adding a wireless printer


J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Char Jackson said:
Before asking if the router has WiFi capabilities, we should ask if the OP
has a router at all. Most DSL modems don't include router functionality.
In the UK, the converse is the case - most do. (Well, ADSL, which is the
norm here.) To the extent that the terms get used almost
interchangeably, which can catch some people out when they don't get a
MoDem!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Knowledge isnt elitist - that's rubbish! Why are we embarrassed by the idea
that people know things? It's not a conspiracy against the ignorant. Knowing
things is good!" - Jeremy Paxman, RT 14-20 August 2010
 
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W

Wolf K

Easy peasy. Configure the second one as an access point. I've done dozens of
deployments that way. Holler if you need details.
OK, thanks Char, I'm hollering. ;-).
Umm, spare the goat. ;-)
Ta, I won't have to buy one. ;-)
 
C

Char Jackson

In Char Jackson


I've been through several, and never had one that didn't.
I've never seen one that did, except in pictures. I know the combo units are
more popular in some areas, though, especially overseas, or should I say
outside of the US to accommodate our non-US friends.
 
C

Char Jackson

OK, thanks Char, I'm hollering. ;-).
It takes much longer to type out the instructions than to do the steps, so
I'm going to start by referring you to a couple of websites that contain
step by step procedures, with pictures and examples.

Start here to convert your second wireless router into an access point.
<http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wire...onvert-a-wireless-router-into-an-access-point>

The very end of that article will link you to the next article, telling you
how to connect your 'new' access point to your existing wireless network.
<http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wire...w-to-add-an-access-point-to-a-wireless-router>

Note that, on page 2 of this article, in Step 3, they suggest setting the
SSID on the access point to something different than the SSID on your main
wireless router. This is so that you can more easily decide which wireless
device you should connect to. Using the same SSID usually means you'll
connect to whichever device responds first, and that may not always be the
best choice.

Let us know how you get on.
 
B

Bert

In Char Jackson
Note that, on page 2 of this article, in Step 3, they suggest setting
the SSID on the access point to something different than the SSID on
your main wireless router. This is so that you can more easily decide
which wireless device you should connect to. Using the same SSID
usually means you'll connect to whichever device responds first, and
that may not always be the best choice.
I have both of mine set to the same SSID. My iPad very smoothly
switch to the one with the strongest signal as I wander through the
house.
 
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B

Bert

In Char Jackson
I've never seen one that did, except in pictures. I know the combo
units are more popular in some areas, though, especially overseas, or
should I say outside of the US to accommodate our non-US friends.
Are you sure you're not thinking of cable modems?

The cable companies used to charge extra for the "privilege" of having a
home network.

Or maybe you meant that they don't come with WiFi routers?

I started with an ActionTec 1524, moved to a Cisco 675, then to a Cisco
678 and finally to an ActionTec GT701.

All of them include a router function, but only the GT701 has WiFi.
 
C

Char Jackson

In Char Jackson


Are you sure you're not thinking of cable modems?
No. :) Big difference between DSL modems and cable modems.
The cable companies used to charge extra for the "privilege" of having a
home network.
Only if you use their equipment, I believe. I don't think there was ever a
charge to do it yourself.
 
W

Wolf K

In Char Jackson


Are you sure you're not thinking of cable modems?

The cable companies used to charge extra for the "privilege" of having a
home network.

Or maybe you meant that they don't come with WiFi routers?

I started with an ActionTec 1524, moved to a Cisco 675, then to a Cisco
678 and finally to an ActionTec GT701.

All of them include a router function, but only the GT701 has WiFi.
The Wi-fi modem that Bell sent me has 4 Ethernet ports, too. It's
designed to be both a home network hub and a modem.
 
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B

Bert

The Wi-fi modem that Bell sent me has 4 Ethernet ports, too. It's
designed to be both a home network hub and a modem.
Qwest, now Century Link, cheaped it and sent the Actiontec GT701, which
has only one port, instead of the GT704 which has 4. But, I've got
switches all over the house already, so one more wasn't a big deal :)
 

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