Copying video from the DVD player?


P

Peter Jason

Windows 7 has a DVD video player, and I ask:

Can I just copy video sections from the playing DVD disk and channel
the output back into the computer as a recording on the HDD?

I have:

1/ A normal DVD optical DVD drive on the Windows 7 computer.

2/ I have a video card Gigabyte GV-N480UD-15L/ with a mini-HDMI
connector and two DVI-1 connectors.

3/ I have a TV card, a Hauppauge HVR2200 MCE PCIe with RF in, FM in,
and SVHS input.

How do I connect the video card outputs so they can be channelled into
the TV card suitable for HDD recording? Are there conversions from
mini-HDMI or DVI-1 connectors of the video card to the SVHS input of
the TV card?

Peter.
 
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P

Paul

Peter said:
Windows 7 has a DVD video player, and I ask:

Can I just copy video sections from the playing DVD disk and channel
the output back into the computer as a recording on the HDD?

I have:

1/ A normal DVD optical DVD drive on the Windows 7 computer.

2/ I have a video card Gigabyte GV-N480UD-15L/ with a mini-HDMI
connector and two DVI-1 connectors.

3/ I have a TV card, a Hauppauge HVR2200 MCE PCIe with RF in, FM in,
and SVHS input.

How do I connect the video card outputs so they can be channelled into
the TV card suitable for HDD recording? Are there conversions from
mini-HDMI or DVI-1 connectors of the video card to the SVHS input of
the TV card?

Peter.
If everything is working properly, and you insert a commercial Hollywood
DVD, the video card HDMI output must be connected to an HDMI HDCP device.
This is what's known as a protected video path (PVP). The data coming from
the video card HDMI connector is encrypted, and is decrypted by an
LCD monitor which is also equipped with HDMI (and HDCP). That's how you
get a signal from A to B, while preventing Joe Consumer from pirating
the signal.

Now, you have options:

1) HDMI (with HDCP) video card connects to HDMI (with HDCP) device.
This works, but *no* consumer recording devices are allowed to be so-equipped.
This would facilitate pirating of movie content. Only pirates own such
equipment (the illegality doesn't particularly bother them). What it
does mean, is consumers cannot record the content they purchased in
the way that you describe.

If there was some output option, that produces a low resolution
copy, such as the SVHS connector on my Nvidia 7900GT video card,
that would be a low-resolution copy, barely equivalent to 640x480.
Sure, you could try to copy that. Some video card drivers specifically
disabled certain modes (Nvidia, mirrored output mode), to make that
more difficult to do. And since you can't set up a protected video path
across SVHS, if the movie player program wants to, it can deny output
on that connector.

2) OK, you're saying to yourself, I'll just buy an HDMI to SVHS output
conversion device. For one, that won't be protected by HDCP, and when the
movie player program asks for a Protected Video Path, the call will fail.
It all depends on whatever policy is associated with the event as to
what will happen. At one time, the plan was to "de-res" the picture,
make it fuzzy. But now, the option they use, may be to make the screen
black instead.

3) You can buy HDMI recording cards, but they're *only* intended for
capture from HDMI-equipped camcorders. The camcorders, which produce
their own original, non-Hollywood content, don't need to ask for a
protected video path. As a result, a non-HDCP equipped recording
card, can transfer footage from the camcorder or movie camera.

Examples of devices, are things like the BlackMagic products.

http://www.blackmagic-design.com/products/intensity/techspecs/

"For legal reasons HDMI input is unable to capture from copy protected
HDMI sources. Always confirm copyright ownership before capture or
distribution of content."

If they equipped their products with HDCP, they'd be slapped by the DMCA laws.

*Always* read the reviews on these products. In some cases, operations
that should work and are legal, fail to work. If the drivers fail to
work properly, they're going to "fail in Hollywood's favor". Even if it
means you don't get the result you paid for.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049

As an additional protection against pirating, the chips are hobbled
on purpose. Analog Devices makes at least three flavors of the same
chip. They each have a different bandwidth rating. The lowest flavor,
can only capture 1080i and not 1080p60. And the intention of
doing that, is so that if you come up with a way to "strip HDCP",
the capture device still isn't as useful as it could be. The higher
end versions, come equipped with HDCP keys internally. They're sold
to other large companies, presumably with a protocol in place to ensure
they're not "displaced, stolen, or redirected". Any useful chip, with
decryption capabilities, can only be used in things like an LCD
monitor, that doesn't re-release any outputs on its own.

There are undoubtedly HDCP strippers out there. Such a device,
would receive the encrypted signal on one side, and then retransmit
it in plaintext on the other side. You'd then connect your non-HDCP
capture device to the plaintext side. (This is possible, since the
HDCP keys were compromised a while back.)

http://copyrightandtechnology.com/2010/09/19/assessing-the-hdcp-hack/

In some ways, this is no different than the analog Macrovision era,
where Macrovision strippers or Time Base Correctors could be purchased,
to clean up the mess that Macrovision made. (In some cases, things that
should legally have worked, were ruined by Macrovision. Such as
capture devices with Macrovision protection on input, mistaking
sync levels as Macrovision, and ruining the picture.) Someone
will undoubtedly make an HDCP stripper. Take your time researching this,
as I expect it'll take hours and hours to find discussions of this. And
some over-active government, might even consider shutting down a website
that carries conversations on the subject. Anything is possible in our
modern world.

Since I don't regularly view Hollywood movies, don't have an HDCP
equipped display, I have no idea what policies exist for playing content.
And how restrictive a movie player will be, about what output devices
it'll drive when no PVP is available to protect the content. All I know
is, they have the technical means to be evil if they want. Or at the
very least, annoying.

If your DVD player would drive a decent resolution signal on the
YPbPr outputs (analog, component), and you could find a capture card
that would record such, then that might be as close as you can get to
a high resolution capture. In the BlackMagic advert, "component" is
the YPbPr thing.

http://www.eyepartner.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/05_blackmagic_intensity.png

Good luck,
Paul
 
P

Peter Jason

If everything is working properly, and you insert a commercial Hollywood
DVD, the video card HDMI output must be connected to an HDMI HDCP device.
This is what's known as a protected video path (PVP). The data coming from
the video card HDMI connector is encrypted, and is decrypted by an
LCD monitor which is also equipped with HDMI (and HDCP). That's how you
get a signal from A to B, while preventing Joe Consumer from pirating
the signal.

Now, you have options:

1) HDMI (with HDCP) video card connects to HDMI (with HDCP) device.
This works, but *no* consumer recording devices are allowed to be so-equipped.
This would facilitate pirating of movie content. Only pirates own such
equipment (the illegality doesn't particularly bother them). What it
does mean, is consumers cannot record the content they purchased in
the way that you describe.

If there was some output option, that produces a low resolution
copy, such as the SVHS connector on my Nvidia 7900GT video card,
that would be a low-resolution copy, barely equivalent to 640x480.
Sure, you could try to copy that. Some video card drivers specifically
disabled certain modes (Nvidia, mirrored output mode), to make that
more difficult to do. And since you can't set up a protected video path
across SVHS, if the movie player program wants to, it can deny output
on that connector.

2) OK, you're saying to yourself, I'll just buy an HDMI to SVHS output
conversion device. For one, that won't be protected by HDCP, and when the
movie player program asks for a Protected Video Path, the call will fail.
It all depends on whatever policy is associated with the event as to
what will happen. At one time, the plan was to "de-res" the picture,
make it fuzzy. But now, the option they use, may be to make the screen
black instead.

3) You can buy HDMI recording cards, but they're *only* intended for
capture from HDMI-equipped camcorders. The camcorders, which produce
their own original, non-Hollywood content, don't need to ask for a
protected video path. As a result, a non-HDCP equipped recording
card, can transfer footage from the camcorder or movie camera.

Examples of devices, are things like the BlackMagic products.

http://www.blackmagic-design.com/products/intensity/techspecs/

"For legal reasons HDMI input is unable to capture from copy protected
HDMI sources. Always confirm copyright ownership before capture or
distribution of content."

If they equipped their products with HDCP, they'd be slapped by the DMCA laws.

*Always* read the reviews on these products. In some cases, operations
that should work and are legal, fail to work. If the drivers fail to
work properly, they're going to "fail in Hollywood's favor". Even if it
means you don't get the result you paid for.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815100049

As an additional protection against pirating, the chips are hobbled
on purpose. Analog Devices makes at least three flavors of the same
chip. They each have a different bandwidth rating. The lowest flavor,
can only capture 1080i and not 1080p60. And the intention of
doing that, is so that if you come up with a way to "strip HDCP",
the capture device still isn't as useful as it could be. The higher
end versions, come equipped with HDCP keys internally. They're sold
to other large companies, presumably with a protocol in place to ensure
they're not "displaced, stolen, or redirected". Any useful chip, with
decryption capabilities, can only be used in things like an LCD
monitor, that doesn't re-release any outputs on its own.

There are undoubtedly HDCP strippers out there. Such a device,
would receive the encrypted signal on one side, and then retransmit
it in plaintext on the other side. You'd then connect your non-HDCP
capture device to the plaintext side. (This is possible, since the
HDCP keys were compromised a while back.)

http://copyrightandtechnology.com/2010/09/19/assessing-the-hdcp-hack/

In some ways, this is no different than the analog Macrovision era,
where Macrovision strippers or Time Base Correctors could be purchased,
to clean up the mess that Macrovision made. (In some cases, things that
should legally have worked, were ruined by Macrovision. Such as
capture devices with Macrovision protection on input, mistaking
sync levels as Macrovision, and ruining the picture.) Someone
will undoubtedly make an HDCP stripper. Take your time researching this,
as I expect it'll take hours and hours to find discussions of this. And
some over-active government, might even consider shutting down a website
that carries conversations on the subject. Anything is possible in our
modern world.

Since I don't regularly view Hollywood movies, don't have an HDCP
equipped display, I have no idea what policies exist for playing content.
And how restrictive a movie player will be, about what output devices
it'll drive when no PVP is available to protect the content. All I know
is, they have the technical means to be evil if they want. Or at the
very least, annoying.

If your DVD player would drive a decent resolution signal on the
YPbPr outputs (analog, component), and you could find a capture card
that would record such, then that might be as close as you can get to
a high resolution capture. In the BlackMagic advert, "component" is
the YPbPr thing.

http://www.eyepartner.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/05_blackmagic_intensity.png

Good luck,
Paul


Thanks, All I have at the moment is this:
http://www.noobie.com.au/products/images/hauppauge_av_cable_2200mce.jpeg
for the TV card, allowing composite inputs.

I'll do some trials on this, and other options.

Peter
 
C

Char Jackson

Windows 7 has a DVD video player, and I ask:

Can I just copy video sections from the playing DVD disk and channel
the output back into the computer as a recording on the HDD?

I have:

1/ A normal DVD optical DVD drive on the Windows 7 computer.

2/ I have a video card Gigabyte GV-N480UD-15L/ with a mini-HDMI
connector and two DVI-1 connectors.

3/ I have a TV card, a Hauppauge HVR2200 MCE PCIe with RF in, FM in,
and SVHS input.

How do I connect the video card outputs so they can be channelled into
the TV card suitable for HDD recording? Are there conversions from
mini-HDMI or DVI-1 connectors of the video card to the SVHS input of
the TV card?

Peter.
I would forget about trying to capture the video as it's playing, and
I would seriously forget about trying to capture video from your HDMI
output.

The much, much, easier way is to just rip the portion of video that
you want directly from the DVD, without playing it, and without
involving any of your capture cards. You can use a lot of programs for
that, but I use the tried and true (and old and no longer supported by
their authors, but they continue to work flawlessly for me) DVD Shrink
and DVD Decrypter. DVD Fab and ImgBurn are also excellent tools to
have on hand. AnyDVD is also excellent, but not free.

http://www.dvddecrypter.org.uk/
http://www.dvdshrink.org/what_en.php
http://www.dvdfab.com/free.htm
http://www.imgburn.com/
http://www.slysoft.com/en/anydvdhd.html
http://www.videohelp.com (tutorials)

What you're trying to do is ridiculously easy, unless you insist on
involving HDMI (and it's ugly cousin HDCP).
 
P

Peter Jason

I would forget about trying to capture the video as it's playing, and
I would seriously forget about trying to capture video from your HDMI
output.

The much, much, easier way is to just rip the portion of video that
you want directly from the DVD, without playing it, and without
involving any of your capture cards. You can use a lot of programs for
that, but I use the tried and true (and old and no longer supported by
their authors, but they continue to work flawlessly for me) DVD Shrink
and DVD Decrypter. DVD Fab and ImgBurn are also excellent tools to
have on hand. AnyDVD is also excellent, but not free.

http://www.dvddecrypter.org.uk/
http://www.dvdshrink.org/what_en.php
http://www.dvdfab.com/free.htm
http://www.imgburn.com/
http://www.slysoft.com/en/anydvdhd.html
http://www.videohelp.com (tutorials)

What you're trying to do is ridiculously easy, unless you insist on
involving HDMI (and it's ugly cousin HDCP).

Not always, and not all DVDs are equal in the copying game.
For one recent difficult one:

"RipIt4Me" won't even start on Windows 7

DVD Decrypter doesn't work. Gives error message.

DVD shrink doesn't work. Gives error message.

ditto "Magic DVD ripper".

ditto "Xilisoft DVD ripper".

ditto "Plato DVD ripper"

imgBurn tells me the DVD is "Copy Protected".

DVDFab 8.0.7.3 could be used to "copy the disk main movie" to give
the VIDEO_TS set but Nero8 got half way thru the burn and encountered
än error" and "could not continue".

However "ConvertXtoDVD 4" accepted the VIDEO_TS set and burned it
successfully, though I have yet to sit down and watch the movie all
the way through.

This sort of thing is hard on the nerves, and a lot of work as well.
There has to be some better way.

Peter.
 
C

Char Jackson

Not always, and not all DVDs are equal in the copying game.
For one recent difficult one:

"RipIt4Me" won't even start on Windows 7

DVD Decrypter doesn't work. Gives error message.

DVD shrink doesn't work. Gives error message.

ditto "Magic DVD ripper".

ditto "Xilisoft DVD ripper".

ditto "Plato DVD ripper"

imgBurn tells me the DVD is "Copy Protected".

DVDFab 8.0.7.3 could be used to "copy the disk main movie" to give
the VIDEO_TS set but Nero8 got half way thru the burn and encountered
än error" and "could not continue".

However "ConvertXtoDVD 4" accepted the VIDEO_TS set and burned it
successfully, though I have yet to sit down and watch the movie all
the way through.

This sort of thing is hard on the nerves, and a lot of work as well.
There has to be some better way.
You're having way more trouble than I've ever had, so you have my
condolences. BTW, I'm guessing AnyDVD and ImgBurn (together) would do
the trick.
 
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S

Seth

Char Jackson said:
You're having way more trouble than I've ever had, so you have my
condolences. BTW, I'm guessing AnyDVD and ImgBurn (together) would do
the trick.
AnyDVD works great but is not free. MaximumPC did a write up on something
like AnyDVD (it was DVDFRee or something like that) that was freeware.

To the OP, AnyDVD (and DVDFree or whatever it is) sit in the systray (like a
TSR) and decrypt the copy protection in the background making all your DVDs
look unprotected (avoiding the disk is protected errors you listed earlier).

Once either of those TSRs are running properly, any DVD ripping software
should work.
 
A

Anthony Buckland

Peter Jason said:
Windows 7 has a DVD video player, and I ask:

Can I just copy video sections from the playing DVD disk and channel
the output back into the computer as a recording on the HDD?
...
If you're willing to put up with the quality of a pirated
copy made by an audience member sitting in a
theater, play the DVD and record the output with a
camcorder.

This follows the general principle that, if you can see
it on a screen, still or moving, then you can save it,
with quality compromises.
 
A

Alex Clayton

You're having way more trouble than I've ever had, so you have my
condolences. BTW, I'm guessing AnyDVD and ImgBurn (together) would do
the trick.

I bought the one Real put out and it always worked great. When they lost
the battle in court Real refunded my money and I tried a bunch of them,
both free and pay. All worked most times. The free one seemed to work as
well as the pay, but all of them would now and then run into one they
could not copy. I got my money back on the pay ones and then found DVD
Fab. I have been using it for over a year and never had a problem, it
makes a copy of every DVD I have tried so far. It has been well worth
the cost to lease it just in how much frustration it saves, and it works
for dummies, like me.
 
R

relic

Seth said:
AnyDVD works great but is not free. MaximumPC did a write up on something
like AnyDVD (it was DVDFRee or something like that) that was freeware.

To the OP, AnyDVD (and DVDFree or whatever it is) sit in the systray (like
a TSR) and decrypt the copy protection in the background making all your
DVDs look unprotected (avoiding the disk is protected errors you listed
earlier).

Once either of those TSRs are running properly, any DVD ripping software
should work.
If you're thinking of "DVD43", it hasn't been updated since ~2009.

I haven't found anything except AnyDVD that works with some of the new
encryption schemes.
 
S

Seth

relic said:
If you're thinking of "DVD43", it hasn't been updated since ~2009.

I haven't found anything except AnyDVD that works with some of the new
encryption schemes.
Yeah, that's the one I was thinking of. Stopped using it when I switched to
AnyDVD so couldn't quite remember.
 
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P

Peter Jason

You're having way more trouble than I've ever had, so you have my
condolences. BTW, I'm guessing AnyDVD and ImgBurn (together) would do
the trick.
I did watch that movie all the way through and the video quality was
very good.

But the movie faltered for 30sec every so often before continuing.
Perhaps at the every beginning of a file in the Video_TS folder.

I still have to try AnyDVD.
 
B

Brian Gregory [UK]

Peter Jason said:
I did watch that movie all the way through and the video quality was
very good.

But the movie faltered for 30sec every so often before continuing.
Perhaps at the every beginning of a file in the Video_TS folder.

I still have to try AnyDVD.

VLC, which in recent versions has become a very nice stable and more or less
universal play any file video and audio player has a re encoding function
(not really tried it much myself though).

AnyDVD is good, removes all region coding, and copy protection.
There is also a Blu-ray/HD-DVD version though I don't know if it is as
complete as the DVD version.
 
R

relic

Brian Gregory said:
AnyDVD is good, removes all region coding, and copy protection.
There is also a Blu-ray/HD-DVD version though I don't know if it is as
complete as the DVD version.
AnyDVDHD includes all of the decryption techniques for normal DVDs.

Beware of some SONY DVD Players; they won't play a DVD with the Region
Coding removed.
 
W

Walter Goldschmidt

DVDFab to copy movie disk and Imgburn to burn it to disk. DVDFab has a free
part to the program you don't have to pay for I believe it's called DVD
Decrypter that rips the movie to a folder on your computer. AUDIO_TS &
VIDEO_TS. Inside the VIDEO_TS is what you burn to a DVD disk.

"Anthony Buckland" wrote in message


Peter Jason said:
Windows 7 has a DVD video player, and I ask:

Can I just copy video sections from the playing DVD disk and channel
the output back into the computer as a recording on the HDD?
...
If you're willing to put up with the quality of a pirated
copy made by an audience member sitting in a
theater, play the DVD and record the output with a
camcorder.

This follows the general principle that, if you can see
it on a screen, still or moving, then you can save it,
with quality compromises.
 
A

Alex Clayton

DVDFab to copy movie disk and Imgburn to burn it to disk. DVDFab has a
free part to the program you don't have to pay for I believe it's called
DVD Decrypter that rips the movie to a folder on your computer. AUDIO_TS
& VIDEO_TS. Inside the VIDEO_TS is what you burn to a DVD disk.

in message




If you're willing to put up with the quality of a pirated
copy made by an audience member sitting in a
theater, play the DVD and record the output with a
camcorder.

This follows the general principle that, if you can see
it on a screen, still or moving, then you can save it,
with quality compromises.
I think you may be mixing a couple of these up. I have DVD Fab, been
using it for a little over a year. It offers a number of choices, all
free to try, then if you want to use it they sell a 2 year lease. I
bought and use the option to rip a DVD to a drive so you can watch it on
any computer. I had tried a couple free and pay ones and IIRC DVD
Decrypter was one of the free ones that did the same thing, would rip a
DVD to a drive. It worked most of the time but now and then would not,
as I found with all of them I tried. So far DVD Fab has never failed. It
has been though many up grades since I paid, the few times I got a new
movie it would not work with all I had to do was load the update and
away it would go. It has also gotten much faster after the upgrades.
 
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W

Walter Goldschmidt

I believe all options of DVDFab work for 30 days but there is one that is
free and continues to work after 30 days. Double check your facts and so
will I.

Walt

"Alex Clayton" wrote in message

DVDFab to copy movie disk and Imgburn to burn it to disk. DVDFab has a
free part to the program you don't have to pay for I believe it's called
DVD Decrypter that rips the movie to a folder on your computer. AUDIO_TS
& VIDEO_TS. Inside the VIDEO_TS is what you burn to a DVD disk.

in message




If you're willing to put up with the quality of a pirated
copy made by an audience member sitting in a
theater, play the DVD and record the output with a
camcorder.

This follows the general principle that, if you can see
it on a screen, still or moving, then you can save it,
with quality compromises.
I think you may be mixing a couple of these up. I have DVD Fab, been
using it for a little over a year. It offers a number of choices, all
free to try, then if you want to use it they sell a 2 year lease. I
bought and use the option to rip a DVD to a drive so you can watch it on
any computer. I had tried a couple free and pay ones and IIRC DVD
Decrypter was one of the free ones that did the same thing, would rip a
DVD to a drive. It worked most of the time but now and then would not,
as I found with all of them I tried. So far DVD Fab has never failed. It
has been though many up grades since I paid, the few times I got a new
movie it would not work with all I had to do was load the update and
away it would go. It has also gotten much faster after the upgrades.
 
W

Walter Goldschmidt

I went to Web site and below is what is stated about DVDFab HD Decrypter.

DVDFab HD Decrypter

DVDFab HD Decrypter is a simple version of DVDFab DVD Copy and DVDFab
Blu-ray Copy which can remove all the DVD protections, part of Blu-ray
protections, and copy the DVD/Blu-ray to your hard drive. It is one of the
always free portions of DVDFab application. With its various settings and
options to edit, you will definitely get a fantastic output. In addition,
the copying speed is very fast and the quality is wonderful.

Walt

"Alex Clayton" wrote in message

DVDFab to copy movie disk and Imgburn to burn it to disk. DVDFab has a
free part to the program you don't have to pay for I believe it's called
DVD Decrypter that rips the movie to a folder on your computer. AUDIO_TS
& VIDEO_TS. Inside the VIDEO_TS is what you burn to a DVD disk.

in message




If you're willing to put up with the quality of a pirated
copy made by an audience member sitting in a
theater, play the DVD and record the output with a
camcorder.

This follows the general principle that, if you can see
it on a screen, still or moving, then you can save it,
with quality compromises.
I think you may be mixing a couple of these up. I have DVD Fab, been
using it for a little over a year. It offers a number of choices, all
free to try, then if you want to use it they sell a 2 year lease. I
bought and use the option to rip a DVD to a drive so you can watch it on
any computer. I had tried a couple free and pay ones and IIRC DVD
Decrypter was one of the free ones that did the same thing, would rip a
DVD to a drive. It worked most of the time but now and then would not,
as I found with all of them I tried. So far DVD Fab has never failed. It
has been though many up grades since I paid, the few times I got a new
movie it would not work with all I had to do was load the update and
away it would go. It has also gotten much faster after the upgrades.
 
A

Alex Clayton

I went to Web site and below is what is stated about DVDFab HD Decrypter.

DVDFab HD Decrypter

DVDFab HD Decrypter is a simple version of DVDFab DVD Copy and DVDFab
Blu-ray Copy which can remove all the DVD protections, part of Blu-ray
protections, and copy the DVD/Blu-ray to your hard drive. It is one of
the always free portions of DVDFab application. With its various
settings and options to edit, you will definitely get a fantastic
output. In addition, the copying speed is very fast and the quality is
wonderful.

Walt

in message



I think you may be mixing a couple of these up. I have DVD Fab, been
using it for a little over a year. It offers a number of choices, all
free to try, then if you want to use it they sell a 2 year lease. I
bought and use the option to rip a DVD to a drive so you can watch it on
any computer. I had tried a couple free and pay ones and IIRC DVD
Decrypter was one of the free ones that did the same thing, would rip a
DVD to a drive. It worked most of the time but now and then would not,
as I found with all of them I tried. So far DVD Fab has never failed. It
has been though many up grades since I paid, the few times I got a new
movie it would not work with all I had to do was load the update and
away it would go. It has also gotten much faster after the upgrades.

Damn, that sounds good. I have about 8 months left on my sub to them.
When it is up I will give the free version a shot before I pay for
another 2 years, thanks. It has been quite a while since I spent many
frustrating weeks playing with the different brands so memory is always
questionable after that long. ïŠ
I remember trying a couple pay ones that at first seemed fine, but
sooner or later would run into a disc they could not de-code. After it
would happen a few times I would try another and get my money back on
the first. Then the new one would start running into trouble. All the
searching turned up the one free one that seemed to work about as well
as any of the pay. It was not until I found DVD fab that I finally found
one that always works. It will be great if it is free next time. I knew
it offered a bunch of different options but the only thing I have ever
cared about was being able to make a copy on a drive so I could watch it
when I was ready.
 
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S

Stan Brown

DVD Decrypter doesn't work. Gives error message.

DVD shrink doesn't work. Gives error message.
Why, why, why do people say "error message" without saying what the
message was?
 

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