How to I do a full restore


M

Metspitzer

I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I
only had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days
ago. It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not
fully sure I have fixed anything.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
 
D

Dave-UK

Metspitzer said:
I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I
only had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days
ago. It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not
fully sure I have fixed anything.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
The system restore sounds like it killed whatever you installed.
Run Malwarebytes or something to clean up your computer.

If you want to have a full image restore then you have to back up
your drive to an external drive first.
Go to Help and Support and enter 'image restore' for information.
 
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K

Ken Blake

I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.


What harmful web site? A free scan by *what* program? What were the
infected files? What were they infected with?

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I
only had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days
ago. It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not
fully sure I have fixed anything.

A system restore hardly ever will remove an infection.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.

Exactly what do you mean by "a full restore"? Do you mean a clean
reinstallation of Windows? If so, that's almost always overkill for
infections, but if there were 24 *different* infections (rather than
one infection infecting 24 files), it might be necessary.

But first answer the questions above. The program that did the free
scan and found the infections may well be an infection itself.
 
S

Stefan Patric

I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected. I
got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I only
had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days ago.
It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not fully
sure I have fixed anything.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
No need for that. Go to these two websites and download the free
versions of their software.

http://www.malwarebytes.org/
http://www.superantispyware.com/

Before doing anything do a full back up of your system, or at the very
least, your data. Thoroughly read the software instructions or "help"
files before doing the scans. Choose the FULL scan for both of your C:
drive. Do Malwarebytes first, the Superantispyware. Your system should
be clean of bad-ware. Then install realtime anti-virus and anti-spyware
utilities, one of each. No more is needed. I use Avast! and Spybot.
Both free.

Stef
 
W

Wolf K

No need for that. Go to these two websites and download the free
versions of their software.

http://www.malwarebytes.org/
http://www.superantispyware.com/

Before doing anything do a full back up of your system, or at the very
least, your data. Thoroughly read the software instructions or "help"
files before doing the scans. Choose the FULL scan for both of your C:
drive. Do Malwarebytes first, the Superantispyware. Your system should
be clean of bad-ware. Then install realtime anti-virus and anti-spyware
utilities, one of each. No more is needed. I use Avast! and Spybot.
Both free.

Stef
+1

And never believe a "Windows" report that your machine is infected.
Windows doesn't do that. AFAIK, no OS does.
 
M

Metspitzer

What harmful web site? A free scan by *what* program? What were the
infected files? What were they infected with?




A system restore hardly ever will remove an infection.




Exactly what do you mean by "a full restore"? Do you mean a clean
reinstallation of Windows? If so, that's almost always overkill for
infections, but if there were 24 *different* infections (rather than
one infection infecting 24 files), it might be necessary.

But first answer the questions above. The program that did the free
scan and found the infections may well be an infection itself.
Sorry, I don't have the names of any of the infected files. I should
have taken screenshots.

After doing a system restore, I am getting no reports of infection.
What I wanted to do was back up the image I was storing on a separate
disk, but I didn't find an option to do that. If I find out that
there is still a problem, I plan to search for "image restore" and try
that.

Thanks
 
M

Metspitzer

No need for that. Go to these two websites and download the free
versions of their software.

http://www.malwarebytes.org/
http://www.superantispyware.com/

Before doing anything do a full back up of your system, or at the very
least, your data. Thoroughly read the software instructions or "help"
files before doing the scans. Choose the FULL scan for both of your C:
drive. Do Malwarebytes first, the Superantispyware. Your system should
be clean of bad-ware. Then install realtime anti-virus and anti-spyware
utilities, one of each. No more is needed. I use Avast! and Spybot.
Both free.

Stef
Thanks for the tips
 
D

Dave

On Sat, 09 Mar 2013 10:51:39 -0500, Metspitzer wrote:

To be really safe against hazards, both viral and hardware failure, you
need to do a full image backup of at least your C drive to an external
device. You can use windows backup (it's quite good), but macrium is
better. The free version does an image backup, the paid for version does
image, file backup, incremental and other stuff.
With windows there is no compression (AFAIK) and you can't recover
individual files. Macrium creates one compressed backup file and you can
view and recover individual files or folders.
Run Malwarebytes and if you don't have virus protection, install one of
the free versions. I use MS Essentials, but AVG, AVAST or AVIRA are all
good and have free versions.

Both programs will backup multiple partitions you might need for restore,
like recovery partition and dell utilities on a dell machine.
 
A

antiscam

I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I
only had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days
ago. It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not
fully sure I have fixed anything.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
You were probably being scammed and really had no virus at all. There
are websites that do just that so they can suck money out of you. If
you have a virus scanner installed then you were probably well
protected.

Consider just using MS security esentials. It is free and works just
fine. I have been using it on all six of my PCs and never have had a
virus. I see those scam websites from time to time as I do a lot of
web surfing. I am running Win XP Pro and Win 7 Pro. That should be
all you need.
The other suggested scanners/cleaners that you can download are fine
but I doubt that they will find the mystery virus.
 
1

123Jim

I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.

I tried to go to backup restore to restore the most current back up.
There was only an option to choose files and folders. I was expecting
to have an option to install a full backup. I was afraid if I started
just picking folders, that I would mess up more than I would fix.

What I did instead was install a restore point from 3 days ago. I
only had 2 restore points. One point was for today and one for 3 days
ago. It is not reporting any infections at the moment, but I am not
fully sure I have fixed anything.

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
Which Make and Model is your computer? Many computers have a recovery
partition which allows you to restore the computer back to factory
settings (destroying all user data mind you!) My computer is an HP G7
laptop and has a recovery manager which I have never had to use .... yet

It has an option to create recovery disk on DVDs also.. I've never
gotten around to creating then .. two years later .. I would need 5 DVD-R+

Looks like you did the right thing using System restore I have found it
useful quite often. The trick is to use it before it is too late when
all the good restore points have been replaced over time.

If I were you I would now run Superantispyware or Malwarebytes as
recommended by others, but in safe mode.
 
M

Metspitzer

Which Make and Model is your computer? Many computers have a recovery
partition which allows you to restore the computer back to factory
settings (destroying all user data mind you!) My computer is an HP G7
laptop and has a recovery manager which I have never had to use .... yet

It has an option to create recovery disk on DVDs also.. I've never
gotten around to creating then .. two years later .. I would need 5 DVD-R+

Looks like you did the right thing using System restore I have found it
useful quite often. The trick is to use it before it is too late when
all the good restore points have been replaced over time.

If I were you I would now run Superantispyware or Malwarebytes as
recommended by others, but in safe mode.
I built my computer so I have no way to do a factory restore. I have
used that before on a laptop. It is a great feature.
 
M

mick

Which Make and Model is your computer? Many computers have a recovery
partition which allows you to restore the computer back to factory
settings (destroying all user data mind you!) My computer is an HP G7
laptop and has a recovery manager which I have never had to use .... yet

It has an option to create recovery disk on DVDs also.. I've never
gotten around to creating then .. two years later .. I would need 5 DVD-R+

Looks like you did the right thing using System restore I have found it
useful quite often. The trick is to use it before it is too late when
all the good restore points have been replaced over time.

If I were you I would now run Superantispyware or Malwarebytes as
recommended by others, but in safe mode.
I built my computer so I have no way to do a factory restore. I have
used that before on a laptop. It is a great feature.[/QUOTE]

someone who had the knowledge to BUILD their own computer, got caught
by a common web scam and needs to ask how to do full restore?
 
R

Robert Baer

Metspitzer said:
I went to a harmful web site and Windows reported that I was infected.
I got the option to do a free scan. The free scan found 24 infected
files. It wanted 8 bucks to clean them.
* I would advise EVERYBODY to _never_ do a "free scan" because (1) it is
an excellent way to get root kits, virii, and other malware, and/or (2)
an excellent way to create more damage.
 
N

Nil

I wish I could do a full restore. I am not really sure how.
It's not clear to me from your wording whether or not you've ever made
an actual fill backup. If you haven't, you can never do a "full
restore". Otherwise, your next step is to reinstall the OS from the
installation disks.
 
R

Robert Baer

Wolf said:
+1

And never believe a "Windows" report that your machine is infected.
Windows doesn't do that. AFAIK, no OS does.
Not even Win7 which is pretty resistant and reasonably self-healing.
 
P

Paul

Metspitzer said:
Sorry, I don't have the names of any of the infected files. I should
have taken screenshots.

After doing a system restore, I am getting no reports of infection.
What I wanted to do was back up the image I was storing on a separate
disk, but I didn't find an option to do that. If I find out that
there is still a problem, I plan to search for "image restore" and try
that.

Thanks
You can make a System Image. And store that on a separate drive.
That's what I do for my laptop.

If you can't find the control panel to do that, try things like this.
The first one should bring up a control panel. The second one
is for selecting where to store the image. Something like that.

sdclt /configure
sdclt /configure /target

System Restore points, do record some things, but System Restore
is not the same thing as a System Image. A System Image captures
the entire C: and SYSTEM RESERVED partitions for you, if you set it
up that way.

And Macrium Reflect Free does much the same thing. Both methods
use VSS to record the partitions.

In both cases, you need to boot the computer with separate media,
during the restoration step. So if I was restoring from Macrium Reflect
Free, I'd boot the Macrium recovery CD. If restoring from System Image,
I boot the Windows installer DVD (or, boot the recovery CD which you
can make in the same control panel as the "Making a System Image" thing).

I've used the System Image on my Windows 7 laptop, to successfully rescue
me a couple times. Once, the system wouldn't boot, and the automatic
repair tried three times to fix it and it couldn't. I booted the
CD I'd made (which gets you to a point where you can access the
System Image for recovery), and that overwrites the contents of
C: and SYSTEM RESERVED partitions.

Just make sure, when you set up the backup operation, to back up
whatever is needed to boot the computer. If you have a single
partition install (C: only), then that's all you need. If you
have a two partition install, like my Acer laptop came with
(C: and SYSTEM RESERVED), then you include both of those in
your System Image. My C: is 26GB, and my SYSTEM RESERVED is 0.1GB.
The SYSTEM RESERVED just contains a few boot files.

If you look in the backup folder, you should find two .vhd files,
which are images of the partitions. In an emergency, those images
can even be mounted on another computer, as if they were disk
drives. So they're complete partition copies. In fact, I use
those backup files from the laptop, in Virtual PC, as data disks,
when I want to look at the contents of my laptop for reference
purposes.

*******

In addition to MalwareBytes, you can download this CD and use it
to scan your Windows 7 computer. This is termed an "offline" scan,
as the boot CD is actually a Linux CD with a Windows AV scanner
loaded in it. I consider it to be pretty thorough, as it looks
inside any archive files it can find. (It can't open
password-protected archives.) The last time I looked, the
download was around 237MB. In the interface, you tick the tick
boxes of the partitions you want tested. For the C: on my
current computer (about 40GB of files), a run takes around
2 hours. The CD has a web browser, so you can web browse
while the AV scan on C: is running.

http://support.kaspersky.com/8092

HTH,
Paul
 
P

Paul

Robert said:
* Isn't there something like these that will do a ONE TIME scan when run?
I do not want umpteen programs running in the background - especially
when they are supposedly doing the "same thing".
The free version of Malwarebytes, is a one time scan.
The *paid* version of Malwarebytes, is a resident tool.

The Kaspersky rescue disk, is a one time scan.

Paul
 
P

Paul

mick said:
someone who had the knowledge to BUILD their own computer, got caught by
a common web scam and needs to ask how to do full restore?
And that's why we're here, to help them out :)

Paul
 
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