manually assigned
address when adding a new box to this little cluster. :)
 
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C

charlie

There's only one DHCP *client* on mine. The router. The PCs behind it
have static addresses in the 192.168.*.* range, like the router itself.
That's not the default but setting it up that way is very convenient when
using software that opens listen ports on one of the machines. That way
the router can be configured to forward that port to a particular IP, and
it will always be forwarded to the correct PC. With the default settings,
the PCs got local addresses from the router's built-in DHCP server and
sometimes, depending on the order things rebooted in I guess, one got
192.168.0.100 and the other 192.168.0.101, and other times the other way
around. Rather than check the machines' IPs after every reboot, and then
go into the router config and change the target of all forwarded ports
every time they switched places, I decided I preferred the "set it and
forget it" solution of switching off the router's DHCP server and setting
the Windows boxes' TCP settings to manually assign their IP addresses.
They have the same two IPs now, but each one always has the same local
address now, and port forwarding to them Just Works.

Now I just need to remember to switch the TCP stack to manually assigned
address when adding a new box to this little cluster. :)
My routers allow both DHCP for a group of addresses, and fixed addresses
for those devices assigned addresses outside the DHCP address block.
(Usually such things as printers and network based storage.)
The P/Cs don't seem to have problems with using DHCP assigned addresses.
 

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